Position open at the CAED

CAED_PR_jobThe College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) at Kent State University is seeking applicants for a full‐time Public Relations and Media Specialist. Responsible for the creation and publication of promotional materials, event planning and implementation, and social media account curating. The position will oversee media communication efforts related to student recruitment, advancement, and alumni relations.

The successful candidate is expected to have experience with multiple design platforms, especially the Adobe Suite, and best practices related to PR and marketing. They will also have a working knowledge of comprehensive digital multichannel communication strategy. This position will utilize an entrepreneurial mindset, abilities in graphic design, and an intent interest in engaging with others to achieve results. Many opportunities exist for collaboration with external and internal university entities. This position will be charged with developing those connections and working to engage the CAED within multiple communities. Alumni relations are especially important.

This position is located at the main campus in Kent, Ohio. For qualifications, requirements, and deadlines please click here for full job description.


Alena Miller and James Lennon Receive AIA Student Awards


Each year, AIA Cleveland recognizes excellence in design by inviting local firms and students to submit their best work to be reviewed by nationally renowned juries from all over the country. This year we are excited to announce that two CUDC graduate students received awards. Alena Miller received the Merit Award and James Lennon the Honor Award. Both submitted work from their Graduate Design Studio, focused on Cleveland’s Opportunity Corridor.

The studio explored new urban planning and design approaches for redeveloping the Corridor through adaptive reuse of vacant land. Led by co-instructors David Jurca, Jeff Kruth, and Pravin Bhiwapurkar, students developed alternative visions for the local neighborhood intended to establish connections with emerging economic development in the region. Of particular interest was the potential for physical interventions to build social cohesion, ecological value, and cultural resources through short- and long-term actions.

We spoke with Alena and James about their studio experience and design process. First, Alena tells us about her experience and her project, Urban Seam.

“The summer studio was a unique graduate experience, because it required a concise analysis of the current proposal for Opportunity Corridor. My design process began by identifying strengths within the Kinsman neighborhood that may be viewed as constraints and acknowledging that the existing urban fabric was not useless, but compromised. From this point, I developed a “sewing kit” of urban design strategies that identified formal and informal design solutions that were culturally appropriate for the existing population. These “patches and stitches” create multiple scenarios for future development in the neighborhood. Further expansion of the “residential patch and stitch” included a typology study and the design of alternative housing units that better served the existing population’s needs. The housing typologies met the required density for transit-oriented development while offering social and recreational amenities to the residents. Overall, the design of Urban Seam focused on the positive impact of the Opportunity Corridor on an existing population by creating design strategies that were culturally appropriate, transitional, and a catalyst for future development.” – Alena Miller

2Urban Seam, Alena Miller

9Urban Seam, Alena Miller

If you would like to see more of Alena’s award winning project, you can view it here.

James also shared his overall impressions of the studio and the design process for his project, Reintegration.

“As far as the Studio experience goes, it was a great learning experience. In general, I believe that the project itself was an excellent opportunity to share insights and generate excitement for possible design solutions in a real world scenario. Being from another city, it was great to see how open-minded Clevelanders are to improving the city with new ideas. The support and feedback we received from a number of city officials and project stakeholders allowed us to better understand problems relative to the site. We were offered an inside look at how these projects may develop.

I also benefited from having three studio co-instructors. They each provided expertise from different perspectives, forcing us to use critical thinking in making our own decisions for the project. All nine students collaborated well together throughout the semester and served as a great support system. The design language and principles learned in this Urban Design Studio reinforced and improved my understanding of Architecture and its related fields.

Reintegration_Reintegration, James Lennon

The design process for my work involved identifying key social, economic, and environmental problems that exist within the site. The solution was to leverage existing anchors and amenities in order to provide a cohesive site that encouraged user interaction through transitional “social condenser” spaces. Interaction with diverse community members will serve as a support system for people who have been recently released from incarceration. My project’s ultimate goal is to reduce recidivism. The design itself was a response to current conditions while also acknowledging the history of the site through various urban design interventions. The programming is organized to connect people with landscape, architecture, and each other.” – James Lennon

Reintegration_13Reintegration, James Lennon

If you would like to see more of James award winning project, you can view it here.

Alena and James both set high personal goals that extended beyond the studio requirements. It is evident by their achievements that their hard work and dedication has paid off. We can’t wait to see what they will accomplish in the future!




design/REbuild house nears the final stretch!


