05-31-17

WATERMARK: Summer 2017

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Did you know that Giddings Brook runs underneath the Hough neighborhood? About 100 years ago, the brook was buried in a pipe so that houses, streets, businesses, schools, and churches could be built on top.

This summer, there will be events and programs to help remember Giddings Brook. Councilman TJ Dow is supporting an effort by Cleveland Neighborhood Progress, Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, and artist Mimi Kato to mark the path of this invisible brook the following events. All will be held at the intersection of Giddings Road and Superior Avenue (right across the street from the Addison Library).

Mon, June 12, 2017
1-3 PM
WATER, PLANTS & WILDLIFE WORKSHOP This free workshop is open to all, especially neighborhood kids who are home on summer break. We’ll learn about rainwater and where it goes after it falls on streets, sidewalks, and rooftops in the neighborhood. We’ll also learn about native plants and invasive species. Participants will receive seed packets they can plant. We’ll also make and install animal sculptures to remember the wildlife that used to live along Giddings Brook. Free refreshments for all!

Thurs, July 20, 2017
1-3 PM

TEMPORARY WATER PARK AT WATERMARK 100 years ago, people could swim in Giddings Brook when the weather got warm. Now that the brook is hidden underground, we’ll try to recreate the experience of water with sprinklers, wading pools, and a sandy beach on the site. Come cool off with Watermark!

Sat, Aug 26, 2017
noon-4 PM

WATERMARK WALK & COMMUNITY COOKOUT A free event where residents can learn about Giddings Brook and enjoy lunch. This event may also include a rain barrel workshop with the City’s Office of Sustainability.

For more information: https://www.watermark-giddings.org/

Or call Jeff Kruth at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, 216-357-3433

05-22-17

Bygone Landscapes of Cleveland and New Orleans: the conduit of the everyday

MH headshotMaggie Hansen, Director, Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design, Tulane University

This spring our Masters of Landscape Architecture students engaged in a studio with Maggie Hansen of Tulane UniversityMaggie worked with students at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative on a 5-week vertical studio titled “Bygone Landscapes of Cleveland and New Orleans: the conduit of the everyday”. This was a continuation of the Master of Landscape Architecture Traveling Workshop that took place in New Orleans over spring break.

This collaborative studio kicked off with the KSU students visiting New Orleans. Over 3 days, they visited sites designed to support both hydrological function and community gathering. In addition to site visits, they discussed design and policy approaches to urban hydrology with designers, policymakers, and planners, including Aron Chang of Blue House, Colleen McHugh of the City of New Orleans Office of Resilience, and Austin Allen and Diane Jones of Design Jones. The exchange between Tulane’s Small Center for Collaborative Design and the Kent State Landscape program revealed many shared challenges for Cleveland and New Orleans.

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The studio has been developed in conversation with the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District’s Project Clean Lake Program. In 2011, NEORD entered into a consent decree to address water quality issues in Lake Erie by capturing 98% of CSO – the highest level of capture nationally. This capture is primarily achieved through the construction of 7 deep storage tunnels, ranging from two to five miles long, up to 24 feet in diameter and located up to 300 feet underground – the tunnels hold water in a rain event and release it for treatment. As NEORSD has constructed these tunnels, they’ve acquired a series of parcels where tunnel access and construction staging has occurred. These sites will continue to be used for maintenance of the tunnels and the District recognizes the opportunity for the sites to serve as neighborhood amenities following construction. The studio is looking at the potential of these parcels to engage the layers of hydrology and neighborhood fabric more fully, in hopes to expand the range of possibilities for NEORD as the work continues. The students began the studio with visits to 3 sites in the Dugway watershed, and a tour of ‘restored’ sites with NEORSD, to see the sites under construction and some of the completed ‘parklets’ following construction. From these observations and an analysis of the site layers, the students developed ‘deep section’ models of the sites, as a means of understanding the complex, layered systems impacting each site, and as a starting point for design.

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The studio will deliver a booklet of conceptual ideas to the District following the 5-week studio. We will publish the booklet on our Issuu site when completed.