11-06-19

The Architecture Play

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This Friday, November 8th from 5-7 pm, the next act of The Architecture Play is presented at the John Elliot Center for Architecture and Environmental Design, Kent State University, 132 South Lincoln Street in Kent, Ohio.

The Architecture Play is a collaborative multi-annual project by the A+D Architecture and Design Museum, Los Angeles and Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design.

Processed as either verb or noun, ‘play,’ despite its numerous instantiations, never obscures the most crucial aspect inherent to all of its forms and shades: a raw potential whose explorative drive pushes the states of being and knowledge, as well as the pre-existent boundaries of the physical and metaphysical environment, in a constant effort to derive value from play. Intimately entwined, play has thus accompanied scientific progress since before the Enlightenment.

The Architecture Play, a collaborative project conceived with these oscillating definitions in mind, similarly traces the ludic elements of the architectural discipline while projecting the potentialities of play beyond its preconceived limits. In four acts—a nod to its theatrical definition—the project constructs a complex ecology of actors and networks, of things and thoughts exchanged, transformed, and assembled to probe new avenues for pedagogy, practice, history, and theory of architecture; not simply transgressing boundaries but moving them altogether.

Organized by Ivan Bernal, Clemens Finkelstein & Anthony Morey, with participants Taraneh Meshkani, Katie Strand, Jon Yoder, Irene Chin, Gary Fox, Jia Gu, Lisa L. Hsieh, Kyle May, Antonio Petrov, and Leila Anna Wahba.

Produced with the support of Faith Chrostowski, Allison McClure, Benjamin Cyvas, Max Hentosh, Nick Ingagliato, Austin Keener, Vincent Noce.

11-06-19

FedTalk: What is Behind the Persistence of the Racial Wealth Gap?

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Black households in the U.S. have, on average, considerably less wealth than white households. Why hasn’t this gap closed over the past half century, even with the passage of civil rights legislation? Researchers at the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland have found that, together with barriers including discrimination, the primary driver maintaining the wealth gap is that the earning power of blacks in the labor market continues to trail that of whites. That’s contrary to other studies which generally concluded that the wealth gap was “too big” to be explained by differences in income.

  • How can economics inform us about racial inequities in wealth accumulation?
  • Why has the wealth gap between blacks and whites persisted?
  • What can be done and how long will it take to actually close the wealth gap if we maintain the current course?

Presenters:

  • Dionissi Aliprantis, Senior Research Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland
  • Daniel R. Carroll, Research Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland

Moderator:

  • Jennifer Jordan, Anchor/Reporter, WJW-TV Fox 8

Panelists:

  • Stephanie McHenry, Chief Financial Officer and Senior Vice President for Business Affairs and Finance, Cleveland State University
    Randell McShepard, Vice President, Public Affairs and Chief Talent Officer, RPM
    Jill Rizika, Executive Director, Towards Employment

Panelists will take part in an audience Q&A following moderated discussion.

Space is limited. There is no cost to attend, but registration is required and will close November 8, 2019, or as soon as all seats are filled.

10-25-19

OUTprint / INprint: What does dignity mean?

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Tour and presentation by Malaz Elgemiabby
October 31, 2019 | 9-10 AM
Riverview Welcome Center, 1701 West 25th Street, Cleveland

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Malaz Elgemiabby, a Cleveland-based design consultant from Sudan, will discuss a public art project highlighting the potential of a future park overlooking the Cuyahoga River and the downtown skyline at Irishtown Bend.  The Welcome Center, used for more than a decade as a storage facility, is just north of CMHA’s Riverview apartments.

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Planners envision turning the one-story, gable-roofed building into a gateway for the proposed 17-acre park at Irishtown Bend that will take shape on a weed-covered slope downhill, once occupied by 19th-century Irish immigrant laborers.

Malaz’s project grew out of her participation in the Cleveland Foundation’s Creative Fusion program, which engages local and international artists in creative ventures in Cleveland. The project, completed in partnership with LAND Studio, is a local manifestation of a global initiative launched by the French photographer known as JR, who plasters large black-and-white photographs on buildings to broadcast the identity of participants. The work grew out of extensive community discussions in Ohio City.

This event is free and open to the public. More information: cudc@kent.edu | 216.357.3434

 

 

10-24-19

BAT CAMP: ASLA Student Award Winner!

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Congratulations to Katherine Kelleher, 2019 Graduate of Kent State’s Master of Landscape Architecture Program, for her Student Merit Award from the Ohio Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects. Her advisor on the project was Dr. Reid Coffman.