Things have been moving on our design/REbuild house this extra-warm fall! On October 17th Sherwin-Williams hosted a Painting Day at the house and a small crew of professionals painted the entire first floor & some of the second. They graciously donated not just the paint, but also their time and impressive expertise. Local sponsors like Sherwin-Williams (and Moen, and the Cuyahoga County Land Bank, and many others) really helped us keep close to our budget for the project – we wouldn’t have been able to do it without them. Plus, they helped us pick out some beautiful colors that really complement the exposed brick and original hardwood floors. It’s an amazing transformation from the beginning of the summer.



In addition to the paint, the kitchen cabinets & countertops have also been installed. We’re all especially excited about the red maple island made of rough-sawn slabs from Metro Hardwoods, which salvages trees from the City of Cleveland. Tim Roos of Rooswork worked with us to join and finish the countertop, leaving the tree’s live edge exposed. The house is full of these special details, many creatively reinventing salvaged materials to breathe new life into them – echoing the whole mission of the house itself.


We’ve also held two open houses for the local neighborhood & the development community, and it’s been fantastic to finally let people see what we’ve been working on. We opened the house up on Halloween for trick-or-treaters and campfire enthusiasts, and the following week held a happy hour for interested professionals and neighborhood residents. Lots of people have been curious about the project, and now that we’re close to completion it felt like a great time to show everyone around.



The great news is that the house is for sale! The price is being finalized right now, but if you’re interested in learning more about the home please contact Andrea Bruno at St. Clair-Superior Development Corporation: ABruno[at]StClairSuperior.org and check out the comp sheet for more details. Thanks to everyone who’s helped us out on the house so far! We’re excited to be on the final stretch.


Future City Sessions | Call for Submissions


Urban Infill is the journal of Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative. The current issue (Urban Infill 8) will be a series of pamphlets, bound together, that explore emerging ideas in urban design and city-making. Each pamphlet will correspond to conversations and public events held at the CUDC in 2015/16 under the banner of The Future City Sessions, sponsored by the George Gund Foundation.

We are currently seeking short works (text, images, or both) to be included in the first pamphlet on urban data, geographic information systems, and new design scenarios for cities that result from understanding and manipulating vast amounts of information.

We’re particularly interested in the older industrial cities of the Great Lakes region, but welcome contributions about other cities if they are broadly applicable to the topic or offer a useful comparison or contrast to Great Lakes conditions.

Click HERE to view Key Questions and Submission Guidelines. The deadline for submissions is January 11, 2016, 5:00 PM (EST).


ULI Competition Strategy Session | November 20

This Friday, November 20, from 12-1 pm the CUDC lunch lecture will feature strategies for the Urban Land Institute’s 2016 Urban Design Competition. Past participants recognized in the competition will be presenting their work and share their insights for competing in this noted international competition. Interested students for the 2016 competition should consider attending either the lunch lecture, or the ULI Team Formation session, also on Friday, from 5:00-6:30 pm.

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In past years, graduate students from the CUDC, Case Western Reserve University, and Cleveland State University have collaborated together to win four honorable mentions. More information on the competition can be found here.

The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.



Emad Khazraee Lecture | November 13


This week we welcome Emad Khazree to our Fall Lecture Series. Emad is a Sociotechnical Information Scientist and Assistant Professor in the College of Communication and Information Sciences at Kent State University. His talk is titled,  Mapping Digital Divide: Spatial Analysis of Information Access and Socio-Demographic Variables in the City of Philadelphia. 


This study is an attempt to spatially identify areas where provision of public library and information services are insufficient, by mapping the spatial distribution of inequity of access to information services in Philadelphia. GIS techniques were applied to investigate the existence of a relationship between spatial orientation, socio-economic factors and information access. The findings of this study suggest the existence of a spatial pattern in relation to disparity in the distribution of information resources in Philadelphia. A secondary analysis utilized the aforementioned findings to assess the existence of patterns of library service provision on a limited data set. The results of analyses indicate that in the disadvantaged areas of Philadelphia, public libraries play the role of Internet access gateways. The findings can be used to better locate the future public library and information service centers in the city of Philadelphia.

