02-12-18

Call for Proposals! 2018 Midwest Urban Design Charrette

children_garden

This fall, the CUDC and our three academic partners – Lawrence Technological University’s College of Architecture and Design in Detroit, MI; the State University of New York at Buffalo in Buffalo, NY; and Ball State University’s Urban Design Center in Indianapolis, IN – will bring graduate students in urban design, architecture, and landscape architecture to a selected community for a 3-4 day intensive design workshop (or charrette). The Midwest Urban Design Charrette has been conducted for seven consecutive years, most recently traveling to Detroit, MI in 2017 and Akron, OH in 2016.

CuxedV7XEAAoGYE

IMG_3410

The CUDC is looking for a community partner from a city, suburb, town, or neighborhood in western New York; northwestern Pennsylvania; northern Ohio; northern Indiana; or the lower peninsula of Michigan, facing a unique urban design or planning challenge and in need of fresh ideas and perspectives.

This year, the Midwest Urban Design Charrette is specifically seeking communities with issues related to one or more of the following areas of interest:
• resilience to the impacts of climate change;
• environmental justice;
• patterns of migration into or out of a community, either domestically or internationally; and
• immigrant communities.

If you’d like for your community to be considered for this year’s charrette, please send a brief proposal no later than April 2, 2018 to cudc@kent.edu. Please see our full RFP in .pdf format here for submission details.

Thank you for your interest, & we hope to hear from you soon!

IMG_9242

01-18-18

Cleveland Housing Issues & Opportunities: A Panel Discussion | Jan 23

before-after

exterior_pano

The Cleveland Public Library will moderate a panel discussion on Cleveland Housing Issues & Opportunities on Tuesday, January 23rd at 5:00 PM. Community housing leaders from around Cleveland including the CUDCThriving Communities, CMHA, Third Federal and Slavic Village Development will discuss local successes in demolishing blighted properties and renovating, reusing, restoring, and rehabilitating older buildings to serve as houses for local residents. The conversation is part of the One Community Reads program focused in 2018 on the book Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond.

CUDC Urban Designer, Kristen Zeiber, will be there to discuss the design/REbuild house and New Life for Old Homes: Design Guide for the Low-Cost Rehab of Vacant & Abandoned Housing. New Life for Old Homes is a  guidebook of low-cost, high impact ideas for the rehabilitation of vacant and abandoned houses that would otherwise be demolished.

publication

Cleveland Housing Issues & Opportunities: A Panel Discussion
Tuesday, January 23, 2018
5:00 PM
Cleveland Public Library – Fleet Branch
7224 Broadway Ave, Cleveland, OH 44105

 

01-18-18

Year of Vital Neighborhoods Kickoff | Jan 26

The CUDC will join the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability as they kick off The Year of Vital Neighborhoods on Friday, January 26 from 11:00 AM – 2:00 PM in City Hall Rotunda (601 Lakeside Ave). 

This event will feature dozens of local leaders working at a neighborhood level to make Cleveland more vibrant and sustainable. Take this opportunity to engage with and learn from these organizations.

This event is FREE and open to the public. RTA’s FREE trolley stops right in front of City Hall. Vehicle parking is available at Willard Garage at regular rates (and bike parking is free!). Photo ID is required to enter City Hall.

For more information on Sustainable Cleveland 2019, visit:  www.SustainableCleveland.org.

Year of Vital Neighborhoods Kickoff
Friday, January 26, 2018
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM
City Hall Rotunda
601 Lakeside Ave E, Cleveland, OH 44114

vital neighborhoods_kickoff

01-04-18

Friend of the CUDC, Chris Maurer of redhouse studio, mentioned in EARTHER article

TEAM

For their work with bio-materials, or Bioterials as they call them, redhouse studio and  principal architect Christopher Maurer were mentioned in a recent article for EARTHER.com titled The Cities of the Future May be Built of Mushrooms.  While maybe not mushrooms per se, redhouse is doing exciting research and projects  that use mycelium, the threadlike branching hyphae of fungi (think mushroom roots), to bind together waste organic matter like straw, corn stover, or sawdust. Some commercial manufacturers are already making materials for packaging and textiles (ecovative design and Mycoworks) using mycelium. redhouse looks to incorporate the natural abilities of the bioterials to insulate, provide structure, and resist fire to make whole structures. 

materialsMaterial samples for testing. 