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The Indiana Bat is an endangered species in Ohio. Their population has significantly declined since the mid 1970s and continues to struggle. There are many factors for this including habitat loss and the detrimental fungal disease known as White Nose Syndrome. Bat Camp creates a space mutually beneficial for all. The structures create a habitat which supports life and prosperity at Acacia Reservation in Lyndhurst, Ohio. Katherine’s design addresses and enhances the broader ecosystem including plant and animal life.

The Indiana Bat is a hibernating species. From about mid-October to mid-March the Indiana Bat will hibernate in limestone caves in Ohio and adjacent states. The fungus of White Nose Syndrome unfortunately lives in these caves. The bats can contract the fungus here or from contact with infected bats. Starting in about mid-March the bats will emerge from the caves and start heading towards their spring and summer time roosts.

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Existing conditions at Acacia Reservation are accommodating to the Indiana Bat. The ecologically patchy environment provides diversity for habitat. The Indiana Bat likes to forage down long, open corridors. The wet meadows are part of a network of wet depressions and established wetlands which host diverse aquatic insects that the bat will feed on. The typical trees that host the Indiana Bat are typically along forest edges near water, or in open fields. The scale of the reservation provides several spaces for the bat to meet their daily needs.

The structure’s design is flexible and constantly changing. Layers of untreated wood become more habitable as it decays, opening up more space to occupy. The roosting spaces from the decay will come naturally – but there is flexibility to adjust the design to manually beat up the wood before being added to the structure to give faster habitability. The design is simple and responsive, allowing adjustments and change every season to better accommodate the bats.

The structure’s interior is built with copper. Copper has antimicrobial properties that radiate to adjacent material. This gesture is an attempt to slow down the spread of White Nose Syndrome. Additionally, the copper becomes an ideal hanging space for the bats once the wood has decayed enough.

Katherine conducted a series of sun studies to demonstrate the dynamic changes that the structures go through during season change and time change. Indiana Bats are especially particular to temperature. The scale, and multiple roosting options allow the bats to have ample choices to move around for ideal comfort and temperature.

Bat Camp uses ecomimicry to create a space for cohabitation at Acacia. This shared space is beneficial for the Indiana Bat, plant life, pollinators, people, and more. The design is adaptable from year to year, with the goal of becoming more mutually beneficial for all with each passing year.

10-17-19

2019 Graduate Programs Open House

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Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design presents
2019 Graduate Programs Open House | November 2, 2019

Explore graduate education at Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED). Whether you’re beginning a new career path or you have it already in place—learn about attaining your next level of education!

The CAED offers a wide array of graduate programs in architecture (including two unique dual-degree programs), urban design, construction management, healthcare design, landscape architecture, and graduate-level research in environmental design. Join us to learn more about all our graduate programs, meet faculty, staff, and students. You are welcome to visit the Kent campus and the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative facilities. You can choose to attend both locations or just one. Reimbursement for designated parking is available.

Saturday, November 2, 2019

Kent State University
Center for Architecture and Environmental Design
132 South Lincoln Street, Kent OH 44240
Room 120 (Cene Lecture Hall)

9:00 am – 10:00 am | Registration
10:00 am – 10:30 am | Welcome and all CAED Program Introductions
10:30 am–11:30 pm | Program Breakout Sessions – 20 minutes each
11:30 am – 12:00 pm | Tour of the Center for Architecture and Environmental Design
11:30 am – 12:30 pm | Lunch [provided]

Cleveland Studios and CUDC
1309 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44115
1:30 pm – 3:00 pm | Tour and presentation in Cleveland: Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design

REGISTRATION | MORE INFORMATION

10-17-19

Building Youth Power In Cities

 

Image credit: Cody Rouge & Warrendale Neighborhood Framework Investigators (HECTOR, Rodney Bridges, Marnesha Davenport, Khadijah Harris, Taylin Hodges, Skylah Pounds, Mouley Yusef Sabour, LaKendra Reynolds-Smith, Lillie Reynolds-Smith, Alexcia Stoner)

How are design & planning professionals collaborating with young people to build cities for the future?

Please join us for a special event celebrating five years of the CUDC’s Making Our Own Space program.

Tuesday, November 19, 2019 | 6:30 PM
Shaker Heights Public Library, 16500 Van Aken Boulevard

The event will include the release of a new guide to youth engagement and community design, inspired by the projects created by Cleveland area students through Making Our Own Space.

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It will also include a presentation by Jae Shin and Damon Rich entitled, Building Youth Power in Cities: Newark/Detroit/Cleveland at tha Crossroads. Jae and Damon are urban designers at HECTOR in Newark, New Jersey. They will discuss the triumphs and frustrations of inter-generational work to make change and build things in Newark, Philadelphia, and Detroit.

