10-19-17

Habitat for Hard Places and the Ecologically Inclusive City

City residents live in the midst of many other creatures, even if we sometimes don’t notice them. Birds, bugs, bats, and squirrels are all around us. We share our communities with bigger animals too, like deer, coyote, foxes, and groundhogs.

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(Source: BBC.com)

Life can be difficult for creatures in the city. Near my office in Playhouse Square, I often see birds on the sidewalk, killed in collisions with downtown buildings.

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If we took the needs of birds in mind when designing tall buildings, our cities might be less fatal to our feathered friends. Likewise, city parks could include plants that support bee populations and landscapes that help small mammals survive. It’s not about handing over the city to wild creatures, but finding ways for peaceful coexistence.

My dog was recently sprayed by a skunk in our (relatively urban) Cleveland Heights neighborhood. So I do understand that sharing space with wildlife can have some unpleasant consequences. But consider the fact that a bat can eat its body weight in insects in a given night. Our bat neighbors play a big role in keeping mosquitos and bug-borne illnesses at bay.

An ecologically healthy city creates a sense of symbiosis between people and wildlife. You don’t have to invite a raccoon to breakfast. Although you might find one in the self-service buffet known as your garbage can on trash day. But we should look for ways to help other species feel at home in the city, for their benefit and our own.

In Cleveland, a key habitat area is the Cuyahoga River. The Cuyahoga has suffered a lot of abuse over the years, most notoriously catching fire several times due to industrial pollution. The last river fire was in 1969. The spectacle of a burning river helped lead to the enactment of the Federal Clean Water Act in 1972.

Today, the river no longer burns and a diverse range of fish live there. To support these growing populations of fish, Cuyahoga River Restoration launched Habitat for Hard Places, an initiative to provide habitat opportunities within the ship channel. It’s important to note that fish habitat will not displace existing businesses and land uses in the Flats. Places for fish can be tucked in around existing and proposed human development.

Cuyahoga River Restoration and the CUDC recently invited 65 people for an afternoon trip through the ship channel aboard the Holiday Cleveland. Participants included developers, property owners, ecologists, fish and water scientists, landscape architects and students, and staff from the Ohio and US EPA.

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(Source: Katie Slusher)

Read more…

10-17-17

Cleveland Public Library: Community Vision Plan Wrap-Up!

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We’re happy to announce the final publication of our CPL150 Community Vision Plan!

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For the past three years, CUDC staff have been working with the Cleveland Public Library (CPL) on their Community Vision Plan. One of CPL’s strategic priorities is to prepare the library system for its 150th anniversary, in 2019. CPL150, the name of the engagement process, involved 13 of the system’s 27 branch communities to ask what they need from their local library branch.

CPL faces a challenge familiar to many institutions serving communities in Cleveland: How can we best meet the needs of our patrons in a changing context of new technologies, aging facilities, and declining population? How can each branch custom-tailor its library experience to meet the specific needs of its community?

For each group of branches, the team engaged community members in a series of public meetings, surveys, open houses, advisory committee meetings, and targeted focus groups, for a three-year total of over 1,500 points of engagement. The team then produced a report for each group, summarizing the engagement feedback and the final recommendations. These recommendations included physical improvements, like interior reconfiguring or exterior seating areas, but also ideas for improving services, as well as larger neighborhood connections which can better integrate each branch into its surroundings. We summarized this overall branch experience into four distinct, nested levels: library building; library grounds; neighborhood; and library services.

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The final reports, from all three years, are on our CPL150.org site, available for perusal or download:

Group 1 (2015): Fleet, South, Sterling, and Woodland branches (Purchase report on Amazon)

Group 2 (2016): Brooklyn, Mt Pleasant, and South Brooklyn branches (Purchase report on Amazon)

Group 3 (2017): Eastman, Hough, Union, Walz, and West Park branches (Purchase report on Amazon)

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In addition, we’ve assembled a Summary Report which outlines some of the major themes we heard across most or all branches studied (Purchase Summary Report on Amazon). The design team found that far from becoming obsolete, our neighborhood libraries are more important than ever for the many ways they continue to serve their local population. Our library branches are information centers, community work spaces, workforce assistance centers, after-school gathering spots, and more.

Please visit cpl150.org for more information on our three-year collaboration with the Cleveland Public Library!

