09-26-16

Norman Krumholz | Sept 30

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This week we welcome Norman Krumholz to our Fall Lecture Series. His talk, “Cleveland Neighborhoods in Black and White” will explore equity planning, a theory of urban planning that Norman and his staff practiced with three Cleveland mayors (Stokes, Perk, and Kucinich) in the 1970s.  He will also talk about how an equity planner thinks about certain issues and the results of their work in Cleveland.

Norman Krumholz is a Professor in the Levin College of Urban Affairs at Cleveland State University who earned his planning degree at Cornell. Prior to this, he served as a planning practitioner in Ithaca, Pittsburgh, and Cleveland. He served as Planning Director for the City of Cleveland from 1969-1979 under Mayors Carl B. Stokes, Ralph J. Perk, and Dennis Kucinich. 

Join us, Friday, September 30th, from 12 -1 PM. As always, this lecture is free and open to the public.

 

09-20-16

CUDC welcomes Post Graduate Fellow | Jonny Hanna

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The CUDC created the Post Graduate fellowship as a one-year position for recent graduates holding a Master’s degree in Architecture, Urban Design, Landscape Architecture, or Planning. This year we welcome Jonny Hanna as our Post Graduate Fellow.

Jonny is a Detroit-based real estate developer, architect, and urban designer. He earned his B.S. Architecture and Master of Urban Design from the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Michigan. He has worked in varies design firm in and around the Detroit area, most recently working for A(n) Office on the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale for the U.S. Pavilion. He has previously worked for Clement Blanchet Architecture in Paris and Etchen Gumma Limited in Detroit. He has lectured and been an invited guest critic at Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning and Columbia Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation. His work has been featured on I Made That, Students of Architecture, Arquisemteta, and Paprika! His research focuses on alternative means of representation for projective urban conditions including, cartography, photography, videography and short story narrative writing.

We’re excited to have Jonny on board!

09-15-16

Mark Souther | Sept 23

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On September 23rd we welcome Mark Souther to our Fall Lecture Series. His talk is titled, “Cleveland Historical at Five: Reflections on a Half-Decade of Curating the City”. He will be speaking at the CUDC from 12 – 1 PM. This lecture is free and open to the public.

Souther shares the pioneering history app that curates Cleveland through hundreds of location-based stories. He also suggests the transformative place-making and community-building potential of digital storytelling.

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Mark Souther is Professor of History and Director of the Center for Public History + Digital Humanities at Cleveland State University. He directs the Cleveland Historical app project and is the author of a number of books and articles on American urban history.

If you can not make the lecture we will be live streaming the talk on our Facebook page starting 12 PM. 

09-15-16

Charles Waldheim | Oct 6

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Charles Waldheim is a Canadian-American architect and urbanist. Waldheim’s research examines the relations between landscape, ecology, and contemporary urbanism. He is an author, editor, or co-editor of numerous books, including the soon to be published, Third Coast Atlas. Join us on October 6, 2016 at 5:30 PM. This event is free and open to the public, but RSVP is requested.

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Measuring over 10,000 miles, the Great Lakes coastline, known as the “third coast,” is longer than the Atlantic and Pacific coastlines of the United States combined. It is difficult to overstate the history and future of the region as both a contested and opportunistic site for urbanism. Envisaged as a comprehensive “atlas,” this publication comprises in-depth analysis of the landscapes, hydrology, infrastructure, urban form, and ecologies of the region, delivered through a series of analytical cartographies supported by scholarly and design research from internationally renowned scholars, photographers, and practitioners from the disciplines of architecture, landscape, geography, planning, and ecology.

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Following Waldheim’s presentation, there will be a panel discussion with several contributors to the Third Coast Atlas, including:

 Steve Litt, art and architecture critic at the Plain Dealer will moderate the discussion.

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The Future City Sessions are an on-going explore of emerging ideas in urban design and city-making made possible by the support of The George Gund Foundation.

AICP|CM credits will be provided for this event, sponsored by APA Cleveland

Thursday, October 6, 2016

5:30pm – 7:00pm

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

RSVP HERE

09-13-16

INDEX Studio: Cleveland x Havana Report

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Kent State University’s College of Architecture + Environmental Design offers an annual research studio dedicated to international design exchanges. The 15-week studio is based at KSU’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC). In 2016, the INDEX Studio examined relationships between Cleveland, Ohio and Havana, Cuba. By comparing these very different urban contexts, the studio provided new insights into familiar places and a better understanding of the challenges facing global cities.

Read and download the full report, written in English and Spanish, below.

Twelve graduate students generated proposals for a waterfront site in each of the two cities. The Cleveland site is the now-defunct Lakeshore Coal Plant, a monumental structure on a 60 acre site along the city’s eastern lakefront. The Havana counterpart is the Nico-Lopez Oil Refinery, a 500 acre facility still functioning as a refinery on the southeastern banks of Havana Bay.

Ash Pond ParkGraduate students Alexander Scott and Jordan Fitzgerald re-envisioned the Lakeshore Coal Plant as a regional destination for industrial arts preservation and production, located in close proximity to Cleveland’s University Circle arts and culture district.

Proposed Havana Bay Waterfront DevelopmentGraduate student Morgan Gundlach examined the opportunities to incorporate the 5′ (1.50 m) sea-level rise expected by 2100 by creating a dynamic ribbon of green spaces along Havana Bay’s waterfront.  

Students met with a range of design professionals and local experts while in Havana. These insights and direct observations gathered during the five day travel formed the basis of urban design proposals shown in the report. At the conclusion of the studio, students received feedback on their proposals from Cuban architects Ernesto Jimenez and Sofia Marquez Aguiar during the architects’ visit to Cleveland. The students’ design work will be exhibited in Havana, at the Fabrica de Arte Cubano, in Spring 2017.

The INDEX Studio is part of the curriculum for the Master of Architecture and Master of Urban Design programs in Kent State’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED). Kent State is committed to global education and expanding the cultural literacy of our students. Cuba offers a remarkably complex and locally relevant range of design opportunities. This initial studio is a first step toward establishing relationships with colleagues and collaborators in Cuba.

View and download the full report below:

Support for the travelling studio was generously provided by The Cleveland Foundation.

09-08-16

Students Study Housing Alternatives for Cleveland

This summer’s graduate studio at the CUDC focused on issues of housing in the city of Cleveland. Eleven graduate students in architecture and urban design selected sites across the city to develop a strategy for housing various ages, incomes, and forms of collective living. Titled “Home Economics: The State of Housing in Cleveland,” the studio used interdisciplinary methods for making site determinations and strategies—combining urban planning, community development, and design thinking to aspects of their project. Students studied the recent Vacant Property survey released by the CUDC with Thriving Communities Institute and other studies to suggest alternative forms of development in neighborhoods across the city. Strategies ranged from urban systems questions relating to lead contamination in housing, to dispersed housing strategies that attempt to introduce affordability as a stabilizing factor both in gentrifying neighborhoods and in under-invested neighborhoods.

The studio marks the culmination for Master’s of Architecture students at the CUDC, while students in the Urban Design program will continue into capstone research.

Below are examples of some of the student’s work featured in the report.

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images for blog post-2Student Caitlyn Scoville’s project examined methods for remediation, demolition, and development in neighborhoods with high lead concentrations.

images for blog post-3Student Lizz Weiss’ “Aff the Grid” project introduces new models of affordable housing and collective living.  

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images for blog post-6Student Elizabeth Ellis’ project provides housing options for immigrant populations that allow inhabitants to determine the degree of assimilation they wish to undertake in the community.