Having worked in Africa for number of years in under-served communities redhouse hopes to develop techniques that address food security, water security, and economic opportunity, simultaneously with creating eco-friendly shelter. Mushrooms provide high protein food source with minimal energy and resource input and the waste from growing mushrooms can be used to make shelter and filter water and soil. See redhouse’s BIOSHELTER.  They are working with local chef, and fellow fun-guy, Jeremy Umansky of Larder Delicatessen to find palatable outlets of the gourmet mushrooms that are not always prized in the developing world.

bioshellInterior of bioshelter. 

Their newest project could use your support. In BIOCYCLER, redhouse imagines recycling homes entirely. By grinding up lumber, drywall, and insulation of demolished homes and using it for substrates for bio-binders, redhouse can save material from landfills and create new and green building materials directly on site. See their KICKSTER to learn more. 

bio-2

11-14-17

Associate Director, David Jurca, Wins AIA Activism Award

David_Jurca_4

The AIA Cleveland Activism Award recognizes local emerging leaders who are influencing a sustainable future of the profession by making architecture/interior design accessible and relevant to the public while both educating and learning from the broader community.

David Jurca has dedicated his professional career to enhancing the built environment through meaningful engagement with the local community. As Associate Director of Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, David guides the office’s professional practice, research projects, and graduate teaching with a commitment to equity.

David is a relentless advocate for his students. He aims beyond expectations to create recognition opportunities for aspiring leaders in Kent State’s Cleveland programs. Students led by David received Honorable Mentions in the International ULI Hines Competition, Second Place in Miami’s DawnTown Mobility Competition, the Excellence in Student Planning Award from the American Planning Association, as well as Merit and Honor Awards from AIA Cleveland.

In 2013, David launched COLDSCAPES.org to spur creative design in winter cities. He also co-founded Design Diversity, an initiative to promote people of color in architecture and design professions in Northeast Ohio. Design Diversity has organized local networking events, national speaking engagements, and the soon-to-be released Design Diversity Index, an online tool to track diversity data for design schools and professional affiliations in Ohio. In support of Design Diversity’s mission, David leads Making Our Own Space (MOOS), a youth design program that trains students to envision and build their own public space improvements. MOOS was awarded the 2017 Place Planning Award from the Environmental Design Research Association.

Beyond his professional commitments, David contributes to the Greater Cleveland community through dedicated volunteer service. He served on the Franklin-West Clinton Landmarks Advisory Committee, Friends of the Romanian Culture Garden Committee, Bike Cleveland advocacy campaigns, and the Gateway District Public Realm Advisory Committee. David has been a member of the City of Cleveland’s Near West Design Review Committee for over four years, currently serving as Committee Chair. This year, David was also appointed to the Board of Directors for Canalway Partners.

Congratulations David!

IMG_7294

11-14-17

2017 Midwest Urban Design Charrette: North End Narratives

group

Each year, Kent State University partners with graduate students at Lawrence Tech University and Ball State University for our Midwest Urban Design Charrette, a weekend-long design workshop where we collectively tackle an urban design project. Last year the CUDC hosted our visiting universities here in Northeast Ohio, working on the Akron Innerbelt redevelopment site. This year, we were all excited to caravan up to Lawrence Tech’s beautiful facility in Midtown Detroit.

Over the weekend of October 20th through the 22nd, CUDC staff and students, plus a few Cleveland State University planning students, teamed up with our counterparts at Lawrence Tech and Ball State, working collaboratively between design disciplines. Three teams generated distinct ideas for the future of the Oakland Avenue Commercial Corridor in Detroit’s North End neighborhood.