Free and open to the public. All ages are welcome. Refreshments will be served. REGISTER HERE

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This event is made possible through the generous support of The Saint Luke’s Foundation.

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Co-sponsored by APA Ohio. AICP Certification Maintenance credits (CM: 1.5 hours) available for certified planners.

Image credit: Cody Rouge & Warrendale Neighborhood Framework Investigators (HECTOR, Rodney Bridges, Marnesha Davenport, Khadijah Harris, Taylin Hodges, Skylah Pounds, Mouley Yusef Sabour, LaKendra Reynolds-Smith, Lillie Reynolds-Smith, Alexcia Stoner)

10-15-19

Stepping out, Stepping in

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Please join us for a lecture by Jennifer Birkeland on October 24 at 6 PM at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200, Cleveland. Ring the intercom at the Euclid Avenue entrance for access to the second floor.

Jennifer Birkeland is a founding partner at op – Architecture Landscape in Brooklyn New York; and an Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at Cornell University in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. She is a licensed landscape architect in the state of New York, a LEED accredited professional and a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome. Jennifer received her Master of Landscape Architecture at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design and has a Bachelor’s of Science in Landscape Architecture from California Polytechnic State University Pomona.

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Her practice approaches design problems by exploring the oppositions established by the vantage points of the two disciplines of focus, landscape architecture and architecture, developing design solutions that strive to disintegrate the subject-object relationship conventionally established between Landscape + Building. Prior to starting her own practice, Jennifer worked on a wide range of projects with the internationally renowned offices of West 8, OLIN, and Ken Smith Workshop.

CEU credits (1.5) are available to OCASLA members.

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, contact cudc@kent.edu or 216.357.3434.

10-15-19

River, Nahr, Río Exhibition Reception

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Join Kent State University’s College of Architecture & Environmental Design and the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative to celebrate the designers who participated in River, Nahr, Río, a collection of work by Kent State architecture students, which is currently on display in the Cleveland Foundation’s lobby.

The project was a partnership with the Cleveland Foundation’s Creative Fusion: Waterways to Waterways Edition.

When:
Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2019
5-7 p.m.

Where:
Cleveland Foundation Lobby
1422 Euclid Ave.
Suite 1300
Cleveland, OH 44115

RSVP HERE

10-15-19

Spaces of Conflict Conference & Exhibition

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October 25, 2019 | College of Architecture & Environmental Design, Kent State University

Our built environment has always been affected and transformed by conflict.

Consequently, design professionals are directly or indirectly influencing the processes of conflict through infrastructural development, urban and architectural interventions, planning policies, and public space making. By bringing together scholars, educators, researchers, and practitioners, we aim to debate, exchange ideas, and theoretical perspectives on the role of space in relation to different forms of conflict.

The Spaces of Conflict conference is organized as part of the 50th Commemoration of May 4, 1970 event at Kent State where the Ohio National Guard shot four of the KSU students and injured nine during the demonstration event against the US war in Vietnam and Cambodia. This event triggered many nationwide protests and demonstrations in other universities.

Friday, October 25, 2019 | Conference begins at 9:00 AM.

The day-long event is free and open to the public but REGISTRATION is required. 

  • Keynote Lecture: Felicity D. Scott at 5:30 pm
  • Exhibit Opening at 6:45 PM in the Armstrong Gallery.
  • Speakers: Silvia Danielak | Delia Duong Ba Wendel | Tali Hatuka | Samia Henni | Tahl Kaminer | Dina Khatib | Taraneh Meshkani Deen Sharp | Aleksandar Staničić | Hazem Ziada

PROGRAM DETAILS | REGISTRATION  | CONTACT

 

09-30-19

Sustainable Cleveland 2019 Summit

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It’s been 10 years since Sustainable Cleveland launched in 2009! Please join the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability for Mayor Frank Jackson’s Sustainable Cleveland 2019 Summit, October 16th at Public Auditorium (500 Lakeside Ave). Every year, 500+ community and business leaders, government officials, students, and residents work together to help transform Cleveland into a “green city on a blue lake.”

