04-08-14

Terry Schwarz on Panel Discussion for HUD Quarterly Meeting

CUDC Director, Terry Schwarz, will be part of a panel discussion at the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) in Washington, DC, Thursdays, April 10th.

This quarterly meeting will examine Vacant and Abandoned Properties: Turning Liabilities Into Assets. Building on the current issue of Evidence Matters this update will consider vacancy from various perspectives and examine the work that communities are doing to limit or reverse its negative effects. The panel will discuss land banks that assemble parcels of land and maintain vacant properties until the land can be returned to productive use. In addition short-term uses such as stores, parks, and art projects that bring vibrancy to otherwise blighted spaces will be discussed.

If you are in the DC area and would like to attend please register here. The event will also be webcast live, more information available here.

Thursday, April 10, 2014
2:00 - 4:00 PM
Brooke-Mondale Auditorium
HUD Headquarters

Evidence Matters Winter 2013Photo credits from left to right: Cuyahoga County Land Reuitilization; McAllen Public Library; GTECH Strategies

02-04-14

Lunch Lecture | Friday, February 7, 2014

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This Friday, February 7th, CUDC Urban Designer, Jeff Kruth will present his research surrounding vacant land and shrinking cities, entitled The Political Agency of Geography and the Shrinking City as part of the ongoing lunch lecture series.

In the talk, Jeff will explore alternative forms of organization and neighborhood development in shrinking cities where typical market-based solutions are inadequate for providing a social and economic vitality.

The lunch lecture series will take place from 12-1 PM and is free and open to the public.

Lunch Lecture
February 7, 2014
12-1 PM
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115


12-13-13

Neither a Duck, Nor an Island

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Last weekend the CUDC was all-hands-on-deck for a three-day neighborhood planning charrette in the micro-neighborhood of Duck Island, a small neighborhood nestled between Ohio City and Tremont. The near-west side of Cleveland has recently attracted a lot of development interest, and subsequently there has been lots of speculation around Duck Island, which we see as a potentially transit-oriented and walkable neighborhood whose under-the-radar identity is a refreshingly appealing asset. This autumn Tremont West Development Corporation, in conjunction with Cleveland Neighborhood Progress, issued a planning RFP to pull speculative development into a cohesive plan for the neighborhood that takes into account existing residents’ needs and concerns.

The CUDC facilitated a kickoff community meeting and work session last Thursday, using a series of brainstorming and engagement tools to draw out issues and opportunities from Duck Island residents and stakeholders. Residents engaged in break-out groups around four distinct areas of design potential: open space; neighborhood infill; streetscapes; and neighborhood identity.

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Ultimately, our team pulled together a working plan based on two primary organizational structures: the main corridor of Abbey Ave, which we envisioned as a small-scale mixed-use street at the heart of the neighborhood; and a series of open space and landscape strategies linked in a ring around the neighborhood, along its existing sloping topography. Additional recommendations around housing infill, connectivity, and safety and maintenance were also included for review by participants.

Currently we’re pulling the recommendations into a draft, which Tremont West will then distribute before Christmas in order to give residents and stakeholders some time to review and evaluate the work. A final community meeting will be scheduled for mid-to-late January, to provide final feedback.

If you’re a resident or stakeholder of Duck Island and you didn’t get a chance to participate in the charrette process last week, feel free to contact Kristen Zeiber (kzeiber @ kent.edu) and we’ll make sure your voice is heard!

-Kristen Zeiber, Project Manager

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12-10-13

Mount Pleasant Neighborhood Plan Focused on Arts, Culture & Entertainment

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Cleveland’s Mount Pleasant neighborhood is making headlines with their efforts to provide civic, local, and regional amenities. The CUDC is wrapping up a Transportation for Livable Communities Initiative (TLCI) plan focused around the Kinsman Rd. and Union Ave. intersections. Development focused on arts, culture, and entertainment could augment the strengths of the civic improvements, outlined in this recent article on Cleveland.com.

Akron based design and planning firm, Environmental Design Group (EDG) recently completed a civic vision and TLCI plan, just to the west of the study area of the CUDC’s work. Combined, these two plans provide a framework for development in the coming years, as well as point to specific projects which can provide neighborhood amenities.

The CUDC’s plan in the neighborhood calls for enhanced bicycle infrastructure, new development at the point of E. 140th St., Union Ave., and Kinsman Rd., traffic enhancements, public art, and green space.  A proposed roundabout at the point would create a more efficient traffic flow, safety for pedestrians, and an identifying feature in the neighborhood.  Working with the Mount Pleasant NOW Development Corporation, the planning process will be wrapped up by the end of the year.

Birds eye view of roundabout.

09-09-13

Join us Friday, Sept. 13th, for a Lunch Lecture with author Gordon Young

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Gordon Young is the author of Tear-down: Memoir of a Vanishing City. He will be visiting the CUDC as part of our Fall Lecture Series, Friday, September 13, from 12-1pm.

