09-27-17

Greggor Mattson Lecture | September 29

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Lecture: “Who Needs Gay Bars? Why Planners Should Care And What You Can Do”
Greggor Mattson
Friday, September 22nd
12(noon) — 1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

RSVPs encouraged on Facebook event page: www.facebook.com/events/118361948853908/

The high profile closures of gay bars over the last five years have brought to public attention what the gay press has worried about for years: the geographical focus of LGBTQ life is changing. Popular and scholarly attention have blamed our “untethered,” “ambient,” “post-Gay” landscape on two factors: geolocating smartphone apps such as Grindr or Tindr, and the growing social acceptance of LGBTQ people. This talk challenges these assumptions for all but the most metropolitan gay cities. Almost everything we know about LGBTQ placemaking in the U.S. comes from four major cities with iconic gay neighborhoods, global financial institutions, international tourist draws—and only 15% of the U.S. population.

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This talk examines the gay bar as an institution in its own right, focusing on the role it plays in secondary cities such as Cleveland, Fresno, or Oklahoma City, and outpost bars that are the only gay bar within an hour’s drive of another. In these small cities, often in red counties of red states, smartphone apps are of little use and social acceptance is more elusive. Data include 50 interviews with gay bar owners and managers, site visits to over 80 gay bars in 27 states, a new national dataset of gay bar listings from 1977-2017, and a longitudinal study of San Francisco’s three gay bar districts. Mattson shows that bars in general have been squeezed in recent years, and that gentrification, changing leisure patterns, and corporate chain competition are more relevant to the challenges facing gay bars than narratives of technological or social progress. Mattson reports on several ways that urban planners, municipalities, Chambers of Commerce, and Convention Bureaus could support gay bars, and argue why they should start doing so. And he argues that we need to abandon planning stereotypes of LGBTQ people as the shock troops of gentrification or canaries of the knowledge economy, and start treating regional gay bars as social institutions in their own right.

Greggor Mattson is Associate Professor of Sociology at Oberlin College and the Director of the Program in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies. With degrees in sociology from Oxford University and the University of California, Berkeley, his research lies at the intersections of the sociology of sexuality, culture, and urban studies. The author of The Cultural Politics of European Prostitution Reform: Governing Loose Women and Before It Was Hingetown, listed among the best writing from and about Northeast Ohio from 2016 by the Cleveland Scene. He is currently working on a book about changes in American gay bars over the last twenty years. He blogs at greggormattson.com and @GreggorMattson on Twitter.

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09-22-17

Publication Release: NEW LIFE FOR OLD HOMES

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We’re happy to announce the publication of New Life for Old Homes: Design Guide for the Low-Cost Rehab of Vacant & Affordable Housing!

New Life for Old Homes is a user-friendly guidebook of low-cost, high-impact ideas for the rehabilitation of vacant and abandoned houses that would otherwise be demolished. The project was conceived in tandem with our Design/REbuild initiative, a vacant brick home in the St Clair-Superior neighborhood that was rehabbed by students from KSU’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design (and lots of community volunteers). While Design/REbuild could only address one house at a time, New Life for Old Homes captures the larger design ideas around refreshing Cleveland’s vacant houses to make them vibrant again.

Cleveland’s historic neighborhood fabric is threatened by the 1,000+ demolitions that take place every year. These houses form the basis of our traditional city neighborhoods and, while they may not have dramatic architectural or historic significance, they contribute to the familiar scale and character of Ohio’s cities. The goal of New Life for Old Homes is to repair, rather than demolish, and to rediscover the unique appeal that older houses have to offer. We hope the guide inspires Clevelanders to look again at our sturdy homes that are too good to throw away.

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New Life for Old Homes was generously sponsored by the Ohio History Fund, which supports innovative historic preservation projects across the state. We’re deeply grateful for the support of the OHF in creating this publication.

Please feel free to browse the publication below, and if you’d like to purchase a print-on-demand copy for yourself, you can find our Amazon link here. We also have copies of the printed book available for free at CUDC. If you’d like to pick up a copy, just stop by the CUDC office between 9am – 5pm and ask for the New Life for Old Homes book.

 

09-20-17

Ben Herring Lecture | September 22

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Lecture: “Source Material: Identities in Architecture”
Ben Herring
Friday, September 22nd
12(noon) – 1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

RSVP on the Facebook event page.

Join us at the CUDC this Friday, September 22nd for a talk by Ben Herring, project manager at redhouse studio architecture. His interactive presentation will explore meaning through materiality in architecture. The applications of architectures are no longer simple, nor simply for providing shelter. The uses of architecture include identities as concrete as defining the face of business (Facebook Headquarters, Gehry Partners), as personal as defining home (Incremental Housing Complex Quinta Monroy, Elemental), and as controversial as redefining our memory (Vietnam Memorial, Maya Lin). These projects are young. However, architecture is prehistoric. In turn, many well established views on the state of the art of architecture have been declared and deconstructed throughout architectural history.

