02-29-16

Kelley O’Brien Lecture | March 4

This Friday, March 4th, at noon we welcome Kelley O’Brien to our spring lecture series. Kelley’s talk is titled, “Societies with No Form”, which is part of a larger initiative, Mapping Systems.

kelley_obrienWorkshop held at the University of the Phillippines

Mapping Systems is an on-going collaboration by artist/architect Kelley O’Brien and writer/academic Francis Halsall through a triangulation of Pontiac, Michigan; Payatas, Philippines; and Dublin, Ireland. As an interdisciplinary project conceived in the spirit of a meaningful exchange between practice and theory, they explore methods of representing the operations and experience of social systems through creative practices. In short, they investigate and develop methods of giving aesthetic forms to society and real-life situations.

kelley_obrien_2Performance:”Resurrection of the Clinton River”

Kelley O’Brien (b. 1987) is an interdisciplinary artist who lives and works in Cleveland, Ohio; where she is the co-director of the alternative art space The Muted Horn. She holds a Bachelors of Architecture from the University of Tennessee and a Masters of Fine Arts in Three-Dimensional Design from Cranbrook Academy of Art. In 2014 she was awarded a Fulbright to live and work in Quezon City in the Philippines where her work was exhibited as part of the international exhibition “Hold Everything Dear” at the University of the Philippines Film Institute. Kelley O’Brien has had residencies at the Irish Museum of Modern Art (Dublin, 2015), Green Papaya Art Space (Quezon City, 2014), and Hattie Carthan Community Garden (NYC, 2013).

The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.

 

02-29-16

Five teams from the CUDC compete at this year’s ULI Competition

Twenty five students from the CUDC, Case Western (CWRU) and Cleveland State University (CSU) recently participated in a two week urban design competition. The students worked cooperatively across disciplines and schools in the fields of design, finance and urban planning to neighborhood scale development proposals. This year, five teams formed at the CUDC.

2016 images for web-2Team Midblocks 

Sponsored by the Urban Land Institute (ULI), the Gerald D. Hines Urban Design Competition asks graduate students to design and finance a hypothetical solution for a site in an American city. Students compete for a grand prize of $50,000 for their schemes. In recent years, the Cleveland teams have won multiple honorable mention accolades in a very competitive field.

2016 images for web-6Team Atlanta Slopes

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Team Coeur

This year’s competition asked students to determine solutions for Atlanta’s Midtown neighborhood near the Georgia Institute of Technology. Student schemes included solutions focused around multi-modal transit, redevelopment of the 1.4 million SF Bank of America Plaza, green space strategies, and mixed-use development near Midtown’s Technology Square. Students were guided through the fast paced competition with assistance from faculty, staff, and numerous professionals from the Northeast Ohio region.

green springTeam Greenspring

alantechTeam Atlantech

 

02-29-16

2016 COLDSCAPES//Adapt Competition Winners

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On behalf of The Center for Outdoor Living Design (COLD) and the esteemed competition jury, we are pleased to announce the winners and honorable mentions selected for this year’s COLDSCAPES//Adapt Competition! The competition sought submissions that creatively respond to the challenges posed by volatile weather conditions in winter cities.

The three winning entries and six honorable mentions were selected by a panel of jurors from the United States and Canada, representing multiple disciplines, including architecture, landscape architecture, and urban planning.

Winners:
1st Place:
Climate Canopy | Thomas Hinterholzer – Innsbruck, Austria

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This project operates within the notions of comfort and energy. It proposes individual energy autonomy and takes a speculative approach in order to link urban energy networks with cold-cliamte outdoor activity. The anticipated technological assets are hydrogen and graphene. Hydrogen is the most efficient lifting gas with a lifting capacity of 1.2kg/m³. Its energy content is 3 times higher than fuel oil or natural gas and it can be produced efficiently and stored safely with new graphene materials. One atom thick graphene sheets are 95% transparent and 200 times stronger than steel. Developed canopies harvest renewable electricity from hydrogen, which can be used for the existing buildings. Various configurations of the canopy are used not only to produce electricity, but to overcome local uncomfortable climatic conditions in order to attain more possibilities for outdoor activity. Because the canopy structures are integrated within the existing built environment they work on the scale of a parcel or a block. It will bring the energy generation into a dialogue with outdoor comfort. This ambitious endeavor has the potential to change the energy household and urban activity of a whole city.

2nd Place:
Threshold | Catherine Joseph – Auburn, Maine

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Click to view larger.THRESHOLD_3

Freeze/Thaw cycles in the Northeast are inevitable. With these micro-scale processes come ideal conditions for the subgrade build-up of ice lenses that displace soil and fracture rock through a process called “ice heaving”. This process is notorious for demolishing roads and cracking building foundations. Portland, Maine serves as a representative of urban areas that endure widely variable winter conditions. The physics behind frost heaves is predictable. By leveraging the anticipation of the formation of ice lenses, THRESHOLD is a series of independent processes activated by the cyclic build-up of snow and ice that is comes with the freeze and thaw cycles of Maine winters. Facades expand and retract according to the snow build-up, increasing the volume of the air-gap insulation. Walkways warm as the frost heaves activate piezoelectric panels that power underground heating coils. The vertical forces caused by the ice lenses can also be tailored to artistic endeavors – underground organs play the sounds of friction and temperature. Water forced to the surface is directed to ice pools, where ice sculptures are created and encouraged by the upward thrust of the freeze/thaw cycles. In each instance, it is the threshold between frozen and unfrozen that triggers the adaptive urban features.

