03-06-19

Making Our Own Space

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Now in its fifth year, Making Our Own Space (MOOS) is a CUDC program in which teenagers design and build public space improvements that make their neighborhoods more comfortable, functional, and appealing. MOOS began in Cleveland’s Buckeye neighborhood with the support of the Saint Luke’s Foundation and has since expanded to other neighborhoods around the city.

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Last fall, the CUDC partnered with the Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization to bring MOOS to the neighborhood for the first time. For one week, students worked in Dudley Triangle, a pocket park at the intersection of Dudley Avenue and 73rd Street. This location is particularly significant to us, since the conversion of this vacant lot into a public park was a recommendation included in the 2013 neighborhood plan that the CUDC prepared for the south end of Detroit Shoreway. It’s exciting to see our partners implement ideas for public spaces generated during a community planning process, and especially rewarding when we get to contribute to the activation of one of those spaces through MOOS.

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For this workshop, the youth focused their work on improving the pedestrian experience on the nearby Lorain Avenue commercial corridor. Working in groups, they developed two concepts—one for a long bench dubbed the Lorain Lounger and another for a larger sheltered seat with an iconic framework design surrounding it. Despite a week of almost constant rain, the crew rallied to quickly develop their ideas and realize final iterations of their designs. We were excited to incorporate some lighting features into the finished products, and share some of our work with the DSCDO community at their recent annual meeting.

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MOOS students also designed one of the winning entries in the Sit & See CLE competition, sponsored by Destination Cleveland and LAND studio. Sit & See CLE will create a collection of places where Clevelanders and visitors can sit (or stand) and take in views along Cleveland’s trail system and possibly get a new perspective. The MOOS team is building a three-dimensional viewing platforms along the recently opened section of the Cleveland Lakefront Bikeway, between West 28th Street and West Boulevard. The students built a prototype on-site in February and will work with a professional fabricator to build a permanent structure on the site this spring. 

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Visit wearemoos.org or email CUDC urban designer Katie Slusher to learn more about the exciting things going on with MOOS.

03-06-19

Historic American Landscape Survey for Liberty Row

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Please join us for a lecture by Landscape Architect Jeff Knopp on Friday, March 8 at noon at Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, 1309 Euclid Avenue, 2nd Floor.

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Jeff Knopp PLA, ALSA, CID is Principal and President of Behnke Landscape Architecture in Cleveland.

He will  will discuss his experience in participating in the Historic American Landscape Survey (HALS) challenge co-sponsored by the National Park Service and American Society of Landscape Architects. In particular, he will discuss his 2018 submission documenting the history of Liberty Row.

This event is free and open to the public. You are welcome to bring your lunch. Light refreshments will also be served.

03-05-19

Student Teams Create Development Plans for Cincinnati Riverfront

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This January, three teams of graduate students from the Kent State CAED and Cleveland State competed in the Urban Land Institute Hines Student Competition. Running two weeks, the competition asks students to analyze an existing site in a North American city and develop a 10-year urban design & financing plan for the area. The competition is an opportunity for students in design & development to work together and understand how cities are developed in real-life scenarios.

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This year’s site was in Cincinnati, along the Ohio River but disconnected from the CBD by a major highway, Fort Washington Way. The students were charged with creating a cohesive mixed-use district that successfully wove this area back into larger urban and regional systems.

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Team “Syn City” harnessed urban agriculture & autonomous transportation to develop a scheme to grow and provide food for Cincinnati’s local urban neighborhoods in the heart of the city.

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Team “Over the Vine” extended Vine Street into a riverfront pier to make a strong connection with the Ohio River and through the CBD into the growing neighborhood of Over the Rhine.

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Team “Cincinnati Greenway” emphasized pedestrian-scale green connections throughout the development area, encouraging wandering and discovery.

The Cleveland chapter of ULI generously supports the student competition each year. Professionals from the local design & development community volunteer their time to assist on evening reviews & critiques. We’re grateful to all our professional partners for their support.

Congratulations to all our students for their hard work!