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10-04-17

Kristen Zeiber Lecture | October 6

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Lecture: “Scaling Up: Design with People and Places
Kristen Zeiber
Friday, October 6th
12(noon) — 1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

RSVPs encouraged on Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/573039656153285/

In her talk, Kristen will speak about navigating scales, from architecture to urban design to regional design, in her exploration of the connection between people and the places they live. Work presented ranges from small-scale design/build to watersheds, from the post-Katrina Gulf Coast to post-coal Pennsylvania. She argues that across all scales, designers should work for people, and with respect for their relationship to the landscapes where they have chosen to live—even if those places have environmental or economic risk.

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Kristen Zeiber is a Project Manager, Urban Designer, and Adjunct Faculty at Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC). She has been with the CUDC since 2013, and contributes to the organization’s neighborhood planning, research, mapping, and student advising. She also teaches the annual Midwest Urban Design Charrette for Masters students in Architecture and Urban Design in collaboration with several other universities. She is on the Board of Directors and co-chairs the Scholarship Committee for the Cleveland chapter of ACE Mentors, a nonprofit extracurricular program which introduces high school students to the Architecture, Construction, and Engineering professions.

Kristen’s previous Community Design Center and Design/Build experience includes over four years post-Katrina at Mississippi State University’s Gulf Coast Community Design Studio in Biloxi, MS, with founder David Perkes; and short internships with the Center for Urban Pedagogy in New York and the Yestermorrow Design/Build School in Vermont. She holds a MS in Architecture Studies (SMArchS-Urbanism) from MIT, and a Bachelor’s of Architecture from Penn State University.

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09-27-17

Greggor Mattson Lecture | September 29

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Lecture: “Who Needs Gay Bars? Why Planners Should Care And What You Can Do”
Greggor Mattson
Friday, September 22nd
12(noon) — 1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

RSVPs encouraged on Facebook event page: www.facebook.com/events/118361948853908/

The high profile closures of gay bars over the last five years have brought to public attention what the gay press has worried about for years: the geographical focus of LGBTQ life is changing. Popular and scholarly attention have blamed our “untethered,” “ambient,” “post-Gay” landscape on two factors: geolocating smartphone apps such as Grindr or Tindr, and the growing social acceptance of LGBTQ people. This talk challenges these assumptions for all but the most metropolitan gay cities. Almost everything we know about LGBTQ placemaking in the U.S. comes from four major cities with iconic gay neighborhoods, global financial institutions, international tourist draws—and only 15% of the U.S. population.

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This talk examines the gay bar as an institution in its own right, focusing on the role it plays in secondary cities such as Cleveland, Fresno, or Oklahoma City, and outpost bars that are the only gay bar within an hour’s drive of another. In these small cities, often in red counties of red states, smartphone apps are of little use and social acceptance is more elusive. Data include 50 interviews with gay bar owners and managers, site visits to over 80 gay bars in 27 states, a new national dataset of gay bar listings from 1977-2017, and a longitudinal study of San Francisco’s three gay bar districts. Mattson shows that bars in general have been squeezed in recent years, and that gentrification, changing leisure patterns, and corporate chain competition are more relevant to the challenges facing gay bars than narratives of technological or social progress. Mattson reports on several ways that urban planners, municipalities, Chambers of Commerce, and Convention Bureaus could support gay bars, and argue why they should start doing so. And he argues that we need to abandon planning stereotypes of LGBTQ people as the shock troops of gentrification or canaries of the knowledge economy, and start treating regional gay bars as social institutions in their own right.

Greggor Mattson is Associate Professor of Sociology at Oberlin College and the Director of the Program in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies. With degrees in sociology from Oxford University and the University of California, Berkeley, his research lies at the intersections of the sociology of sexuality, culture, and urban studies. The author of The Cultural Politics of European Prostitution Reform: Governing Loose Women and Before It Was Hingetown, listed among the best writing from and about Northeast Ohio from 2016 by the Cleveland Scene. He is currently working on a book about changes in American gay bars over the last twenty years. He blogs at greggormattson.com and @GreggorMattson on Twitter.

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09-22-17

Publication Release: NEW LIFE FOR OLD HOMES

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We’re happy to announce the publication of New Life for Old Homes: Design Guide for the Low-Cost Rehab of Vacant & Affordable Housing!