IMG_3409

The North End is known for its Motown past, its rich and collaborative arts culture, and its recent forays into large-scale urban agriculture. As development pressure increases in the Midtown neighborhood to the south, the North End could face new market demand and resulting development opportunities; however, many community members have specific concerns and ideas about what shape those opportunities should take. The students’ task across the weekend was not merely to generate realistic design ideas, but to do so while navigating a complex social fabric already existing in the neighborhood.

team1_axoGroup 1 design idea. 

Over an intense 48 hours, the students visited the site, including unique neighborhood assets like a schvitz (a historic public bathhouse) and an urban farm. After a team dinner, we all rolled up our sleeves and got to work. Saturday afternoon each team presented their initial ideas to the community, who had useful and specific feedback; the teams were able to take their input into their final design proposals. The final presentations, on Sunday afternoon, found a receptive community heartened by the incremental and pragmatic ideas for how to move their existing commercial corridor into a new and inclusive future.

team2_2Group 2 design idea.

The final design ideas will be shepherded by our Lawrence Tech University partners, and assembled into a report with ideas for implementation. We look forward to revisiting the North End again the next time we’re fortunate enough to visit our neighbors to the north (maybe to check out the Schvitz now that it’s open again!). Thanks to Lawrence Tech for hosting another successful Midwest Urban Design Charrette!

group3_before

group3_afterGroup 3 design idea.

 

11-09-17

Emma López-Bahut Lecture | November 17

photo ELB 2016

Lecture: “From landscape to project: Rethinking Gallicia’s rías”
Emma López-Bahut
Friday, November 17th
12(noon) — 1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

Join us this Friday for our 2017 Fall Lecture Series, featuring Emma López-Bahut. She will discuss how one of the fundamental keys to rethink the “ría” it is to involving citizens: from an initial awareness of the problem through to a decision of a democratic and responsible manner. Her research approaches the problem from different scales: rethinking the “ría” from landscape, city, and housing.

Housing

Emma López-Bahut is a Lecturer in the School of Architecture at the University of Coruña (Spain) and currently Visiting Faculty in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State University. She publishes and lectures widely on her two research areas: “Space, Art and Architecture” and “bottom-up” processes in architectural design at different scales, from housing to landscape. Her new book on the hybrid work of sculptor Jorge Oteiza —Jorge Oteiza y lo arquitectónico: De la estatua-masa al espacio urbano (1948-1960)— was nominated for the 2017 Premis FAD Pensament i Crítica Award. Emma holds a Ph.D. in Architecture from the University of Coruña, an M.Arch from the University of Navarra, and a B.A. in Architecture and Urbanism from the Technical University of Madrid.

Emma López-Bahut’s lecture coincides with our Master of Landscape Architecture Program Open House. So if you are considering studying landscape architecture, please join us for the full day. You can find out more information and RSVP here.

11-09-17

Steve Rugare Speaks at Cleveland Public Library

Designing the Great Lakes Exposition of 1936-37

Brid

Join Kent State University Professor Steve Rugare as he shares details surrounding the design of the facility built for the 1936 and 1937 Great Lakes Exposition. This complex was constructed on the shores of Lake Erie to celebrate the centennial year of the incorporation of the city of Cleveland. The Exposition featured sideshows, gardens, rides, exhibits, and the debut of Billy Rose’s Aquacade, a music and swimming show that later went on to great success at the 1939 New York World’s Fair. This event is hosted by Cleveland Public Library and the Western Reserve Architectural Historians.

Saturday, November 18, 2017 • 1:30 p.m. • Special Collections
Main Library, 3rd Floor • 325 Superior Avenue

expo-cover

Steve’s talk is part of the library’s four part series, From Bridges to Belief: Four Events to Focus on Cleveland History. All events are free and  open to the public.

335db73779c30fc815aac4d44a23591f

10-30-17

Urban Land Institute’s Gerald Hines Real Estate Competition | Info Session

jeffblog2017 Competition Entry. 

