05-30-14

CUDC Students Place 2nd in International Architecture Competition for Downtown Miami

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Congratulations to Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) graduate students Jeff Jasinki and Matt Dureiko for receiving 2nd Place and $1000 in the 2014 DawnTown Alternative Mobilities Design Competition in Miami, Florida!

DawnTown is the annual public international architecture ideas competition for Downtown Miami.  DawnTown’s mission is to bring innovative architecture to Downtown Miami, and to tell the exciting urban story of Downtown Miami to the world.

The 2014 Alternative Mobilities Design Competition was sponsored by the Miami Downtown Development Authority (DDA). The Miami DDA’s Master Plan called for the promotion of regional connectivity and creative mobility solutions. This inspired DawnTown to develop a program based upon the alternative strategies people can take to moving around their downtown without having to rely on a single automobile. Using examples such as bicycle storage and sharing, car sharing, and ride sharing, they asked designers to create a nexus of where these strategies could meet and call home. This central hub would be located in a dense part of downtown’s Central Business District and would not replace the existing options we have; On the contrary, the proposal would bolster Miami’s transportation network.

Their project “Mobile Miami” stresses the importance of intermodal transportation as a growing urban trend in the city. The concept projects real-time digital information to communicate the availability of all modes of on-site transportation. This allows for absolute freedom of choice on how to better connect with Miami.

Jeff Jasinki and Matt Dureiko are both graduate students in Kent State University’s College of Architecture & Environmental Design pursing their dual degree, Master of Architecture and Master of Urban Design, at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative.

 


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05-30-14

CUDC’s Jeff Kruth to Present at CSU’s Historic Preservation Conference | June 5, 2014

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Cleveland State University and the Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs are convening an interdisciplinary meeting to discuss the role of historic preservation in revitalizing America’s Legacy Cities. This is the first event to bring together key stakeholders and decision-makers from cities where entrenched population loss and economic decline present difficult challenges for the future of the urban built environment. 

CUDC Urban Designer, Jeff Kruth will be presenting Thursday, June 5th, from 1:30-3:00 PM at the sessions titled: Industrial Heritage, Activism & Social Values in U.S. and International Legacy Cities.

Jeff’s presentation examines the role and legacy of public housing and urban agriculture as ways to preserve long-standing neighborhoods who may have valuable, though scattered resources in legacy cities, as well as catalyze growth . Recent pilot projects and policies pertaining to vacant land have created an alternative vision and relationship to the landscape in legacy cities with large swaths of vacancies. However, there has yet to be a corollary redefinition as it pertains to the unique challenges facing public housing development and neighborhood stability in general. Framed broadly, this presentation seeks to fit into a larger context that asks questions about strategies for declining social infrastructure in legacy cities.

The session will be moderated by the CUDC’s Director, Terry Schwarz, and will also feature Kate Daly (New York City Landmarks Commission), Anne B. Raines (Maryland Historical Trust), and Daniel Campo (Morgan State University).

For more information about the Historic Preservation in America’s Legacy Cities Conference and registration information please visit here.

05-27-14

Join the CUDC for a special lecture by Daniel Campo author of The Accidental Playground

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The CUDC will host a special lecture on Wednesday, June 4, from 4-5 PM. Author and Professor Daniel Campo will be discussing his recent book, The Accidental Playground: Brooklyn Waterfront Narratives of the Undesigned and UnplannedHis book explores the remarkable landscape created by individuals and small groups who occupied and rebuilt an abandoned Brooklyn waterfront. While local residents, activists, garbage haulers, real estate developers, speculators, and two city administrations fought over the fate of the former Brooklyn Eastern District Terminal (BEDT), others simply took to this decaying edge, transforming it into a unique venue for leisure, creative, and everyday practices.

Daniel Campo is Associate Professor in the School of Architecture and Planning at Morgan State University in Baltimore. Previously, he was a planner for the New York City Department of City Planning.

