10-28-11

EcoVillage Charrette Recap

Thanks to all those that participated in this year’s community design charrette, which took place in Cleveland’s EcoVillage neighborhood this past week (Oct 22-26, 2011). The CUDC staff and students worked closely with neighborhood residents and stakeholders, including Councilman Matt Zone and staff from Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization, to assess community priorities, then develop design proposals that range from long-term visions to immediately implementable actions (see the presentation from the second Public Meeting below).

We were also fortunate to have eight students from Ball State University’s Master of Urban Design program work along side us for the busy weekend, led by their instructor Bruce Race. The Ball State students brought diverse backgrounds in landscape architecture, planning, as well as architecture, to the charrette, which served the collaborative process very well. Our Kent State students enjoyed the interaction with fellow urban design majors, so we hope to return the favor with a visit to Indianapolis sometime in the near future. The interdisciplinary approach to a community charrette is an area of interest we’re keen on exploring further.

Incorporating feedback from the second public meeting, the CUDC will create a charrette report, documenting the design process and clearly communicating the proposals developed over the intense three day work session. We’ll make the final report available to the public and neighborhood residents once it’s complete. Based on what we heard from community members and local leaders, there’s a strong sense of optimism around the feasibility of the recommendations and an excitement to get started. Check out a recap of the charrette from the perspective of an EcoVillage resident on The Thrifty Bon Vivant blog.

EcoVillage Charrette – Fall 2011

10-27-11

OSU’s Karen Lewis Lecture @ CUDC

blog_karen-lewis_switchspaceJoin us Friday, October 28th at 12 noon as we welcome Ohio State University Assistant Professor Karen Lewis for a talk on her winning entries for the Van Alen Institute’s Life at the Speed of Rail design competition.

Karen Lewis Talk
Friday, October 28, 2011
12 – 1 PM
CUDC Conference Room
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, PlayhouseSquare

Along with two student team members, Karen was selected as a competition winner for their entry Switch Space, which questioned the logic of linear corridors within the geography and development patterns of the Midwestern expanse. Her winning entry can be viewed on the Van Alen’s website here. Karen’s submission Health Corridor was also selected as an Honorable Mention. This Ohio centered proposal aligns a statewide high-speed rail corridor not with city centers, but rather along prominent health institutions.

Karen Lewis is an Assistant Professor of Architecture at The Ohio State University whose design research examines the intersection of graphic and infrastructural systems. Recent projects include Stock Exchange, an analysis, exhibition and proposal for the Bluegrass Stockyard, the largest stockyard East of the Mississippi River; Yellowtown, an examination of the relationship between signage, urban development and race; and Start / Gap, which visualizes human trafficking patterns and proposes ways to interrupt this exchange. Most recently, Professor Lewis was awarded the ACSA New Faculty Teaching Award, a prestigious award given to new faculty during their formative academic years who demonstrate excellence in teaching.

10-27-11

Hipp Deck featured on Next American City

We’re very excited that Next American City, a non-profit dedicated to promoting socially and environmentally sustainable economic growth in America’s cities, recently featured the CUDC’s Hipp Deck project on their Americancity.org website. In addition to the popular website, Next American City also publishes a quarterly magazine focused on emerging practices dealing with urban change and innovation.

The Hipp Deck was a temporary use intervention that transformed the upper level of the 740 Euclid Ave. parking garage in downtown Cleveland into an outdoor live performance venue and active rooftop public space. The event was a celebration for the release of Cleveland Stories: True Until Proven Otherwise, the fourth volume in the CUDC’s Urban Infill journal series. The parking garage is located on the site formerly home to the Hippdrome Theater, a nationally renowned 4,000 seat performance venue. The “Hipp”, as it was commonly known, was demolished in 1981, so the Hipp Deck told the story of the site’s illustrious past by bringing back live music performance for one spectacular night.

We’re encouraged to think the Hipp Deck’s intent of spurring dialogue and action around the temporary activation of parking infrastructure in Cleveland will spread to other cities and enable others to reactivate their favorite underused spaces.

You can see photographs of the Hipp Deck event, taken by local Clevelander Matthew Fehrmann, on our Flickr site. Check ‘em out and stay tuned for more info on upcoming Pop Up City projects!

For more information on the Hipp Deck or Cleveland Stories project, please visit the CUDC’s website. The event was supported by the George Gund Foundation and Cuyahoga Arts & Culture, in partnership with Historic Gateway Neighborhood Corporation, SPIRE Institute, Filtrexx, Opera Cleveland, Ohio City Bike Co-op, Cleveland Bikes and Ampco System Parking.

10-18-11

Cleveland EcoVillage Design Charrette

Members of the public are invited to attend a design charrette, a.k.a. community workshop, to envision the Cleveland EcoVillage‘s future development and urban design plans. Several projects have been recently completed or are currently underway in this vibrant community, so the charrette comes at a good time to envision linkages between these investments and plan for new opportunities.

The charrette will take place over the course of several days, beginning with a public meeting on Saturday, October 22nd at 10am and culminating in a public presentation on Wednesday night, October 26th at 7pm. The design charrette will be conducted by the CUDC staff and KSU graduate students, in partnership with Detroit-Shoreway Community Development Organization and Ward 15 Councilman Matt Zone.

Public Meeting 1
Saturday, October 22
10am – noon
Metro Catholic School
1910 W. 54th St.