The aim of this presentation will be to review an abbreviated collection of these influences on architectural history. This survey of trademark architectural definitions, agendas, and identities will then be used to provide a groundwork for discourse on how we approach architecture today.

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Clifford Benjamin Herring is a designer specializing in new materials and architectures for public good. Ben was administered various honors at Ball State University where he received degrees in Architecture and Economics. He has previously served as a board member for PBS and NPR member stations in Southern Indiana and is currently seated as the executive board treasurer for the Refresh Collective (the organization responsible for the Fresh Camp). Ben is a project manager at redhouse studio architecture where his work includes new material developments and various non-for-profit and commercial architectures. As a workshop director for the CUDC’s Making Our Own Space (MOOS) program, Ben works with youth throughout Cleveland, Ohio to influence their neighborhoods through design and construction.

Let us know you’re coming. RSVP on the Facebook event page and please spread the word!

View the CUDC’s full 2017 Fall Lecture Series.

 

09-11-17

Jacinda Walker Lecture | September 15

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Lecture: “Design Journeys: Strategies for Increasing Diversity in Design Disciplines”
Jacinda Walker
Friday, September 15th
12(noon)-1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

Join us at the CUDC this Friday at lunch for a talk by Jacinda Walker, the second event in our 2017 Fall Lecture Series. Jacinda Walker will discuss the objectives of her research work, “Design Journeys: Strategies for Increasing Diversity in Design Disciplines.” This solutions-based thesis presents fifteen strategic ideas to expose African-American and Latino youth to design-related careers. The interactive talk will reveal her research approach, illustrate the problems, share the design principles needed to close the diversity gap, and include the first groundbreaking updates on the Design Diversity Index project. Attendees will leave with a clear definition of this complex problem and a deeper appreciation of what is required from educators, parents, organizations, and designers of all disciplines to diversify our profession.

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The Design Journey Map, created by Jacinda Walker, is a tool to guide progress towards increasing diversity in the design fields.

Jacinda Walker is the founder of designExplorr, an organization that celebrates design learning by creating opportunities that expose African American and Latino youth to design. She also serves as Chair of AIGA’s Diversity & Inclusion Task Force. Walker has over 20 years of industry experience as a designer, entrepreneur, and instructor. Jacinda earned her BFA in graphic design from the University of Akron and an MFA in Design Research & Development with a minor in Nonprofit Studies from The Ohio State University. Her future goals include working with organizations to establish design education initiatives and to develop design programs for underrepresented youth.

For more information about the upcoming talk, please contact the CUDC at (216) 357-3434 or cudc[at]kent.edu

 

09-08-17

Watermark Project Summer Finale

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The CUDC, with partners Neighborhood Progress, artist Mimi Kato, and archaeologist Dr. Roy Larik, recently held their summer finale of events surrounding the Watermark project. The project seeks to evoke the memory of the Giddings Brook, a waterway buried and culverted in the early 20th century. Dee Jay Doc and Fresh Camp provided hip-hop entertainment, improvising lyrics about the history of the Giddings Brook, problems concerning lead in their neighborhoods, and other stories. Food, a rain barrel give-away, and an installation of the Watermark beach and pool also brought people out to the site.

 

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Giddings Brook is one of several waterways buried as the city developed in the early 20th century. The Brook holds history as a recreation, entertainment, and restorative place of gathering. Luna Park, a theme park, a Fresh Air Camp, and multiple healthcare facilities were located along the path of Giddings Brook before its ultimate burial. Watermark seeks to ask how else we might consider the use of existing waterways today, as well as those now buried in so many neighborhoods throughout the city.

 

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Watermark is made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

09-07-17

2017 CUDC Fall Lecture Series | Schedule

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We invite you to join us for our annual Fall Lecture Series at the CUDC. This semester’s theme for lectures and events is “ReMaking the City,” an iterative action that links the diverse range of speakers.

Most lectures are scheduled for Fridays from noon to 1pm and held in our CUDC conference room (1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200). All events are free and open to the public, but the Youth Maker Workshop and Habitat for Hard Places Boat Tour require reservations. Sign up for the CUDC mailing list to receive more information on how to register, when it becomes available.

We also plan to livestream our lunch talks on Facebook. Please follow Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative’s FB page to get updates on which events will be streamed online.

Check out the Fall Lecture Series schedule below or download an 11″ x 17″ poster (3.2 MB PDF). Feel free to hang the poster in your office or share via social media—we hope to have lots of new attendees this year!

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06-29-17

Post-Graduate Fellow wins Burning Man Grant

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Working study model for design approval.

The CUDC is happy to announce that our Post-Graduate Fellow Jonny Hanna has been awarded one of the highly prestigious Burning Man Global Arts Grants for his fellowship project “Forget Me Not.” The project is one of 20 such grants awarded to community-based art projects around the world. This year’s projects will take place in Tel Aviv, Bengaluru, Budapest, Kiev, and Cleveland to name a few!