“At the height of the real estate bubble, Gordon Young and his girlfriend buy a tiny house in their dream city, San Francisco. They’re part of a larger influx of creative types moving to urban centers, drawn by the promise of fulfilling jobs, bars that offer a dizzying selection of artisanal bourbons, and the satisfaction that comes from thinking you’re in a place where important things are happening. But even as Young finds a home in a city sometimes described as 49 square miles surrounded on all sides by reality, a vital part of him still resides in industrial America in the town where he was raised: Flint, Michigan. It’s the birthplace of General Motors, “star” of the Michael Moore documentary Roger & Me, and a place that supplies the national media with never-ending fodder for “worst-of” lists.”

Gordon Young’s insights, hard-hitting and often painfully funny, yield lessons for cities all over the world. He reminds us that communities are ultimately defined by people, not politics or economics.Teardown reveals that the residents of Flint are still fighting, in spite of overwhelming odds, to reinvent their city.

Gordon Young grew up in Flint, Michigan, the birthplace of General Motors, where his accomplishments included learning to parallel park the family’s massive Buick Electra 225. After reaching an uneasy truce with the nuns in the local Catholic school system, he went on to study journalism at the University of Missouri and English literature at the University of Nottingham. His work has appeared in The New York Times, Slate, Utne Reader, and numerous other publications. Since 2007, he has published Flint Expatriates, a blog for the long-lost residents of the Vehicle City. He is a senior lecturer in the Communication Department at Santa Clara University and lives in San Francisco.

Gordon Young, Tear-down: Memoir of a Vanishing City
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200, Cleveland, OH 44115
September 13, 2013
12-1pm

05-06-11

BioCellar Event Videos

If you missed the BioCellar event at the CUDC on April 26th, now you can watch the presentations online:

BioCellar Presentations - 1 of 3 - Intro


BioCellar Presentations - 2 of 3 - Darrell Frey | Bioshelter Market Garden @ Three Sisters Farm


BioCellar Presentations - 3 of 3 - Gauri Torgalkar | BioCellar: Concept to Prototype


05-03-11

RFP for Urban Agriculture Innovation Zone

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Re-imagining a [Greater] Cleveland is seeking proposals to develop a plan for the Kingsbury Run Urban Agriculture Innovation Zone.

The Urban Agriculture Innovation Zone is a defined district (in the area of East 79th Street and Kinsman Avenue in Cleveland, Ohio) that will foster entrepreneurial farming activities and related businesses. The plan will provide a comprehensive design approach for a Live | Play | Grow neighborhood that integrates agriculture into the surrounding neighborhood.

Download the RFP

04-07-11

BioCellar Event 4/26 @ CUDC

Click here to download BioCellar invite pdf


05-12-10

Detroit Disassembled at Akron Art Museum

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From Akron Art Museum website:

Andrew Moore’s photographs of the Motor City are sublime—beautiful, operatic in scale and drama, tragic yet offering a glimmer of hope. They are the subject of Detroit Disassembled, an exhibition organized by the Akron Art Museum making its debut here before touring nationally. Detroit, once the epitome of our nation’s industrial wealth and might, has been in decline for almost a half-century. The city is now one-third empty land—more abandoned property than any American city except post-Katrina New Orleans.

Detroit Disassembled: Photographs by Andrew Moore
June 5, 2010 -  October 10, 2010
Arnstein, Bidwell and Isroff Galleries
Akron Art Museum
One South High Akron, OH 44308
(330) 376-9185

Detroit Disassembled exhibit website

Andrew Moore artist website

by david jurca

03-22-10

Manchester DJ Dave Haslam Talk

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This is a short notice event announcement, but we’d like to invite everyone to stop by the CUDC for an exciting presentation on Saturday, March 27th starting at 5:30pm. A friend of ours, the multi-talented Dave Haslam, will be visiting from Manchester, UK next weekend for a DJ-ing gig at B-Side Liquor Lounge on Sunday and we want to take the opportunity to spotlight some of his other interests with a talk the night before.

Dave will deliver a talk on the post-punk band Joy Division’s emergence in the context of post-industrial Manchester in the late 70’s, the band’s re-emergence as New Order after singer Ian Curtis’ tragic death and their music’s enduring influence to this day.