New Life for Old Homes is a user-friendly guidebook of low-cost, high-impact ideas for the rehabilitation of vacant and abandoned houses that would otherwise be demolished. The project was conceived in tandem with our Design/REbuild initiative, a vacant brick home in the St Clair-Superior neighborhood that was rehabbed by students from KSU’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design (and lots of community volunteers). While Design/REbuild could only address one house at a time, New Life for Old Homes captures the larger design ideas around refreshing Cleveland’s vacant houses to make them vibrant again.

Cleveland’s historic neighborhood fabric is threatened by the 1,000+ demolitions that take place every year. These houses form the basis of our traditional city neighborhoods and, while they may not have dramatic architectural or historic significance, they contribute to the familiar scale and character of Ohio’s cities. The goal of New Life for Old Homes is to repair, rather than demolish, and to rediscover the unique appeal that older houses have to offer. We hope the guide inspires Clevelanders to look again at our sturdy homes that are too good to throw away.

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New Life for Old Homes was generously sponsored by the Ohio History Fund, which supports innovative historic preservation projects across the state. We’re deeply grateful for the support of the OHF in creating this publication.

Please feel free to browse the publication below, and if you’d like to purchase a print-on-demand copy for yourself, you can find our Amazon link here. We also have copies of the printed book available for free at CUDC. If you’d like to pick up a copy, just stop by the CUDC office between 9am – 5pm and ask for the New Life for Old Homes book.

 

09-20-17

Ben Herring Lecture | September 22

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Lecture: “Source Material: Identities in Architecture”
Ben Herring
Friday, September 22nd
12(noon) – 1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

RSVP on the Facebook event page.

Join us at the CUDC this Friday, September 22nd for a talk by Ben Herring, project manager at redhouse studio architecture. His interactive presentation will explore meaning through materiality in architecture. The applications of architectures are no longer simple, nor simply for providing shelter. The uses of architecture include identities as concrete as defining the face of business (Facebook Headquarters, Gehry Partners), as personal as defining home (Incremental Housing Complex Quinta Monroy, Elemental), and as controversial as redefining our memory (Vietnam Memorial, Maya Lin). These projects are young. However, architecture is prehistoric. In turn, many well established views on the state of the art of architecture have been declared and deconstructed throughout architectural history.

The aim of this presentation will be to review an abbreviated collection of these influences on architectural history. This survey of trademark architectural definitions, agendas, and identities will then be used to provide a groundwork for discourse on how we approach architecture today.

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Clifford Benjamin Herring is a designer specializing in new materials and architectures for public good. Ben was administered various honors at Ball State University where he received degrees in Architecture and Economics. He has previously served as a board member for PBS and NPR member stations in Southern Indiana and is currently seated as the executive board treasurer for the Refresh Collective (the organization responsible for the Fresh Camp). Ben is a project manager at redhouse studio architecture where his work includes new material developments and various non-for-profit and commercial architectures. As a workshop director for the CUDC’s Making Our Own Space (MOOS) program, Ben works with youth throughout Cleveland, Ohio to influence their neighborhoods through design and construction.

Let us know you’re coming. RSVP on the Facebook event page and please spread the word!

View the CUDC’s full 2017 Fall Lecture Series.

 

09-11-17

Jacinda Walker Lecture | September 15

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Lecture: “Design Journeys: Strategies for Increasing Diversity in Design Disciplines”
Jacinda Walker
Friday, September 15th
12(noon)-1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

Join us at the CUDC this Friday at lunch for a talk by Jacinda Walker, the second event in our 2017 Fall Lecture Series. Jacinda Walker will discuss the objectives of her research work, “Design Journeys: Strategies for Increasing Diversity in Design Disciplines.” This solutions-based thesis presents fifteen strategic ideas to expose African-American and Latino youth to design-related careers. The interactive talk will reveal her research approach, illustrate the problems, share the design principles needed to close the diversity gap, and include the first groundbreaking updates on the Design Diversity Index project. Attendees will leave with a clear definition of this complex problem and a deeper appreciation of what is required from educators, parents, organizations, and designers of all disciplines to diversify our profession.