The one-day Summit will go from 8am-5pm, followed by an evening reception. The Summit will include remarks from Mayor Frank Jackson, keynote presentations, recognition and awards, facilitated discussions on key priorities going forward, and much more. The Summit will:

  • Celebrate Cleveland’s progress in sustainability and share stories of collaboration and action inspired through the SC2019 initiative
  • Recognize individuals, organizations, and businesses leading by example to advance sustainability in Cleveland
  • Feature keynote presentations focused on taking climate action, transportation equity, and creating a circular economy
  • Advance Cleveland Climate Action Plan priorities that depend on the whole community, such as reaching 100% renewable electricity, access to trees and green space, sustainable transportation, clean water, and waste
  • Chart a path forward beyond 2019

Please register by October 13th at: https://sc2019summit.eventbrite.com

09-20-19

Lunch Lecture at the CUDC

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Please join us for a lecture with Dominic Mathew of the Fund for Our Economic Future at noon on Wednesday, September 25 in the CUDC gallery.

For decades, industrial, commercial and residential development has migrated outward, but there has been no net increase in jobs or population to substantiate the regional spread. The result: Jobs are farther and farther away from where people live, which creates a disconnect between people and the economy. The disconnect exacerbates racial inequities, limits economic mobility, harms the region’s businesses, and diminishes the overall health of our economy. At the same time, we’re seeing an explosion of transportation solutions around the country, including ride-sharing, ride-hailing, van-pooling, and on-demand services. We are no longer living in a world where transportation options need to be limited by the choice between individualized car ownership or a traditional bus. This summer, the Fund for Our Economic Future, in conjunction with the National Fund for Workforce Solutions, Greater Cleveland Partnership, Cuyahoga County, The Lozick Family Foundation, the Cleveland Foundation, and DriveOhio, launched The Paradox Prize, a $1 million, multi-year challenge to invest in big ideas that help Northeast Ohioans stranded economically by their geography connect to tens of thousands of open positions. Learn more about this effort and some of the solutions that are being surfaced and tested through this initiative.

This lecture is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided and you’re welcome to bring your lunch. Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative is located at 1309 Euclid Avenue, on the second floor. Ring the intercom next to the front door to be buzzed in. For more information, call 216.357.3434 or email cudc@kent.edu.

09-12-19

ZeroThreshold Awards Event

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Celebrating winning entries from the ZeroThreshold, an international design competition for accessible housing. Hosted by North Coast Community Homes and sponsored by the Cleveland Foundation.

September 19, 2019 at 5:30 PM
Ariel International Event Center, 1163 East 40th Street, Cleveland

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Featuring a keynote address by architect Chris Downey.
Tickets available at ZeroThreshold.org

09-12-19

Collective Reality: Image without Ownership

Collective Reality

An Interactive augmented reality installation that engages citizens in imagining the Future of the Urban Environment.

A project by EXTENTS, stock-a-studio, and Mark Linquist.
Opening on Saturday, September 14, 5-8PM
5324 Fleet Avenue, Cleveland

09-12-19

CUDC Fall Lectures & Programs

Please join us for the CUDC’s Fall Lecture Series. All events are free open to the public.

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September  18 | Noon | CUDC Gallery
Quilian Riano, Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative | Negotiating Bodies

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September 25 | Noon | CUDC Gallery
Dominic Mathew, Fund for Our Economic Future | No Car » No Job, No Job » No Car

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October 2 | Noon | CUDC Gallery
David Jurca, Seventh Hill LLC | Design to Transform

October 7 | 5:30 PM | Cene Lecture Hall
College of Architecture + Environmental Design | Kent State University
Karen M’Closkey + Keith VanDerSys, peg landscape + architecture | Ground Control

 

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October 24 | 6PM | CUDC Gallery
Jennifer Birkeland, OP – Architecture Landscape | Stepping out, Stepping in

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October 31 | 9AM | Irishtown Bend Welcome Center, 1701 West 25th St.
Malaz Elgemiabby | OUTprint/INprint: What does dignity mean?

For more information, call 216.357.3434 or email cudc@kent.edu.

 

09-12-19

NEGOTIATING BODIES

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Can urban design help facilitate democratic processes? Political theories around Agonism describe the identification and negotiation of conflicts as a way to move towards a radical and diverse new democratic system. This new system arises from accepting that each individual in the system has multiple subjectivities, thus is able to create multiple political negotiated bodies. In this talk these theories will be used as a frame to look at professional and academic urban design work by Quilian Riano, founder of DSGN AGNC and new Associate Director of the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative.

Wednesday, September 18, 2019 from noon-1pm
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, Kent State University
1309 Euclid Avenue, 2nd Floor | Cleveland

Quilian

Please join us in welcoming Quilian to Cleveland and the CUDC!  This event is free and open to the public. You’re welcome to bring your lunch and snacks will be served. For more information: 216.357.3434 or cudc@kent.edu.