Emad Khazraee has held a Post-Doctoral research fellow position at the Center for Global Communication Studies (CGCS) at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania (2014-2015). He received his Ph.D. in Information Studies from College of Computing and Informatics, Drexel University. His research is formed around the interplay between social and technical phenomena. Currently, he is studying the relationship between digital technologies, new media and social change. Emad is studying the cultural differences in new media use and the relationship between social change and digital technologies. Relying on sociotechnical approaches to social media studies and conceptual frameworks developed in Science Technology Studies (STS), he is exploring the role of social media in social transformations. Emad also received his Master’s Degree in Architecture from the University of Tehran. In addition to practicing as an architect in Iran, he worked in the preservation of historical monuments and sites before joining the Encyclopaedia of Iranian Architectural History (EIAH) in 2006, where he was the director of the IT Department (2006-2009), with the goal of creating infrastructure for meaningful integration of information technology into cultural heritage practices.

The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.


Bill Willoughby Lecture | November 6th

Basic CMYK

This week as part of our Fall Lecture Series we welcome Bill Willoughby, Associate Dean and Associate Professor at Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design. His talk is titled, Changing Places: Affect, Activism, and Urban Refitting. Here is an excerpt from Bill about his talk:

“Every day, events affect the city and its citizens. This preceding statement points to the simple potential in all urban places to yield and affect changes upon people and things. The items in a citizen’s pockets or handbag form a geography of occasions, force, and exchanges than have small but precipitous influences throughout the city. Starting with the contents in my pocket, I can derive an affect theory for urban place. From these pocketed forms of identity, access, networks, and instruments of purchase power, transit, political and social affiliation, I envision a theory of affects in which the places where we encounter other people and things are subtly refitted through our actions—and the affect places make on us. This lecture looks at ways artists, architects, and urbanists refit places through art, activism, and other derivations of affect.”

Bill Willoughby is an architect, educator, and essayist. After graduating from Kent State University and beginning his architectural career in Cleveland, he served as an assistant professor at University of North Carolina at Charlotte and later became an educator and administrator at Louisiana Tech University where he served for 15 years. In 2013, he boomeranged back to Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design to serve as Associate Dean and Associate Professor. He founded the Community Design Activism Center (CDAC) at Louisiana Tech University and has published on architecture and urbanism from a cultural studies perspective since 1993.

Join us from 12-1 PM at the CUDC. As always, free and open to the public.

1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115



Commuting the Crooked River; Making a Present out of History


by Dax Roman Godkin

Morning. The river glistens with sunlight and possibilities. I paddle my kayak around a bend. A magnificent great blue heron rises from its quiet hunt in front of me in the river. I have disturbed its potential breakfast and it will have to seek different hunting grounds. The extended spread of the heron’s wings carries it into the horizon, two skinny little legs dangling along like an afterthought.

I am on the Second Annual Crooked River Commute down the Cuyahoga River. Organized by David Jurca, Associate Director of Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collective (CUDC), this trip begins at Kent State’s main campus and ends near the CUDC in Cleveland. More precisely, the trip ends at the river’s egress into Lake Erie at the U.S. Coast Guard station at Whiskey Island, site of the Great Lakes Brewing Company’s Burning River Festival. Many of us brought our own equipment, but there was a generous contribution of boats and gear from Mark Pecot from 41 North Coastal Kayak Adventures. Additional gear was rented from Dan Hudak of River Cruiser Kayaking.

The purpose of this event is to “promote the river as a shared regional asset for education, recreation, and sustainability.” Our intention, besides just enjoying the river, is to look for areas of improvement along the 50-mile stretch of river between Kent and Lake Erie.

The Cuyahoga River has the dubious reputation of catching on fire in the late 1960’s. This was not an isolated event. River fires were not uncommon in those days, but this particular fire became the catalyst for the creation of both the Clean Water Act and the Environmental Protection Agency. Vast improvements in water quality on the river have come about from the interventions of these governmental agencies. There are over forty species of fish that call the Cuyahoga River home, many of which live only in clean waters.

The group met for the first time at Waterworks Park in Kent. Most of us were strangers with David being the primary connection between us. I knew David because we had lived in the same neighborhood for a time. When I heard about last year’s trip, I made sure that I got myself included in this year’s adventure by consistently pestering him for months.
Another member of the crew, David Brandt, a Cleveland Heights native and graduate of Kent State who now resides in the Washington DC area, read about the trip in an alumni newsletter and similarly pestered David to be included. Sometimes it pays to be perseverant.

There was one return member from last year’s trip, Chris Maurer, a freelance architect and instructor at Kent State, who would act as our primary scout and guide.

We all said our hellos and had a little breakfast, then hit the water for the morning.