“The Accidental Playground is a deeply thoughtful, intensely observed, and challenging book. While it is completely grounded in one specific place, it succeeds in posing questions that are applicable to cities everywhere. What do urban humans really need from their recreational spaces? What deep desires are unmet by well-groomed parks such as the High Line? In an era of tight budgets, what can we learn from the no-cost, instant fun that people had for years at BEDT?” – The Atlantic Cities

This event is free and open to the public. 

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Wednesday, June 4, 2014
4-5 PM
CUDC
1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

05-20-14

Call for Participants | CIA National Conference | Deadline Extended

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The Cleveland Institute of Art (CIA) announces a Call for Participants in a national conference to be held November 6-8, 2014. They pose the question, what does it mean in contemporary art and design to be socially engaged?

The conference proposes to examine various approaches to social practices in both art and design in an effort to understand the concepts, terms, and varieties of engagement of the past two decades.

The CIA invites presentations of conventional and unorthodox forms from artists, designers, and scholars on the topic. Prospective participants may submit proposals for short papers or examine specific works or activities that address the questions as noted. Suggested related themes may include but are not limited to:

  • Socially engaged art and the new public sphere
  • Artists as activists: voices from the Great Lakes region
  • Historical precedents and present strategies of social practice
  • Urban design and design in the city as force for change
  • Aesthetics, ethics and politics
  • Student agency and society: 21st-century visions of the art school

Please submit PDF formatted abstracts of no more than 650 words, along with letter of interest and CV to: Gary Sampson and José Carlos Teixeira. Email to unrulyengagements@cia.edu.

Deadline for proposals is July 14, 2014. 

Detailed information about Unruly Engagements can be found here.

05-01-14

Cuyahoga Confluence Studio | Student Work

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This spring, a ten week graduate studio led by the CUDC’s David Jurca and Kristen Zeiber explored urban design strategies to reframe the Cuyahoga River corridor as an eco-tourism destination and regional spine for new sustainable development. Throughout the course, students worked at multiple scales to understand the complex economic, ecological, and cultural forces that would impact their design proposals. Students ultimately developed urban design projects that engaged this confluence of issues at two very different sites along the Cuyahoga River: Cleveland’s Scranton Peninsula and the Cuyahoga Valley National Park surrounding the Brecksville Dam.

The City Relink Project, by Carolyn Emmer and Adam Hirsh, evolved through a redefinition of Cleveland’s Industry for the 21st Century, based upon the rugged industrial history of Scranton Peninsula. Emphasizing sustainable industry, the site is proposed to house pharmaceutical and biomedical manufacturing facilities as an extension of Cleveland’s Health Tech Corridor.

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City Relink by Carolyn Emmer and Adam Hirsh

Threaded Paths, by Megan Haftl and Isaac Ocasio, proposes to transform Brecksville into an ecotourism destination within the larger network of the Cuyahoga River. During the research phase of their project, they discovered that Brecksville was in close proximity to another city, Macedonia, on the east side of the river. Both of these cities have tributaries running through them, creating an important hydrological connection between the two. Each city lacked certain amenities that the other city had, essentially creating a balanced destination, when considered in tandem. The routes that connect these two cities (both water and roadway) pass through the Breckville Dam site, creating an opportunity for the Cuyahoga Valley National Park to stitch together the two towns. In order to achieve the overall goal of making the site a destination within a larger regional network, Threaded Paths proposes a grand, multimodal infrastructure intervention to link the valley to surrounding tourist amenities.

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Threaded Paths by Megan Haftl and Isaac Ocasio

All AboardLinking the Region with Water and Rail, by Jonathan Nagy and Mia Katz, proposed the Brecksville Reservation as a new destination that makes it an asset for regional and local connections. The amphitheaters bridge these local and regional connections through its participation in what they proposed to be “The Music Line,” which utilizes the existing Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad. The line is to run from Jacob’s Pavilion in Cleveland south to Blossom Music Center, with the Brecksville Reservation as a central stop. The project proposes an ecologically designed area of flooding along the river’s edge, as well as a series of recreational services related to the new water environment.

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All Aboard- Linking the Region with Water and Rail by Jonathan Nagy and Mia Katz

Find more information about these projects and student work here.