3rd Place:
The Eddy | Tiffany Chen and Matthew Enos – Minneapolis, Minnesotawinter_render

final diagram

Click to view larger. 

Winter is isolating. It severs links between individuals and communities. Minneapolis is accustomed to this. The Stone Arch Bridge in Minneapolis serves as a popular link between neighborhoods, and facilitates encounters. However these opportunities are lost during the extreme Minnesota winter, when few people regularly cross the bridge, due to brutal wind chills. The Eddy acts as respite from winter, not removal. The principal aspect of the design is a series of louvred railing systems. Louvres on the northern face of the bridge close or open, depending on season, to block the bittern winds from the Mississippi below. Thus, they create a calmer, more amenable environment for winter users. The illuminated bridge acts as a beacon in the darkest point of the year. Minimal structural supports modify the rhythm the louvres create, while ‘eddies’ punctuate the length of the bridge. Three minor eddies provide integrated semi-sheltered seating, while the large, main eddy provides a screened space with integrated seating and observation areas.  The eddy establishes the bridge as a winter destination and experience just as much as it is during summer.

Read more…

02-29-16

Ohio History Fund / New Life for Old Houses

OHC_HistoryFund2016_WSNY_560

The Ohio History Fund supports innovative historic preservation projects across the state. Please consider donating to the Fund. It’s easy. Just look for “Ohio History Fund” on your Ohio tax return and designate a dollar amount. That’s it! Your tax-deductible donation goes to support history projects in local Ohio communities.

OHF_newlife_cover

The Ohio History Fund is a generous sponsor of the CUDC’s soon-to-be released publication, New Life for Old Homes. This guide contains ideas and advice for rehabbing vacant and abandoned housing that might otherwise be demolished. It includes recommendations and lessons-learned from Kent State University’s first design re/Build project—a beautiful reclaimed home at 1045 E. 67th Street in Cleveland’s St, Clair Superior neighborhood. The renovations to the design re/Build house were designed and implemented by undergraduate students from the KSU’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design, with the help of dozens of community volunteers. We’re currently completing the final punch list and the house is available for sale. Contact us at cudc[at]kent.edu if you’re interested in this very special property.

And look for the release of New Life for Old Homes later this spring.

02-22-16

Doug Steidl Lecture | February 26

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This Friday, February 26th at noon, we welcome Doug Steidl, Dean of the Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design. Doug’s talk, “International Travel and Lessons Learned”, will emphasize that learning about and understanding cultural subtleties, and some not so subtle, will facilitate both practical aspects for relationship building and a broader understanding of global perspectives.Doug3

Mr. Steidl was a practicing architect for 35 years. He was a founding partner of Braun & Steidl Architects in Akron, Ohio, a position he held from 1983 to 2007. Before joining Kent State, he served as manager of Renard, LLC, an investment, development and consulting company. His career also includes working at John David Jones & Associates as designer, project manager and director of architecture; the U.S. Navy Civil Engineering Corps; Allegheny County Redevelopment Authority in Pittsburgh, PA; and the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company. Over the course of his career, he was elected National President of the American Institute of Architects, and served as President of the National Architectural Accrediting Board. Mr. Steidl is a Registered Architect with the State of Ohio (23 jurisdictions previously).

The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.

 

02-08-16

Felipe Correa Lecture | February 11

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This week we will be holding our Spring Lecture Series on Thursday, February 11th, at 12:15 PM, here at the CUDC. We welcome architect, urbanist, and Harvard Associate Professor, Felipe Correa. Felipe’s talk, “Urbanism Primer: Approaches to City Design in the 21st Century”, will provide an overview of the most salient modes of practice currently being applied to the contemporary city. By presenting a series of projects that range in scale and ambition, the lecture showcases the rich instrumental diversity afforded by design and its ability to confront diverse urban scenarios.

correa__mex_strategiesProject Constellation for Mexico City. From Mexico City: Between Geometry and Geography. Courtesy of Felipe Correa

Felipe Correa is Associate Professor in the Department of Urban Planning and Design and Director of the Urban Design Degree Program at Harvard University. A New York-based architect and urbanist, Correa works at the confluence of Architecture, Urbanism and Infrastructure. Through his design practice, Somatic Collaborative, he has developed design projects and consultancies with the public and private sector in multiple cities and regions across the globe, including Mexico City, New Orleans, Quito, Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Seoul among many others.

If you can’t make it to our afternoon lecture, Felipe will be also speaking at the Kent State University Main Campus, Kiva Auditorium at 6:00 PM, Thursday, February 11th. His lecture is titled, “Elective Affinities: Architecture Across Scales”. Both are free and open to the public.

 

02-02-16

Casey Poe | February 5

Spring Lecture Poster_CaseyPoe

Join us this Friday, February 5th, at noon for our Spring Lecture Series. We will be welcoming MArch + MUD student, Casey Poe, for an interesting talk from the student perspective. She will be talking about her experiences as a student in Florence, Italy during the Fall 2015 semester. She will be sharing her travels, living in Florence and the ways in which she grew to understand the city within multiple contextual scales: from the larger European scale (in conjunction with her field study trips) down to the scale of her individual experience in finding a home in Florence.

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Casey Poe is in her first year of the Masters of Architecture and Urban Design dual degree program. She grew up east of Cleveland, but completed my Bachelor of Arts in Architecture from Ball State University in Indiana. The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.

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