The weather could not have been nicer, seventy-five degrees, slightly overcast, with an occasional breeze to keep it cool.


The water through Kent was placid and serene. However, as we expected, the water levels of the river were a little low. High-centered on the bedrock and gravel riverbed several times, we scooted our way into deeper water or just got out of the boats and walked around the longer shallows. This did not take away from the beauty of the morning as we wound around the bends in this truly crooked river, talking and laughing, getting to know one another without the usual filters.

Conversations were often interrupted with the necessity to pay attention as we maneuvered through the obstacles and occasional obstructions in the river. We all watched and learned from each other, sometimes following in a member’s path as they had obviously chosen a good line through the potential stickiness, others going a different way as they got stuck in their path; the low water levels adding spice to the complex decision making processes.

We stopped for lunch and a necessary portage of the Sheraton Falls in Cuyahoga Falls. These falls are impassible for all but the most experienced paddlers.

Charles Frederick of the CUDC was in charge of the truck for this portion of the trip. Charles, a member of last year’s Commute, was quite disappointed that a shoulder injury kept him out of this year’s trip. However, his and others efforts as the support crew were invaluable assets to the trip.

A good portion of us rode with the gear in the back of the truck. We felt we were on a secret spy mission during the dark, jostley ride to the next put-in below the falls.

The next section of the trip took us past Akron and into the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Read more…


Students learn the design process at CMA/MOOS workshop


Last Wednesday we had the pleasure of working with high school students from the Museum Ambassadors Program at the Cleveland Museum of Art. We were asked to lead a workshop as part of the CUDC’s Making Our Own Space (MOOS) initiative. Created in January 2015, MOOS is an ongoing effort to engage Cleveland youth through hands-on design projects to empower and inspire the next generation of placemakers.



Museum Ambassadors is a twelve-year-old, multi-visit program, where high school juniors and seniors and their teachers gain experience in all aspects of museum life at the Cleveland Museum of Art and other University Circle institutions. Guided by museum staff and volunteers, museum ambassadors come to the museum for a full day once a month to participate in presentations, projects, and discussions relating to different departments in the museum. The program currently serves 80 students and teachers from Bedford, Hawken, John Hay, Lincoln-West, Shaker, Shaw, Strongsville, and Westlake high schools and the Cleveland School of the Arts.


We invited the group of over 30 students to participate in a fast-paced exercise to design a piece of furniture for the museum. Students were asked to imagine the user needs for different age groups, including themselves (teenagers), children, and the elderly. We led them through the whole design process from sketching and brainstorming, to design iteration and group presentations. After building a quick model in SketchUp on the computer, each team uploaded their design to an augmented reality app and viewed the model through iPads to see what their furniture would look like 3D in a real setting.



The final presentations produced some really creative ideas, crafted through multiple design tools and quick iterations. We hope that this intense, yet fun, workshop had the students thinking about a career in the design fields. To view more pictures click here.



Urban Land Institute Design Competition | Information Session October 29th


There will be an informational session to launch recruitment for the 2016 Urban Land Institute (ULI) Urban Design Competition on October 29th at 6:00 pm at the CUDC. The competition is open to graduate students from the disciplines of architecture, urban design, urban planning, landscape architecture, finance, business, and other real estate development fields.

The ULI Competitions is an interdisciplinary urban design and development competition held over two weeks in January. It asks student teams to conceive of development program for a real, large-scale site in a major North American city. Previous cities have included New Orleans, Nashville, Minneapolis, Seattle, and Pittsburgh. Teams from Kent State, Cleveland State, and Case Western have convened at the CUDC in previous years, bringing home multiple honorable mentions from the competition. To attend the information session, please RSVP to cudc[at]kent.edu or call 216-357-3434.

ULI blog pic 2

(Students collaborating from the 2015 team)

Delta Commons render web1(Rendering from 2015 team)



Mark Linder Lecture & Exhibition | October 19-23

amcity 2.5 card

We welcome Mark Linder as he presents a special gallery exhibition and talk titled, American City 2.5. The exhibition will be on display October 19-21, 9 am – 5 pm and October 22-23, 9 am – 12 pm. Mark will give a talk about the installation on October 21 at 12 pm. Both the exhibition and the gallery talk will be held at the CUDC. Following Mark’s gallery talk at the CUDC, he will be speaking at Kent State University’s Schwartz Center 177 at 6:30 pm.

