02-04-14

Lunch Lecture | Friday, February 7, 2014

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This Friday, February 7th, CUDC Urban Designer, Jeff Kruth will present his research surrounding vacant land and shrinking cities, entitled The Political Agency of Geography and the Shrinking City as part of the ongoing lunch lecture series.

In the talk, Jeff will explore alternative forms of organization and neighborhood development in shrinking cities where typical market-based solutions are inadequate for providing a social and economic vitality.

The lunch lecture series will take place from 12-1 PM and is free and open to the public.

Lunch Lecture
February 7, 2014
12-1 PM
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115


05-12-10

Detroit Disassembled at Akron Art Museum

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From Akron Art Museum website:

Andrew Moore’s photographs of the Motor City are sublime—beautiful, operatic in scale and drama, tragic yet offering a glimmer of hope. They are the subject of Detroit Disassembled, an exhibition organized by the Akron Art Museum making its debut here before touring nationally. Detroit, once the epitome of our nation’s industrial wealth and might, has been in decline for almost a half-century. The city is now one-third empty land—more abandoned property than any American city except post-Katrina New Orleans.

Detroit Disassembled: Photographs by Andrew Moore
June 5, 2010 -  October 10, 2010
Arnstein, Bidwell and Isroff Galleries
Akron Art Museum
One South High Akron, OH 44308
(330) 376-9185

Detroit Disassembled exhibit website

Andrew Moore artist website

by david jurca

06-15-09

The Bridge Project Charrette

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For more info on the Bridge Project event, please visit:  www.clevelandbridgeproject.com

Every year, graduate students at the CUDC take part in a community design charrette, which addresses the urban design needs of a particular site or neighborhood in Northeast Ohio. This year’s charrette will be part of the Bridge Project scheduled for September 25th and 26th.

During a typical charrette, students are asked to gather relevant data about the focus area in preparation for a community meeting where stakeholders and residents share their thoughts and desires for the neighborhood. The students then work along side CUDC staff to quickly develop design solutions and assemble presentations for the community. In years past, the student charrettes have focused on downtown Lakewood, the Jewish Community Federation site, the Howard Street corridor in Akron and Youngstown’s Oak Hill neighborhood.

Read more…

05-21-09

Map of Cleveland’s Green Systems

This is a map of Cleveland showing vacant sites (in red), existing parks (in dark green), and proposed parkland and greenspaces (in light green).  The map was drawn by the Urban Design Center for Cleveland LandLab.

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posted by marianne eppig.

05-20-09

Pop Up City Book Trailer

It might not have the quick edits and intense action sequences of typical movie trailers, but we think our star moved pretty fast, for a panda.

Urban-Infill Volume 2: Pop Up City can be ordered from Amazon or from the Shrinking Cities Institute website.

Support for the Pop Up City initiative is provided by the Civic Innovation Lab and the Sears-Swetland Foundation. The publication of the Pop Up City book was made possible by funding from the George Gund Foundation and the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

by david jurca

05-13-09

Terry Schwarz Receives Cleveland Arts Prize

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Congratulations to our very own Terry Schwarz for being awarded the 2009 Cleveland Arts Prize! Terry is senior planner at the CUDC and an adjunct professor at Kent State University.

Terry was awarded the artist prize in design for her work surrounding the Shrinking Cities Institute at the CUDC, which addresses local population decline. The multifaceted work of the Shrinking Cities Institute includes the Cleveland Land Lab, the Pop Up City! temporary use intiative and two editions of the Urban-Infill Journal

The awards ceremony will be held Thursday, June 25th at the Hanna Theatre in Playhouse Square. Tickets are available by calling 216 321-0012 or by email at info@clevelandartsprize.org.

by david jurca

05-08-09

CircletheUSA.com visits Cleveland

CircletheUSA.com, a website maintained by the Planning Commissioners Journal, is currently undertaking a cross-country road trip documenting notable city planning projects along the way. The recently concluded first leg of the trip stretched from Vermont to Cleveland and the second leg will continue on to Chicago. reimagining-cover

While in Cleveland, the blog’s author met with Terry Schwarz, Senior Planner from the CUDC, Bob Brown, Planning Director for the City of Cleveland and Bobbi Reichtell, Senior Vice President for Programs at Neighborhood Progress Inc., to discuss the Re-Imagining a More Sustainable Cleveland report. The visit and subsequent thoughts on Cleveland’s progressive strategy for addressing vacancy are presented in the Audacious…or Realistic? post. 

Read more…

05-05-09

A Piping Hot Slice from Designerosa

Designerosa! from david jurca on Vimeo.

Thank you to everyone that came out to Designerosa! All of us at the CUDC had a great time and we’re really glad to have met so many new people.  We especially want to thank Heelsplitter, the amazing bluegrass band that travels to all their shows by bike, Greg Priddy, Indy and Greg Peckham for the miniature ponies (Cinnamon and Doodle), and Lois Moss from Walk + Roll Cleveland for bringing everyone together for Transportainment.   

We’d also like to thank Kelly from KRA photography for taking the brilliant photographs shown below.  You can see the entire Designerosa photo set and order prints at her client lounge, just type in “walkroll” as the password. 