Lecture: “Urban Land Institute’s Gerald Hines Real Estate Competition”
Jeff Kruth
Friday, November 3rd
12:00 PM — 1:00 PM & 5:30 PM
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

This Friday, November 3rd an introduction the Urban Land Institute’s annual Urban Design Competition will take place. The competition asks graduate students from design, planning, and business backgrounds to collaboratively work towards a vibrant and financially viable urban design scheme in cities across North America. In past years, KSU CUDC students have worked with CSU’s Levin students, and CWRU’s Weatherhead students to compete for a $50,000 prize.

A lunch lecture at 12:00pm will give an overview of the competition with coordinator, Jeff Kruth and  former student competitors. At 5:30pm, an information session with free beer and pizza will ask interested students to think about forming teams. The competition takes place January 15-29.

render 32015 Competition Entry (click to view larger). 

10-24-17

Deidre McPherson Lecture | October 27

deidre_mcpherson

Lecture: “Art, life + community engagement”
Deidre McPherson
Friday, October 27th
12(noon) — 1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

Join us this Friday for our 2017 Fall Lecture Series, featuring Deidre McPherson. Deidre McPherson is the Director of Public Programs at The Cleveland Museum of Art and the former Curator of Public Programs at the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) Cleveland. In this role,  she creates and organizes a calendar of lectures, public discussions, film screenings, social events, and live arts performances to accompany the museum’s exhibitions. Embodying the Museum’s brand, these programs connect adult audiences to the museum encouraging repeat attendance and sustained engagement.

Deidre holds an undergraduate degree in marketing and violin performance as well as an MBA in marketing. Prior to working in the arts she held marketing roles for the Council of Smaller Enterprises (COSE), The Cleveland Orchestra, and Boston-based advertising agency Arnold Worldwide. In her spare time, Deidre organizes Sistah Sinema, an event that brings people together to view and discuss films about queer women of color.

10-23-17

Welcome Cat Marshall | October 27, 2017

Basic RGB

Join us in welcoming the new Master of Landscape Architecture Coordinator, Cat Marshall. A reception will be held at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative from 4:30-6:00 PM.

Professor Marshall joins us from Louisiana State University’s, Robert Reich School of Landscape Architecture, the country’s top ranked undergraduate Landscape Architecture program, where she taught since 2003 at the rank of Associate Professor with tenure since 2009. Professor Marshall holds a Master in Landscape Architecture from Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design, where she began her teaching career, and a Bachelor of Arts in Architectural History from Ithaca College. As a Landscape Architect, she maintains her own practice, CSM Design, LA.

We hope to see you there!

Friday, October 27, 2017
4:30-6:00 PM
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

10-23-17

Third Coast Atlas: Prelude to a Plan for the Great Lakes Region

commonplace_insideThe long-awaited Third Coast Atlas is now available. The hefty, large-format book was edited by Daniel Daniel Ibañez, Claire Lyster, Charles Waldheim, and Mason White. It’s essential reading for designers, planners, public officials, and residents of the Great Lakes Basin.

The book is framed as a ‘prelude to a plan’ for the Great Lakes region. Chapters describe specific issues and urban geographies within this large and complex area, laying the groundwork for future planning at the regional scale.

In 2016, the CUDC hosted a forum with Charles Waldheim and several contributors to the book, including CUDC Director, Terry Schwarz, who wrote a chapter about Cleveland. And earlier this month, Mason White discussed the Third Coast research effort during a lecture he gave at Kent State’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design.

The prosperity and resilience of every Great Lakes city is inextricably linked to the health of the lakes themselves. The Third Coast Atlas helps us understand the challenges and opportunities of Northeast Ohio within a larger ecological, cultural, and economic context. This will lead to better land use and development decisions for our region.