Exhibition: On display October 19-21, 9 am – 5 pm and October 22-23, 9 am – 12 pm
Gallery Talk: October  21 @ 12:00 noon, CUDC
“American City 2.5”
American City 2.5 explores the imaging capacities of geographic information systems (GIS) as a mode of urban design. It is the most recent in a series of GIS projects that began in 2001 as transdisciplinary research on the differing capabilities, spatial logics, and disciplinary bases of GIS and CAD software. This project exploits the geo-processing and graphic capacities of GIS to transform the discrete categories and boundaries of census and municipal data into pliable, even plastic, relational images that can suggest new spatial networks, gaps, intensities, densities, and affiliations. We propose a hybridized, cross-programmed, and more efficient public services network that combines the scales, infrastructures, operations, programs, and constituencies of four underfunded, atrophying public institutions -schools, libraries, post offices, and bus transit- in the context of hydrology and economy. Our imaging techniques aspire to manifest dissensual and differential space in which “the people” does not consist of individual data points in a census of the population, and citizens are not units of demographic categorization or subjects in a policed domain of information. Rather, the people are reformulated as relative, unstable, and latent communities in an improper spatial mapping of an amalgamated, networked public institution.

McGill mural.2012.lores

Kent State University Lecture: Wednesday, October 21 @ 6:30 PM, Schwartz Center 177 
“The New Brutal: Images, Mies and the Smithsons”
What might architectural practice become if its primary means and ends were images? Imaging is a field of inquiry and possibility with fundamental challenges for architecture today. It is also a field with a history in architecture, and a clear beginning in the work and ideas of the New Brutalist architects affiliated with the Independent Group of 1950s Britain, most famously theorized by Reyner Banham as topological “image-making.” The New Brutal is increasingly pertinent in today’s world of dense, instantaneous, superficial actualities which are as prevalent, and as necessary to grapple with, in architecture’s production, reception and dissemination as in any other field.

Mark Linder is a Professor of Architecture at Syracuse University, where he has chaired the graduate programs, coordinated the New York City program, and served as Chancellor’s Fellow in the Humanities. His research pursues design theory and history considered in a transdisciplinary framework and is focused on modern architecture since 1950. He is the author of Nothing Less than Literal: Architecture after Minimalism (MIT 2004) and is currently at work on a book titled That’s Brutal, What’s Modern? on the alternative mid-century modernisms, or Miesianisms, of Alison and Peter Smithson, Walter Segal, John Hejduk, and others. He has taught as a visiting professor at the University of Michigan, Harvard, University of Illinois-Chicago, Rice University, IIT, RISD, and UCLA.

His most recent work explores the potential of image studies for architecture. As Chancellor’s Fellow in the Humanities (2011-14) he taught a seminar and organized an event series, titled IMAGES?Precisely!, which focused on the ways that the precise analysis, application, and understanding of images invite innovative research methods and collaborations, and promise to shuffle the presumed territories, limits, affiliations, and purposes of academic fields. A website, imagesproject.org documents the results of that work.




Havana: the future never happened by itself…



On October 7th, the CUDC hosted a lecture by the influential Cuban architect and urban planner, Miguel Coyula. Professor Coyula is on the faculty at the University of Havana. In his lecture at the CUDC, he talked about Havana–past, present, and future. He organized his remarks around a central idea:

The future never happened by itself. It was created.

As many have observed, Havana is a city that feels fixed in time. Yet everything is on the verge of change. Buildings, infrastructure, and public spaces throughout the city are crumbling due to the decades-long embargo, widespread poverty, and a complex political system that allocates resources inefficiently. As foreign capital flows into Cuba at an accelerating rate, local entrepreneurs and outside investors are beginning to transform the city. The long term cultural effects and the physical form of the city in the future are as yet unknown. And Havana’s future is yet to be created.



Professor Coyula is both optimistic and concerned about the future of Havana. He sees opportunities to learn from other cities; that every city can show you something, good or bad. But despite the outside pressures and international influences that will inevitably be part of Havana’s regeneration, his advice to architects and planners in Cuba is to:

Think Cuban. Be Cuban. Don’t imitate.

In the US, we’re on the outside looking in. But that too is about to change. Havana poses many complex questions…about architecture, real estate development, historic preservation, and infrastructure networks. We have a remarkable opportunity to both support reconstruction efforts in Havana with new technologies and design expertise, and simultaneously learn from the resourcefulness and tenacity of the many Cubans who’ve held their city together under difficult circumstances for the past six decades.