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The Design Journey Map, created by Jacinda Walker, is a tool to guide progress towards increasing diversity in the design fields.

Jacinda Walker is the founder of designExplorr, an organization that celebrates design learning by creating opportunities that expose African American and Latino youth to design. She also serves as Chair of AIGA’s Diversity & Inclusion Task Force. Walker has over 20 years of industry experience as a designer, entrepreneur, and instructor. Jacinda earned her BFA in graphic design from the University of Akron and an MFA in Design Research & Development with a minor in Nonprofit Studies from The Ohio State University. Her future goals include working with organizations to establish design education initiatives and to develop design programs for underrepresented youth.

For more information about the upcoming talk, please contact the CUDC at (216) 357-3434 or cudc[at]kent.edu

 

09-08-17

Watermark Project Summer Finale

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The CUDC, with partners Neighborhood Progress, artist Mimi Kato, and archaeologist Dr. Roy Larik, recently held their summer finale of events surrounding the Watermark project. The project seeks to evoke the memory of the Giddings Brook, a waterway buried and culverted in the early 20th century. Dee Jay Doc and Fresh Camp provided hip-hop entertainment, improvising lyrics about the history of the Giddings Brook, problems concerning lead in their neighborhoods, and other stories. Food, a rain barrel give-away, and an installation of the Watermark beach and pool also brought people out to the site.

 

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Giddings Brook is one of several waterways buried as the city developed in the early 20th century. The Brook holds history as a recreation, entertainment, and restorative place of gathering. Luna Park, a theme park, a Fresh Air Camp, and multiple healthcare facilities were located along the path of Giddings Brook before its ultimate burial. Watermark seeks to ask how else we might consider the use of existing waterways today, as well as those now buried in so many neighborhoods throughout the city.

 

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Watermark is made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

09-07-17

2017 CUDC Fall Lecture Series | Schedule

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We invite you to join us for our annual Fall Lecture Series at the CUDC. This semester’s theme for lectures and events is “ReMaking the City,” an iterative action that links the diverse range of speakers.

Most lectures are scheduled for Fridays from noon to 1pm and held in our CUDC conference room (1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200). All events are free and open to the public, but the Youth Maker Workshop and Habitat for Hard Places Boat Tour require reservations. Sign up for the CUDC mailing list to receive more information on how to register, when it becomes available.

We also plan to livestream our lunch talks on Facebook. Please follow Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative’s FB page to get updates on which events will be streamed online.

Check out the Fall Lecture Series schedule below or download an 11″ x 17″ poster (3.2 MB PDF). Feel free to hang the poster in your office or share via social media—we hope to have lots of new attendees this year!

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09-06-17

Katie Slusher Joins CUDC as 2017-18 Post Graduate Fellow

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CUDC is happy to welcome our new Post Graduate Fellow for 2017-18, Katie Slusher. The Post Graduate Fellowship was started at the CUDC in 2013 to provide a one-year position for a recent graduate holding a Master’s degree in Architecture, Urban Design, Landscape Architecture, or Planning.

Katie recently moved to Cleveland for the fellowship, making the transition to our northern latitude from Austin, Texas. She holds a Bachelor of Environmental Design from the University of Colorado at Boulder and a Master of Architecture from the University of Texas at Austin, where her design and research pursuits focused on interdisciplinary work in complex historical and social contexts. While at UT, she contributed to research on the infrastructure and migrant experience of immigrant detention in Texas. This work was exhibited as part of the Humanities Action Lab’s States of Incarceration project, a collaborative, nationally-touring program of exhibitions and engagement events focusing on the crisis of mass incarceration in the United States.

 

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Above: The scale of the floor graphic allows visitors to the States of Incarceration exhibit to physically navigate complexities of the asylum system in Texas. (Design and installation by Katie Slusher) 

 

Prior to her graduate studies, Katie worked as a designer and educator in Richmond, Virginia. She contributed to projects at a variety of scales, from wayfinding and exhibition design to architectural work for institutions including the Gettysburg Foundation and the College of William & Mary’s Muscarelle Museum of Art. In addition to her work in design practice, Katie’s interest in issues related to equity and education brought her to Blue Sky Fund, where she worked facilitating experiential outdoor education programming for elementary and middle school students in East End neighborhoods.