If you’re a fan of Joy Divison, New Order or the bands they inspired (U2, the Killers, Arcade Fire, etc.), then this is definitely an event you won’t want to miss. But the story of creativity in the midst of affliction is something in which we can all find inspiration.

download poster pdf

by david jurca

12-20-09

Public Square Concepts Go Public

Public Square : exiting Tower City

Thread scheme : Exiting Terminal Tower / Field Operations

This past week, a steering committee comprised of members from Downtown Cleveland Alliance (DCA) and ParkWorks reviewed initial concepts for a redesign of Cleveland’s Public Square. Our CUDC office was on the design team, which was lead by James Corner’s Field Operations (FO). Our joint team was selected by the steering committee through an RFQ process back in October. The short time frame between team selection in October and initial concepts due on December 16th meant that we all had to work quickly to gather information on existing conditions, review studies already undertaken on future uses of Public Square and prepare images of alternative schemes for the steering committee to weigh in on.

The CUDC supported FO’s lead design work by assembling data and mapping of current conditions and providing “on-the-ground” information to FO regarding cultural and social context. In the process, we also created a time-lapse video of Public Square, which provides a clear visual of the constant shade condition on the southwest quadrant, closest to the Tower City entrance. Collaborating on a project with an office located in another city was a valuable experience and we’re very excited about the concepts developed.

Read more…

10-19-09

Resilient Cities Lecture

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The Cleveland Museum of Natural History’s Explorer Lecture Series will bring Dr. Timothy Beatley, professor of urban and environmental planning, for a lecture on Green Urbanism: The Global Shift Towards Sustainable and Resilient Cities. Dr. Beatley of the Department of Urban and Environmental Planning, School of Architecture at the University of Virginia has authored several books including Green Urbanism: Learning from European Cities and Resilient Cities: Responding to Peak Oil and Climate Change.

In Resilient Cities, Beatley presents four scenarios for the future of cities: Collapse, Ruralized, Divided or Resilient Cities. The first describes the nightmare scenario of writers such as James Howard Kunstler, which warn that skyrocketing oil prices and climate change will initiate a chain of events resulting in significant loss to human life, global economic failure and an end to civilization as we know it. Beatley doesn’t believe that Collapse is inevitable, but does warn against other, slightly less apocalyptic scenarios. Read more…

10-16-09

House, Turned Inside Out Opening


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House, turned inside out
3601 Siam Road, Cleveland

Opening October 27, 2009
4-9pm

Closing December 11, 2009


Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative/Pop Up City hosts Martin Papcun (Prague, Czech Republic) as he presents his newest large-scale, site-specific installation at 3601 Siam Road in Ohio City.

The artist, along with construction partners American Tank Fabricating and Affordable Demolition & Hauling Inc., will slice into the walls of a house and turn them inside out to reveal the interior of the home. The installation, House, turned inside out, a massive, yet intricate deconstruction, will be open to the public for one month.


The project is funded by a grant from CEC ArtsLink New York. For more information, email: info@popupcity.com

09-10-09

VOTE: Bridge Design[Build] Charrette

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What if the Detroit-Superior Bridge lower level became a public space? How would you use it? Now is your chance to see it happen.

1. Visit www.BridgeProjectVote.com to share your thoughts on initial concepts developed by students involved in the Bridge Project design[build] charrette. Leave your comments on the projects and begin a dialogue with the students. What ideas do you like? What would you like to see more details on? What new uses would you like to see included?

2. Share the link with co-workers, friends, family and smarter-than-average pets.  The students would love to have your feedback so they can quickly develop and refine their projects. Only a few projects will be selected to be built full-scale on the bridge, so make your thoughts known!

3. Come to the public opening during the Bridge Project on Friday and Saturday September 25th (4pm-midnight) and 26th (noon-midnight) to experience the selected projects as built prototypes. Public input on the projects will continue during the two day bridge opening as people activate the spaces and students observe the interactions, then adjust the installations.

Oftentimes as designers the distance between conceptual plan and embodied user experience is too wide to be meaningful. The rapid prototyping concept for the Bridge Project charrette intends to collapse this distance and introduce user feedback earlier in the design process. The installations during the event should not be viewed as finished products, but rather as prototypes designed to engage and draw feedback from the future users of the space.

Many thanks to Jeff Schuler for constructing the drupal website for project voting: www.jeffschuler.net

by david jurca

09-09-09

All You Can Eat: A Buffet of Architectural Ideas for Cleveland

Kent architecture alums Tedd Ferringer, Jeremy Smith and Michael Abrahamson are hosting the event, “All You Can Eat: A Buffet of Architectural Ideas for Cleveland.”

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Here’s their write-up of the event, which will be happening in University Circle on Oct. 30-31:

What is a city’s recommended daily intake of architecture? Let’s exceed it…

All You Can Eat: A Buffet of Architectural Ideas for Cleveland, an upcoming exhibition to be held at The Sculpture Center, posits that the city has a high metabolic rate, burning through ideas faster than they can be ingested. In response, the exhibit will present a binge of possible futures excessive in scale and exhaustive in scope, ideas both raw and cooked, half-baked and hair-brained.

Join us in preparing a feast.

For more information on this event, including how to submit an entry (you don’t need to be an architect/designer, although you certainly can be), click here.