Public Meeting 2
Wednesday, October 26
7pm – 8:30pm
Metro Catholic School
1910 W. 54th St.

The Cleveland EcoVillage is located in the Detroit-Shoreway neighborhood and is defined by W. 52nd St. on the east, W. 65th St. on the west, I-90 on the south and Franklin Blvd. on the north. The boundaries of the EcoVillage are based on a 15 minute walking radius around the W. 65th St. RTA rapid station.

Please consider attending both public meetings to provide your input and review the proposals that will be developed quickly between Saturday and Wednesday by the design team. The community charrette is an important opportunity for design professional, students and local residents to create a shared neighborhood vision for the future.

Click here for the Facebook event page.

Download the charrette flyer here.

For more information, please contact the CUDC at 216.357.3434 or cudc@kent.edu

10-13-11

Cover the City with Lines & ride the dambl II

Saturday, October 15, 2011
12 – 3 PM, rain or shine
Click here for Facebook event page

Join artist Paul Druecke in honoring the legacy of counter-culture icon d. a. levy. Ride the dambl (d. a. levy memorial bike lane) and/or come to the levy Midpoint Memorial where we will create an ephemeral shrine to d. a. levy. Take part in a story that links the culture wars of the 1960′s to current battles for progressive infrastructure spending and bike-friendly cities.

d. a. levy (1942 - 1968)

12 PM | Ride the dambl II
There are two starting locations for those that want to ride the dambl: West End of Abbey Avenue Bridge (West side Cleveland) and South End of Wade Lagoon @ University Circle (East side Cleveland). Riders will depart from the starting locations at 12 PM and converge at the Midpoint Memorial around 1 PM, stop for refreshments, and can either continue on to the second half of the dambl or join us onsite for the duration of the festivities. Ride coordinators will be located at both starting points: Emilio DeSabato (West side) and Kevin Cronin (East side).

12 PM | Midpoint Memorial
If you prefer not to ride, you can go directly to the Midpoint Memorial location at noon, where the dambl riders will join at 1 PM. The Midpoint Memorial location is 1933 Euclid Avenue, between E. 18th and E. 21st, north side of the street. We will occupy a small park on the grounds of CSU in honor of d. a. levy. We will play recordings of levy, and friends, reading his work. There will be levy artifacts and perhaps an impromptu presentation while covering the sidewalk with lines from levy’s poems. Ingrid Swanberg and Tom Kryss created a contemporary reading of Cleveland Undercovers for this event! Swanberg and Kryss were levy’s friends and have been key proponents of his legacy.

7:30 – 9:30 PM | Post Ride @ Becky’s
1762 East 18th Street, Cleveland, OH 44114
Join us for a drink in honor of levy and the dambl.

See map below for event locations:

View Cover the City with Lines and dambl ride in a larger map

Overview:
Paul Druecke’s project, Cover the City With Lines, was developed in conjunction with the CUDC’s Cleveland Stories: True Until Proven Otherwise. The project’s title comes from the levy poem, Cleveland Undercovers. d. a. levy (1942-1968) was a poet, visual artist, and publisher at the frontline of the 1960′s struggle for freedom of expression. He was twice arrested by local authorities while exercising rights we now take for granted. Since his tragic, premature death in 1968, supporters have called for Cleveland to honor/memorialize him. Cover the City with Lines picks up the story by proposing an extensive urban bike lane named for levy, the d. a. levy Memorial Bike Lane a.k.a. the dambl. The dambl connects Cleveland’s east and west sides while linking 60′s era culture wars to today’s battle for alternative transportation and bike-friendly cities.

Participants from first dambl ride at CIA gallery exhibit.

Participants from first dambl ride at CIA gallery exhibit.

Download pdf description of Cover the City with Lines project

For more information, contact the CUDC at (216) 357-3434 or cudc@kent.edu

10-03-11

Rumi Shammin Presents The Oberlin Project


Rumi Shammin, PhD, Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies at Oberlin College, will discuss The Oberlin Project, a planned green redesign of the Oberlin community at the CUDC on Friday, October 7th from 12pm – 1pm. The Oberlin Project is a collaborative effort between the college and the City of Oberlin to create “full-spectrum sustainability” in which the parts are integrated to reinforce the resilience and durability of the whole community.

Rumi Shammin Lecture
Friday, October 7, 2011
12pm – 1pm
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
(map)
Cleveland (Playhouse Square)
Free and open to the public

The vision of the project joins the many strands of sustainability – urban revitalization, green development, advanced energy technology, sustainable agriculture, green jobs, and education – into an integrated response to the burgeoning crisis of climate destabilization, environmental deterioration, and economic turmoil.

At the heart of the Oberlin Project is the revitalization of a 13-acre block near the city center that will include the development or renovation of a dozen buildings during the next five to seven years. The investment in construction, renovation, and energy technology is intended to stimulate the expansion of existing businesses and create new enterprises.

The Oberlin Project will also join the Climate Positive Development Program, a joint initiative of the Clinton Climate Initiative, a program of the William J. Clinton Foundation, and the U.S. Green Building Council. Launched in May 2009 by President Clinton, the Climate Positive Development Program supports the development of large-scale urban projects that demonstrate that cities can grow in ways that are climate positive—able to reduce the amount of on-site CO2 emissions to below zero.