We look forward to engaging Katie in our CUDC professional projects and supporting the individual research project she’ll develop throughout the year-long fellowship. We also hope you’ll have a chance to meet her at our office or at a Cleveland design event sometime soon.

 

07-17-17

CUDC’s Jeffrey Kruth named 2017-18 McCloy Fellow on Global Trends

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The American Council on Germany (ACG) has named CUDC Senior Urban Designer, Jeffrey Kruth, as the 2017-18 McCloy Fellow on Global Trends. Through the fellowship, the ACG examines issues of “urbanization, climate change and sustainability, technological breakthroughs, and demographics and social change”.  Kruth will investigate “Postindustrial Futures” by examining strategies of managed decline in cities and culturally oriented development through urban design projects in eastern German cities and the Ruhr Valley.

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The goal of the fellowship is to examine the role of public sector and institutional coalitions in their capacity to foster redevelopment opportunities and the emerging cultural landscape associated with these projects. As in the US, regions in Germany have seen decades of deindustrialization and population loss. However, German strategies for redevelopment vary significantly when compared to the US, resulting in a nuanced framework for policy options and the proliferation of alternative identities.

This work builds on the CUDC’s extensive work with vacant land reuse in Northeast Ohio, and Kruth’s investigations into post-industrial cities throughout the US. Kruth will meet with researchers, government officials, and urbanists throughout his month of travels. Upon completion, Kruth will take his findings and build dialogs surrounding best practices for planning, urban design and development priorities throughout the region. Congratulations Jeff!

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07-03-17

Kent’s CAED receives four applicants from ACE Mentor Program

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For almost three years, the CUDC’s Kristen Zeiber has participated in the local Cleveland chapter of the ACE Mentor Program, representing Kent State University as a Board Member and member of the Scholarship Committee.

ACE stands for Architecture, Construction, and Engineering. High school students at eight Cleveland-area schools (7 in the Cleveland Metropolitan School District plus one in Warrensville Heights School District) participate in this after-school program every two weeks with industry professionals, learning about the design and construction of the built environment around them. These industry mentors introduce students to the many career paths in the ACE industries and take them through a design project of their own to demystify the process.

ACE chapters exist all over the country, but Cleveland’s chapter is one of the largest and is notable for its close relationship with CMSD and for providing significant scholarships for ACE students to go on to higher education. High school seniors in ACE apply for scholarships through a series of essays and letters of recommendations, and local companies and institutions (including Kent State, plus the Cleveland AIA chapter) support their continuing education through donations.

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At the end of each school year, ACE holds a banquet to award scholarships and allow each team to present the year’s projects. On April 26, 2017, nine ACE teams presented their responses to the RFP, which called for new ideas for making healthy places. Each team had to come up with a design, figure out some preliminary materials and construction techniques, and even sketch out an overall budget, and then present to a panel of local practitioners.

This year, ACE distributed a four-year total of over $118,000 in scholarships to 21 graduating seniors. Most excitingly for Kent State, though, was that the College of Architecture and Environmental Design had FOUR applicants from this year’s ACE class. We’ve had two CAED students from ACE for each of the past two years, but four is our highest number so far. This year’s recipients are:

  • Anais Harris – Architectural Studies
  • Michael Mascella – Architecture
  • Cesar Sandate – Construction Management
  • Isidro Villa – Architecture

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Kent State has an agreement with ACE to match any scholarships for up to four incoming Architecture, Interior Design, and Construction Management students up to $1,500 / year each. In addition, Michael Mascella and Isidro Villa split the prestigious Cleveland Foundation Ward Scholarship, for students from the Cleveland area intending to study architecture. We’re looking forward to adding these energetic young students to our college and hopefully continuing to grow our involvement with ACE further in the future.

Congratulations to our four CAED ACE students, and all the ACE scholarship recipients!

For more information on the ACE Mentor Program, check out the national website or the Cleveland chapter Facebook page.

 

06-29-17

Post-Graduate Fellow wins Burning Man Grant

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Working study model for design approval.

The CUDC is happy to announce that our Post-Graduate Fellow Jonny Hanna has been awarded one of the highly prestigious Burning Man Global Arts Grants for his fellowship project “Forget Me Not.” The project is one of 20 such grants awarded to community-based art projects around the world. This year’s projects will take place in Tel Aviv, Bengaluru, Budapest, Kiev, and Cleveland to name a few!