Cleveland-3CA-E-AnimatedLong

(Third Coast Atlas)

10-19-17

Habitat for Hard Places and the Ecologically Inclusive City

City residents live in the midst of many other creatures, even if we sometimes don’t notice them. Birds, bugs, bats, and squirrels are all around us. We share our communities with bigger animals too, like deer, coyote, foxes, and groundhogs.

h4hp_fox

(Source: BBC.com)

Life can be difficult for creatures in the city. Near my office in Playhouse Square, I often see birds on the sidewalk, killed in collisions with downtown buildings.

H4HP_birds

If we took the needs of birds in mind when designing tall buildings, our cities might be less fatal to our feathered friends. Likewise, city parks could include plants that support bee populations and landscapes that help small mammals survive. It’s not about handing over the city to wild creatures, but finding ways for peaceful coexistence.

My dog was recently sprayed by a skunk in our (relatively urban) Cleveland Heights neighborhood. So I do understand that sharing space with wildlife can have some unpleasant consequences. But consider the fact that a bat can eat its body weight in insects in a given night. Our bat neighbors play a big role in keeping mosquitoes and bug-borne illnesses at bay.

An ecologically healthy city creates a sense of symbiosis between people and wildlife. You don’t have to invite a raccoon to breakfast. Although you might find one in the self-service buffet known as your garbage can on trash day. But we should look for ways to help other species feel at home in the city, for their benefit and our own.

In Cleveland, a key habitat area is the Cuyahoga River. The Cuyahoga has suffered a lot of abuse over the years, most notoriously catching fire several times due to industrial pollution. The last river fire was in 1969. The spectacle of a burning river helped lead to the enactment of the Federal Clean Water Act in 1972.

Today, the river no longer burns and a diverse range of fish live there. To support these growing populations of fish, Cuyahoga River Restoration launched Habitat for Hard Places, an initiative to provide habitat opportunities within the ship channel. It’s important to note that fish habitat will  not displace existing businesses or disrupt land uses in the Flats. Places for fish can be tucked in around existing and proposed human development.

Cuyahoga River Restoration and the CUDC recently invited 65 people for an afternoon trip through the ship channel aboard the Holiday Cleveland. Participants included developers, property owners, ecologists, fish and water scientists, landscape architects and students, and staff from the Ohio and US EPA.

H4HP_23

(Source: Katie Slusher)

Jane Goodman, Executive DIrector of Cuyahoga River Restoration, narrated the tour. Where most people see vacant sites and development potential, Jane sees habitat. In fact, opportunities for restoring habitat are prevalent in the ship channel.

h4hp_water_3

Elaine Price at the Cuyahoga County Planning Commission and Doug Paige at the Cleveland Institute of Art have been conducting fish habitat experiments in the Cuyahoga for several years, including small habitat islands designed to float in the river and vegetation baskets installed within the metal bulkheads. These installations offer food and places to rest, both of which are essential to the survival of young fish.

At the CUDC’s invitation, a group of Landscape Architecture students from Ohio State are looking at behind-the-bulkhead design ideas to integrate fish habitat into Cuyahoga ship channel. Under the guidance of OSU faculty members Halina Steiner and Karla Trott, students in a Spring 2017 design studio looked at the specific needs of a diverse group of fish stakeholders.

Gar-oup_Plan

(From: The GAR-OUP PLAN, Christian Moore and Alexandra Lemke, The Ohio State University Knowlton School of Architecture, 2017)

The students developed a range of innovative design proposals for riverfront public spaces that would benefit both fish and people. A new group of Ohio State students will be working on habitat designs for the ship channel this spring, beginning in January.

fishfollies

(From: fish follies, Ross Rogers and Marty Koelsch, The Ohio State University Knowlton School of Architecture, 2017)

The CUDC was fortunate to receive a grant from the Ohio EPA’s Environmental Education Fund, which we’ll use to share the students work through a folio of postcards from the river’s edge. We hope this project will inspire fish- and people-friendly development along the river.

