09-20-18

RE-CITY: Call for Applications

 

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Innovative Training Network | Reviving shrinking cities – innovative paths and perspectives towards liveability for shrinking cities in Europe (RE-CITY) is recruiting 13 Marie Skłodowska-Curie PhD positions for Early Stage Researchers (ESR). The RE-CITY consortium consists of scholars and practitioners from nine beneficiary-institutions in eight countries (Germany, United Kingdom, France, Luxemburg, Netherlands, Portugal, Poland, and Mexico). All have an interdisciplinary background working on shrinking cities. Additionally seven partner-institutions and companies from four countries, including Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative are assisting with training in Germany, Netherlands, USA and Japan.

The PhDs will be hosted at one of the beneficiary-institutions of RE-CITY: Technische Universität Kaiserslautern (TUK), Cambridge Architectural Research (CAR), École Normale Supérieure Paris (ENS), Spatial Foresight (SPF), TU Dortmund University (TUDO), University of Amsterdam (UVA), University of Porto (UPORTO), Adam Mickiewicz University Poznan (AMU) and University of Guadalajara (UDG).

The RE-CITY ITN is funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 programme to explore and evaluate new approaches and success factors for shrinking cities. The project aims to train highly skilled experts for the four key themes of shrinking cities: conceptualizing shrinking smart, governing, greening/right-sizing, and regrowing shrinking cities. RE-CITY provides a perspective for the robust and sustainable development of shrinking cities, while supporting elements of economic prosperity, liveability, social stability and innovation. This Innovative Training Network will develop novel solutions for shrinking cities, and investigate case study approaches for dealing with them in terms of the four key themes noted above. On this basis, the RE-CITY programme will develop a framework of tools and methods, including planning instruments. The RE-CITY ITN enables the ESRs to act as leaders, mediators, and consultants of change while fostering innovative solutions and perspectives for these areas.

 Through co-supervision by academics and non-academic partners, the PhDs of RE-CITY will undertake critical, practical, and creative exploration of the contribution and relationships between their individual doctoral study projects across the four interconnecting research themes.

In addition to undertaking doctoral research, the PhDs will engage in collaborative research, workshops, and training  to develop advanced skills and expertise in tackling social, economic and ecological challenges linked to demographic and structural change.

Please note this is a general call for the whole RE-CITY ITN. More specific requirements for individual selection criteria and information on financial support and remuneration will be available at the shortlisted stage.

The full call document is available here, including more detailed information about the individual PhD projects.

Applications should be sent preferably via e-mail as one single PDF file to re-city@ru.uni-kl.de by 12 noon (MET), 15 October 2018.

For inquiries, please write to re-city@ru.uni-kl.de.

09-20-18

2018 Fall Lecture Series at the CUDC

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We have a great line up of speakers and programs at the CUDC this fall. All programs are free and open to the public.

Please join us this Friday, September 21 at noon for a talk by Megan Lykins Reich from the Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland entitled Intentions are not Results. Megan will explore the space between our original vision or intent for a project and how it actually materialized in the real world.

09-20-18

Design Diversity Index

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The CUDC and our project partner, Jacinda Walker, recently completed a Design Diversity Index for Ohio. This project was made possible with the generous support of The George Gund Foundation.

The Design Diversity Index project began with a question: How can the design community know which actions are working best to increase diversity in our fields? We collected demographic data about the people currently in design schools and the design professions so that strategies for increasing diversity can be evaluated based on their results.

The resulting Design Diversity Index is a tool for gauging the numbers and percentages of people of color in architecture, landscape architecture, graphic design, industrial design, interior design, and urban planning in Ohio’s universities and professional organizations. The Index focuses on representation of African American and Latinx communities. Using available data, the Index establishes current baseline conditions and will track annual progress toward expanding racial diversity in the design professions.

The project found that representation by people of color in the design professions in Ohio is low. For example, African Americans are the second largest ethnic group in Ohio (12.2%), but have the lowest representation in architecture among the state’s five major ethnic groups (African American, Hispanic, Asian, White, and Other). According to the American Community Survey, only 1.29% (76 people) of Ohio’s architects are African American. If we hope to make the design professions more open and inclusive, we can first begin by understanding the design journey–the paths that people take from first discovering an interest in design, to pursuing a design education, and ultimately finding work in a design field.

Mapping the design journey (Jacinda Walker, www.designexplorr.com/research)

Mapping the design journey (Jacinda Walker, www.designexplorr.com)

The Design Diversity Index is an important step toward understanding barriers to diversity in the design professions today, and tracking progress toward greater design diversity in the future.

For more information and to download the Design Diversity Index report. please visit DESIGN DIVERSITY

09-18-18

CUDC Friday Lecture Series: Intention is not Results

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Please join us at noon on Friday, September 21 for a lecture by Megan Lykins Reich entitled, Intention is not Results. Megan is Deputy Director for the Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland (MOCA) where she helps set a vision for the Museum’s innovative artistic and educational programs and supervises strategic initiatives. She has also curated some remarkable and mind-expanding exhibitions at the museum, including There Goes the Neighborhood; DIRGE: Reflections on [Life and] Death; and Duke Riley: An Invitation to Lubberland. Megan will talk about the gap between what we envision or intend at the beginning of a project and how it actually materializes in real life. 

This lecture is free and open to the public. Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative is located at 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200. Please ring the intercom by the front entrance to be buzzed in.