The new Pop Up City book we released at the event should be available on Amazon soon, but in the meantime, please visit our Shrinking Cities Institute website to order a copy.  

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kra_designerosa-doorway

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Read more…

04-24-09

Artists vs. Blight

037-bridgemix-10-10-08Art installation at Bridge Mix, photo by Stephen Piscura

The CUDC’s Pop Up City initiative, Arts Collinwood and other Cleveland arts organizations were highlighted in a recent Wall Street Journal article about artist communities developing in blighted neighborhoods.  Although there’s nothing new about artists moving into low-rent areas, the recent foreclosure crisis is motivating communities to increase incentives for artists: 

Drawn by available spaces and cheap rents, artists are filling in some of the neighborhoods being emptied by foreclosures. City officials and community groups seeking ways to stop the rash of vacancies are offering them incentives to move in, from low rents and mortgages to creative control over renovation projects.

Some of the local organizations mentioned in the article include:

Arts Collinwood :: Collinwood

78th St. Studios :: Detroit Shoreway

ArtMart 09 :: Ohio City

DanceWorks @ CPT :: Detroit Shoreway

Pop Up City

Building Bridges

ArtSpace Cleveland

Also check out this set of Collinwood photos from the Plain Dealer.

by david jurca

04-23-09

Shrinking Flint

hacked-houseCleveland hacked-house rendering by Gauri Torgalkar, CUDC

The New York Times recently posted an article on how Flint, Michigan is planning to deal with its city’s depopulation and vacancy by demolishing entire neighborhoods. The idea is that speeding up the process of decline in certain sections of the city will consolidate any housing demand that remains into a few viable areas.

Housing demolition as a reaction to vacancy is occurring in Cleveland as well.  The City is currently planning to remove 2,000 homes this year. Not only will most of the embodied energy of these structures be lost in a landfill, but the fabric of the neighborhoods will also be forever changed.  Can the abandoned structures still be used as urban greenhouses or biocellars? What sort of neighborhoods are we creating if we add 2,000 new voids a year?  Could these new acres of land be put to productive use? 

by david jurca

04-18-09

Green City Blue Lake on Pop Up City

Last week Marc Lefkowitz, blog author extraordinaire for Green City Blue Lake, published a great post about Pop Up City and the Urban Design Center’s efforts to ignite (not literally) vacant spaces in Cleveland.

To read the post, visit http://www.gcbl.org/blog/marc-lefkowitz/counterculture-ignites-fallow-urban-space

In addition to giving our new publication, Pop Up City, a congenial review (“The essay and book is not only a fascinating read, it’s filled with eye candy”), Marc brought up some good points.  He asked towards the end of the post:

Will those seeds grow to inspire some Temporary Users to leave the protective circle of the CUDC?

In other words, he’s asking whether the Cleveland Urban Design Center’s Pop Up temporary events will inspire other groups and individuals around the city to start temporary uses of their own in otherwise abandoned lots.

For anyone out there who is reading this, we would love to hear back from you.  Leave a comment and let us know about your experiences, ideas, and events that were/are all about temporary uses of vacant spaces.

And for anyone who is interested in starting a temporary event or use of a vacant space in Cleveland, there is a handy brochure in the back of the recent Pop Up City publication titled “Temporary Use Advice & Contacts”.  It lets you know what kinds of permits you might need to get in order to use a space, and it’s also chock-full of advice from how to get sponsors to how many Port-O-Potties you may need.  So, if you haven’t already, pick up a book and start igniting (please, not literally) Cleveland!

by marianne eppig.

10-09-08

LOVE YOUR PLACE

I just moved back to Cleveland, my hometown, after graduating from college in New Hampshire, and one thing kept me from moving off to New York, Boston, or Chicago to join so many of my peers: the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative.

Although I loved growing up under the shade of the giant oak trees in Shaker Heights—where I walked the block to and from lower and middle school—I convinced myself while I was away in New Hampshire that the only place to live and work after graduation was some other city… any other city.

Why was this? Many of us Clevelanders have come to terms with the fact that Cleveland is indeed a shrinking city. Young people need jobs, and they want to be around other young people. I was lucky enough to find work in Cleveland, but many of my peers have not been so lucky.

So Cleveland needs to work on Sustainability. Sustaining the younger generations so that we have a growing (and constantly improving) workforce. Sustaining the economy with jobs – jobs that could be created through up and coming Green enterprises (plug for the wind turbines on the lake, among many other ideas to make Cleveland the Green City on the Blue Lake). Sustaining the environment by redeveloping in our city instead of continually sprawling.

While rooting for Cleveland is a lot like rooting for the Browns, many of us will never give up hope. There are so many people in this town that are dreaming, striving, and toiling to make Cleveland the Great City that it is and will become. The Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative is chock-full of people like this. They’re constantly concocting new and exciting ideas and then turning them into realities.

The CUDC is a Community of Practice. Their work has transformed many areas of Cleveland and its surrounding suburbs through redesign and redevelopment. The people at the Urban Design Center inspired me to re-imagine the way I thought about Cleveland and what I hoped for its future.

The CUDC taught me to once again “Love My Place” and to work towards making it the Perfect City for both myself and for many others.

by marianne eppig.