For more information, please contact Terry Schwarz, Director of the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative at tschwarz@kent.edu or 216.357.3426

10-17-17

Cleveland Public Library: Community Vision Plan Wrap-Up!

DSC_1165

 

CPL-service_areas_groups_web

We’re happy to announce the final publication of our CPL150 Community Vision Plan!

CPL all four books

For the past three years, CUDC staff have been working with the Cleveland Public Library (CPL) on their Community Vision Plan. One of CPL’s strategic priorities is to prepare the library system for its 150th anniversary, in 2019. CPL150, the name of the engagement process, involved 13 of the system’s 27 branch communities to ask what they need from their local library branch.

CPL faces a challenge familiar to many institutions serving communities in Cleveland: How can we best meet the needs of our patrons in a changing context of new technologies, aging facilities, and declining population? How can each branch custom-tailor its library experience to meet the specific needs of its community?

For each group of branches, the team engaged community members in a series of public meetings, surveys, open houses, advisory committee meetings, and targeted focus groups, for a three-year total of over 1,500 points of engagement. The team then produced a report for each group, summarizing the engagement feedback and the final recommendations. These recommendations included physical improvements, like interior reconfiguring or exterior seating areas, but also ideas for improving services, as well as larger neighborhood connections which can better integrate each branch into its surroundings. We summarized this overall branch experience into four distinct, nested levels: library building; library grounds; neighborhood; and library services.

Experience-Diagram

The final reports, from all three years, are on our CPL150.org site, available for perusal or download:

Group 1 (2015): Fleet, South, Sterling, and Woodland branches (Purchase report on Amazon)

Group 2 (2016): Brooklyn, Mt Pleasant, and South Brooklyn branches (Purchase report on Amazon)

Group 3 (2017): Eastman, Hough, Union, Walz, and West Park branches (Purchase report on Amazon)

sbklyn_engawa-1_edits for summary

entrance plaza

In addition, we’ve assembled a Summary Report which outlines some of the major themes we heard across most or all branches studied (Purchase Summary Report on Amazon). The design team found that far from becoming obsolete, our neighborhood libraries are more important than ever for the many ways they continue to serve their local population. Our library branches are information centers, community work spaces, workforce assistance centers, after-school gathering spots, and more.

Please visit cpl150.org for more information on our three-year collaboration with the Cleveland Public Library!

landscape front after

10-04-17

Kristen Zeiber Lecture | October 6

ohr-debris

Lecture: “Scaling Up: Design with People and Places
Kristen Zeiber
Friday, October 6th
12(noon) — 1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

RSVPs encouraged on Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/573039656153285/

In her talk, Kristen will speak about navigating scales, from architecture to urban design to regional design, in her exploration of the connection between people and the places they live. Work presented ranges from small-scale design/build to watersheds, from the post-Katrina Gulf Coast to post-coal Pennsylvania. She argues that across all scales, designers should work for people, and with respect for their relationship to the landscapes where they have chosen to live—even if those places have environmental or economic risk.

tva

sauget

Kristen Zeiber is a Project Manager, Urban Designer, and Adjunct Faculty at Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC). She has been with the CUDC since 2013, and contributes to the organization’s neighborhood planning, research, mapping, and student advising. She also teaches the annual Midwest Urban Design Charrette for Masters students in Architecture and Urban Design in collaboration with several other universities. She is on the Board of Directors and co-chairs the Scholarship Committee for the Cleveland chapter of ACE Mentors, a nonprofit extracurricular program which introduces high school students to the Architecture, Construction, and Engineering professions.

Kristen’s previous Community Design Center and Design/Build experience includes over four years post-Katrina at Mississippi State University’s Gulf Coast Community Design Studio in Biloxi, MS, with founder David Perkes; and short internships with the Center for Urban Pedagogy in New York and the Yestermorrow Design/Build School in Vermont. She holds a MS in Architecture Studies (SMArchS-Urbanism) from MIT, and a Bachelor’s of Architecture from Penn State University.

centralia

KMBT_C554-20140527164941