04-04-19

Zero Threshold Design Competition

ZT

ZeroThreshold is an international architectural design competition that elevates ideas of housing accessibility through beautiful design.

Winning entries will receive monetary awards and be featured in an exhibition and publication. The strongest and most innovative awards may be constructed in a future second phase of the competition. The submission deadline in June 28, 2019.

Meet the jurors…

Gyungju_Chyon_bw
GYUNGIU CHYON is an assistant professor of Product and Industrial Design at Parsons.

download
ANDREW FRONTINI is a Principal at Perkins+Will and the Design Director of the Toronto and Ottawa studios.

sheena_mcgee

SHEENA MCGEE, Allied ASID, is the principal and owner of Sheena McGee Designs in Cleveland, Ohio.

justin_bw
JUSTIN GARRETT MOORE is an urban designer and the executive director of the New York City Public Design Commission.

Ogbu_Liz_SH2018_0_bw
LIZ OGBU is a designer, urbanist, and spatial justice advocate. She is an expert on social and spatial innovation in challenged urban environments globally.

04-04-19

Dialoguing Toledo

Print

Please join us at noon on April 12 for a lecture by Elizabeth Ellis entitled Dialoguing Toledo. The lecture will be held at the CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue on the second floor. Elizabeth will discuss the quest to capitalize on grassroots organizational capacity and community engagement within the city of Toledo.

Toledo has a population and infrastructural bandwidth that is not quite large enough to be considered one of Ohio’s big cities. Within the city, there is the feeling that it is left out or somehow cheated by Capitol Hill. But the root of the problem can likely be traced to a lack of transparency and the need to control outputs that stem from local organizations.

While topics such the algal bloom, or most recently the Lake Erie Bill of Rights, make national headlines, there is still no clear line of sight to which organizations manage the underlying environmental issues that Toledo has faced since its birth. Almost equally as important to environmental issues is how the city draws lines in physical plans for expansion and continued stabilization in the near future. The City of Toledo is fighting the clock as the latest city-wide plan, completed in 2011, will be obsolete after 2020. With the City of Toledo Plan Commission staff at a deficit, there is a need for an organization to help take on long range planning and implementation efforts.

color 2
One consistent factor in promoting change within Toledo has been grassroots organizations. It was a local group of concerned community members who took on implementing the Lake Erie Bill of Rights, and it will eventually be a team of multiple local organizations who take on the Toledo “Future City Plan.” So how Toledo better leverages these organizations to get the work done ultimately becomes the quest. Sustainable partnerships of grassroots internal linkages and linkages to major Toledo institutions becomes pivotal in ensuring capacity. There is an immense opportunity for expansion of expertise as the gap that excludes them seems to grow. Toledo has looked outside city limits to capture talent that already exists within its grassroots efforts, so at what point does all of the hard work pay off?

IMG_6855

Elizabeth’s talk is part of our alumni series in which graduates from Kent State’s Cleveland-based design programs talk about their work. This event is free and open to the public. You’re welcome to bring a brown bag lunch and refreshments will be served.

04-01-19

Happy 150th, CPL!

 

south_1

In December of 2018 Cleveland’s South Branch, a historic Carnegie library in the Tremont neighborhood, reopened to the public. The hundreds of community stakeholders who reentered their local library for the first time in years discovered a renovated hybrid space where historic woodwork & Tudor-style windows coexist with recording studios, multimedia meeting spaces, and room for teens. Youth were already experimenting with the interactive VR equipment, while older residents were sitting near the fireplace in comfortable chairs reading the newspaper. The crowd was incredibly diverse, spanning multiple neighborhoods, ages, languages, and organizations.

In the ensuing months, the branch has already become a community hub, demonstrating the ways libraries are changing to meet new social & technological needs. South Branch embodies a new vision for a neighborhood branch library, and is at the forefront of a wave of changes for all our urban branches.

Since 2014, the CUDC has been collaborating with the Cleveland Public Library on a community visioning process for their branch libraries, including South Branch. Through the process, we’ve spoken with hundreds of Clevelanders about how they use and interact with their local neighborhood libraries, and how they’d like their libraries to evolve. Ironically, many voiced their fears that in the 21st century our libraries may become obsolete – even as they themselves continue to revolutionize the way we use our branches.

In reality, in an era of overwhelming access to information, Cleveland’s public libraries are more important than ever. Far from simply being repositories for books, today’s libraries provide technology training, social services, safe space for youth, and community work spaces. They attract hugely diverse user groups, and could be made even more relevant to a wider range of people—truly becoming community hubs for the public.

2019 is CPL’s 150th Anniversary, with a whole host of events & celebrations planned throughout the year. As an anniversary gift to our favorite library system and its incredible staff, here are some findings we’d like to share. Read more…