Havana remains a vibrant place, though the scale of disinvestment feels overwhelming at times. But there’s good reason for optimism and the US and Cuba gradually rediscover each other.

The Kent State’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design and the CUDC are exploring opportunities to engage our students, faculty, and research staff in Cuban design issues. In March of 2015, CAED Dean Doug Steidl and CUDC Director Terry Schwarz traveled to Havana with Jorge Delgado and James Thompson of the Joaquin Weiss Institute. The purpose of this trip was to observe the physical environment of the city and provide initial reactions about how future development might evolve. We also used the trip to explore ideas for future academic programs. Our findings are summarized in a report: CUBA_observations.

The CUDC is grateful to Kent State University President Lester Lefton who provided support for Miguel Coyula’s visit to Cleveland, and also to KSU Professor Anne Morrison who organized the event. Anne is organizing a study trip to Cuba from December 31, 2015 – January 8, 2016. If you’d like to see Cuba for yourself, contact Anne at amorriso[at]kent.edu for more information.


The Public Library: Designing a Community Asset

Recently, HBM Architects received national attention for their leading-edge library projects. The CUDC’s new Post-Graduate Fellow, Sam Friesema, worked for the firm and had a hand in the recognized projects. This is his story about his involvement and how he plans to bring his expertise to our work with the Cleveland Public Library and their CPL150 Community Vision Plan.

Before joining the CUDC, I had the privilege of working for HBM Architects for 4 ½ years. HBM specializes in library planning and design and has worked with over 300 libraries throughout the country. Libraries are in an exciting period of exploration where traditional library services are transitioning as technologies rapidly alter information access in our society. Libraries are becoming community centers and neighborhood technology hubs. Instead of housing books they now house activities, workshops, cafés, performance spaces, interactive learning areas for all ages, and yes, still a few books.

Libraries are an integral part of any city. As a public amenity, libraries build upon input from the community to construct spaces which meet local needs. While we can only guess what the library of the future might look like, several new projects give a glimpse into cutting edge library design. Four HBM projects recently received national attention for their innovative architectural visions of the contemporary library. I was fortunate to work on all of these projects at varying capacities.

hbm projects

Click on project name for more images and information:


Projects range in size and scope, from adaptive reuse to new construction. While each project is very unique, themes start to emerge as to where library services are headed: Open floor plans, flexible meeting spaces, technology saturation, less book shelves, casual seating areas, maker spaces, interactive early childhood literacy areas, all act to inspire the next generation of public library users.

Looking ahead, I am excited by the CUDC’s involvement with Cleveland Public Library’s CPL150 Community Vision Plan and hope to continue contributing to the library world in my new role here at the CUDC.

-Sam Friesema, Graduate Fellow


Matthew Feinberg Lecture | October 2nd


Join us this Friday, October 2nd, for another exciting talk as part of our Fall Lecture Series. We welcome Matthew Feinberg, he will be talking about Re-Making Madrid: Cultural Ecology and the Spanish Economic Crisis.

Matthew Feinberg holds a PhD in Hispanic Studies from the University of Kentucky. His research studies contemporary Spanish culture with a particular focus on the relationship between theatrical production and urbanism in Madrid’s iconic Lavapiés neighborhood. Combining the analysis of dramatic texts, performance spaces, urban planning documents, and the cultural activities of urban social movements like the indignados or 15-M movement, Professor Feinberg explores how struggles over cultural production are deeply connected to the physical and symbolic shaping of contemporary cities. His work has been published in a range of academic journals including, most recently, the Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies, the Journal of Urban Cultural Studies, and in the forthcoming collection of essays entitled Ethics of Life: Contemporary Iberian Debates. He currently teaches at Case Western Reserve University in the SAGES writing program.

Free and open to the public. Join us from 12-1 pm at the CUDC.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115



Miguel Coyula Lecture | October 7th

miguel coyula_2

Miguel Coyula is an architect, urban planner, and professor at the University of Havana. He will give a comprehensive overview of Havana from its origins to the present, ending with an open question shared by many people these day: What kind of city will Havana be in the coming years?

The event will be held at:

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
Kent State University
Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, Ohio 44115
Directions to the CUDC

Following Professor Coyula’s talk, there will be a light dinner catered by Earth Bistro Café featuring contemporary American cuisine with a Cuban flair. This event is free and made possible by KSU President Emeritus Lester Lefton, but REGISTRATION is required.

For any inquiries regarding the event, please contact the CUDC.