The project was born out of the Cleveland Public Library’s 150th-anniversary planning process being undertaken by the CUDC. The project will culminate as an art installation and piece of permanent urban furniture in the plaza space of the Eastman Branch of the Cleveland Public Library. It will be comprised of a multi-rowed fabricated seating structure, and a framing apparatus for a 17’x14′ window which will look onto a newly programmed temporary performing arts and gallery space. The project will be complete by early August with an event to come. Please stay in touch via the blog or social media (@ksuCUDC) and we will post event details when finalized.

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Image above depicting initial collage submitted with letter of intent.

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Image submitted for the second round of jurying.

06-01-17

CUDC Wins 2017 EDRA Great Places Award for Making Our Own Space (MOOS)

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Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative is honored to receive the 2017 Great Places Award in the Planning category from the Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA).

The EDRA Great Places Awards recognize professional and scholarly excellence in environmental design and pay special attention to the relationship between physical form of the built environment and human activity or experience. The Great Places Planning Award specifically recognizes the CUDC’s Making Our Own Space (MOOS) initiative, a youth program focused on engaging and empowering middle and high school students with the skills to transform their neighborhood public spaces.

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MOOS is led by CUDC staff in close partnership with a team of local and nationally-renowned designers. Focused on outdoor spaces owned by Cleveland Neighborhood Progress (CNP) and the City of Shaker Heights, Ohio, this initiative uses hands-on, on-site workshops to build physical and social infrastructure in collaboration with the surrounding community. Outdoor workshops organized by students addressed issues related to shared spaces, inclusive decision-making and helping to bring diversity to the design fields by involving youth from underrepresented groups. In response to the project, the City of Shaker Heights created a committee of staff, residents and councilpersons to increase leadership opportunities for middle and high school youth. The Shaker School District is exploring how to incorporate the MOOS placemaking workshop into its curriculum. The EDRA Award jury stated, “This is a great example of planning that involves youth in place making and community building.”

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Started in 2015 by Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC), the program supports the CUDC’s Design Diversity initiative by raising awareness in African American and Latino communities about the range of design careers available to youth. MOOS workshops expose students to design thinking and making, employing interdisciplinary approaches from architecture, landscape architecture, urban design, planning, and graphic design.

Making Our Own Space is made possible through the generous support of the Saint Luke’s Foundation, The City of Shaker Heights, and the Cleveland Foundation’s Minority Arts & Education Fund.

Follow us at: wearemoos.org
Instagram: @wearemoos
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05-31-17

WATERMARK: Summer 2017

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Did you know that Giddings Brook runs underneath the Hough neighborhood? About 100 years ago, the brook was buried in a pipe so that houses, streets, businesses, schools, and churches could be built on top.

This summer, there will be events and programs to help remember Giddings Brook. Councilman TJ Dow is supporting an effort by Cleveland Neighborhood Progress, Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, and artist Mimi Kato to mark the path of this invisible brook the following events. All will be held at the intersection of Giddings Road and Superior Avenue (right across the street from the Addison Library).

Mon, June 12, 2017
1-3 PM
WATER, PLANTS & WILDLIFE WORKSHOP This free workshop is open to all, especially neighborhood kids who are home on summer break. We’ll learn about rainwater and where it goes after it falls on streets, sidewalks, and rooftops in the neighborhood. We’ll also learn about native plants and invasive species. Participants will receive seed packets they can plant. We’ll also make and install animal sculptures to remember the wildlife that used to live along Giddings Brook. Free refreshments for all!

Thurs, July 20, 2017
1-3 PM

TEMPORARY WATER PARK AT WATERMARK 100 years ago, people could swim in Giddings Brook when the weather got warm. Now that the brook is hidden underground, we’ll try to recreate the experience of water with sprinklers, wading pools, and a sandy beach on the site. Come cool off with Watermark!

Sat, Aug 26, 2017
noon-4 PM

WATERMARK WALK & COMMUNITY COOKOUT A free event where residents can learn about Giddings Brook and enjoy lunch. This event may also include a rain barrel workshop with the City’s Office of Sustainability.

For more information: https://www.watermark-giddings.org/

Or call Jeff Kruth at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, 216-357-3433