12-22-15

The design/REbuild House nears completion at the end of 2015

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With major support from the George Gund Foundation and numerous other partners, the CUDC at Kent State’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design have nearly completed our first design/REbuild house. The design/REbuild initiative aims to recapture the value of vacant Cleveland houses that would otherwise be demolished.

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Our first design/REbuild house is at 1045 E. 67 Street in the St. Clair Superior neighborhood. Thanks to the efforts of KSU students and many community volunteers, we’re now completing the final punch list for a Certificate of Occupancy. The St. Clair Superior Development Corporation, which owns the house, is now negotiating with a buyer. The proceeds from the sale of this first house will be used to rehab another house in the neighborhood. We’re house hunting now!

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In the spring of 2016, the CUDC will release New Life for Old Homes, a guide book that captures rehab lessons from the design/REbuild house and other recent low cost/high impact housing rehab projects in the city. Thanks to the generous support of the Ohio History Fund, the publication will be available free of charge through the CUDC website.

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12-21-15

Point of View: Architecture + Migration

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Associate Professor, Steve Rugare, will be speaking at Museum of Contemporary Art on January 7th, 2015. Departing from the work of Do Ho Suh, Steve’s talk will look at  how immigrant communities have adapted to the built environment in Cleveland and beyond.

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Steve Rugare has been a full-time Associate Professor at Kent State University’s College of Architecture & Environmental Design (CAED) since 2009. In addition to teaching introductory courses in architectural history, he teaches urban history and theory at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) and the upper division courses in architectural history and theory. He has also coordinated the Master of Urban Design capstone project at the CUDC. Before 2009, Steve was a full-time member of the CUDC professional staff, managing competitions, coordinating events, and doing editing and graphic design. With Terry Schwarz, he edited the first two volumes of the CUDC’s Urban Infill journal. He has advised the Cleveland Design Competition since its inception.

Steve Rugare’s primary research focus is modernism in the communicative and planning context of world’s expositions. This work–drawing on a wide interdisciplinary background in political theory, philosophy, art history, cultural studies, and intellectual history—has resulted in several articles and conference presentations, and a book is in the works.

DATE:
January 7, 2016
7:00 PM

LOCATION:
Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland (MOCA)
11400 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44106

TICKETS:
Free with museum admission

12-17-15

Cleveland Climate Resilience and Urban Opportunity Plan

 

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Over the past year, the CUDC has been working with Cleveland Neighborhood Progress, the University of Buffalo, the Cleveland Office of Sustainability, and a host of local partners on an initiative to improve climate resilience in Cleveland neighborhoods.

Although climate change is typically considered a problem for coastal cities, the inland cities of the Great Lakes are also at risk of more extreme weather, protracted heat waves, and increased precipitation. The adverse impacts of climate change disproportionately impact lower income residents and the elderly. This planning effort focused most specifically on the needs of these residents through community-driven projects and programs.

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We had a one year planning grant from the Kresge Foundation that supported the work of a team of Climate Ambassadors in Cleveland’s Glenville, Slavic Village, Central-Kinsman, and Detroit Shoreway neighborhoods. These four neighborhoods were selected because they are representative of conditions found throughout Cleveland and in other Great Lakes cities. Our planning approach integrates local knowledge and community-based ideas with scientific expertise to help determine where programs and interventions will be most effective in combatting the adverse impacts of climate variability and change. The climate ambassadors received training in basic climate science and mitigation/adaptation strategies  They then served as resources throughout the planning process, recruiting participants for community workshops and helping to identify and prioritize ideas for projects, programs, policies, and future research that would help advance climate resiliency at the neighborhood scale.

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Based on this initial, nine-month planning process the Kresge Foundation has awarded $660,000 in implementation funding to Cleveland over the next three years. The George Gund Foundation has provided $40,000 in matching support. These funds will be used to:

  • Expand and amplify community engagement efforts and develop new and innovative ways to bring more diverse participants into climate planning and adaptation initiatives.
  • Build on recommendations in existing plans, especially the Cleveland Climate Action Plan, the Climate Action Toolkit, the Cleveland Tree Plan, Re-imagining a More Sustainable Cleveland, and the Cleveland Complete & Green Streets Typologies plan.
  • Connect with existing officials at the region-, county-, and city- level to coordinate climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts.
  • Leverage the city’s growing inventory of vacant land, to convert some of these sites into neighborhood assets that enhance property values and buffer residents against the adverse effects of climate change.
  • Connect with ongoing efforts in other Great Lakes Region cities to share lessons learned and promote resilience at the regional level.

Out of over 250 initial applicants to Kresge’s Climate Resilience and Urban Opportunity initiative, Cleveland is one of only twelve cities to be selected for implementation funding and the only city in the Great Lakes to receive this support. The CUDC is proud to be a partner on this important and exciting project.

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12-17-15

Historic Preservation in Legacy Cities

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In 2014, Cleveland State hosted a conference that looked at historic preservation issues for legacy cities. The term “legacy cities” refers to places like Cleveland, which are experiencing a level of population loss and vacancy that puts historic buildings and neighborhoods at risk. The conference laid the groundwork for a growing network of preservation agencies and allied organizations, including the Preservation Rightsizing Network (PRN), the American Assembly at Columbia University, and the Cleveland Restoration Society, and many others.

The 2014 conference included a day-long work session to discuss some of the unique preservation challenges faced by legacy cities. Preservation leaders from around the country participated in this event. Key ideas and  outcomes of the workshop were captured in an action agenda intended to guide collaborative preservation efforts in Legacy Cities. PRN engaged the CUDC to produce a concise and visually compelling summary of this work. The Action Agenda for Historic Preservation in Legacy Cities was released at a public event, held at Rutgers University in Newark in early December.

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As part of the release event, CUDC director Terry Schwarz facilitated a workshop to discuss national priorities for historic preservation in legacy cities from the Action Agenda and discuss the goals and framework of a multi-city pilot project for 2016 and beyond. The results of this workshop will support preservation efforts in Cleveland and other cities that represent the range of challenges and opportunities in legacy cities.

A follow up conference will be held in Detroit in June of 2016. Please contact PRN for additional information.

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12-08-15

Nicholas Rajkovich Lecture | December 11

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For our final speaker in our Fall Lecture Series we welcome Nicholas Rajkovich. His talk, Designing the Resilient City, will discuss the concept of resilience as it relates to cities, the expected impacts of climate change in Cleveland, and how our design processes need to go beyond just an examination of the physical environment to include issues like social cohesion.

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Nicholas B. Rajkovich, PhD, AIA is an Assistant Professor at the University at Buffalo. His research investigates the intersection of energy efficiency, renewable energy, and adaptation to climate change. Prior to earning a PhD in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Michigan, he was a Senior Program Engineer at the Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) Company Customer Energy Efficiency Department. At PG&E, he was responsible for coordinating a new Zero Net Energy Pilot Program. He was also chair of the San Francisco American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on the Environment.

The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.