The project was born out of the Cleveland Public Library’s 150th-anniversary planning process being undertaken by the CUDC. The project will culminate as an art installation and piece of permanent urban furniture in the plaza space of the Eastman Branch of the Cleveland Public Library. It will be comprised of a multi-rowed fabricated seating structure, and a framing apparatus for a 17’x14′ window which will look onto a newly programmed temporary performing arts and gallery space. The project will be complete by early August with an event to come. Please stay in touch via the blog or social media (@ksuCUDC) and we will post event details when finalized.

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Image above depicting initial collage submitted with letter of intent.

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Image submitted for the second round of jurying.

04-20-17

Hingetown Tour | April 28 | 12-1 PM

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For our last “lecture” of the Spring Series, we will be going on a tour of Hingetown to view and discuss the community projects happening in this neighborhood in Ohio City. Join us April 28, 2017, at 12 PM. The tour will begin at the corner of 29th & Detroit Ave. and will last about an hour. Our tour guides will be Marika Shioiri-Clark & Graham Veysey both residents and developers of this neighborhood. Stops on the tour will include the Striebinger block, the Print Shop buildings, few of the Creative Fusion murals, as well as, the new Spaces Gallery and the Transformer Station.

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Marika Shioiri-Clark and Graham Veysey spend their days in a 140-year-old firehouse in Hingetown – part of the Ohio City neighborhood. As neighborhood developers and designers, Marika and Graham converted the vacant Ohio City Firehouse into a vibrant mixed-used building with a coffee shop, florist, and collection of offices. Graham and Marika developed the block kitty-corner from the Firehouse into a vibrant retail and residential building just completed a third project called the Print Shop, and have been involved in planning numerous public events in the area. Called Hingetown, their work often focuses on connections and collaborations through the arts to promote public space and walkability across the near west side of Cleveland.

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Photo credit: Peter Larson

Hingtown Tour
April 28, 2017
12-1 PM
29th & Detroit Ave.
Cleveland, OH 44113

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01-30-17

Mabel O. Wilson | Feb 09

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On Thursday, February 9th, we welcome Mabel O. Wilson to our Spring Lecture Series. Mabel’s talk, “Building Racial States”, will address race and nation-state formation and its implication in current social movements.

Mabel O. Wilson is a Professor of Architecture at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation where she co-directs the Global Africa Lab and appointed as a Research Fellow at the Institute for Research in African-American Studies. She has authored Begin with the Past: Building the National Museum of African American History and Culture (2016) and Negro Building: African Americans in the World of Fairs and Museums (2012). Exhibitions of her work have been featured at the Art Institute of Chicago, Istanbul Design Biennale, Wexner Center for the Arts, and the Smithsonian’s Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum’s Triennial. She is a founding member of Who Builds Your Architecture?—an advocacy project to educate the architectural profession about the problems of globalization and labor.

Mabel will also be speaking at the College of Architecture & Environmental Design at the Cene Lecture Hall at 5:30 PM, in Kent, OH. Her evening lecture is titled, “Notes on the Virginia Statehouse: Slavery, Race, and Jefferson’s America”.

This event is free and open to the public. RSVP isn’t required, but it is requested. Please RSVP HERE.

Thursday, February 9, 2017
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

08-11-16

INPLACE Projects Funding Now Available

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INPLACE is a new arts initiative for Youngstown, funded by the  National Endowment for the Arts. It’s directed toward community-driven public art projects that combine storytelling with placemaking.

INPLACE is looking for artists, designers, and other creative people to develop projects around the themes of  Wayfinding, Parking, Lighting, Technology, and Green Infrastructure for the City of Youngstown. Grants of $20,000 will be awarded for five projects to be implemented in the city between November, 2016 and the end of July, 2017.

Projects proposals need to have a clear Youngstown focus, but you don’t need to be based in Youngstown to participate. To learn more about this exciting opportunity, please visit the INPLACE website and download the guidelines.

On September 6 from 5-7pm, there will be a community open house for people interested in applying for an INPLACE grant. All proposals need to be a team effort, with at least three team members. The open house will provide an opportunity to meet potential team members and learn about the rich cultural environment of Youngstown.

To participate, you’ll need to pre-register by August 19, by completing the pre-registration form on the INPLACE website.

The CUDC and Kent State’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design have deep ties to Youngstown and we’re honored to be advisors to INPLACE. We hope many artists and designers from Cleveland and elsewhere in Northeast Ohio will participate in this initiative.

06-27-16

5×5 : Participatory Provocations | Exhibition at CUDC July 11 – August 24

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5×5 : Participatory Provocations is an exhibit of 25 architectural models by 25 young American architects. 5 contemporary issues, each addressed by 5 firms. It will be exhibited at the CUDC from July 11 – August 24. There will be an opening reception at 5:30 PM on July 11th, along with a panel discussion with curators Kyle May, Julia Van Den Hout, and Kevin Erickson, as well as participants, Michael Abrahamson and Jonathon Kurtz.

Architecture as a profession struggles to simultaneously engage with the public and be provocative within the confines of its own field. Either arguments and proposals get “dumbed down” or they simply aren’t accessible or relevant. This exhibit argues for participatory criticism. Twenty-five young architects engage in a series of significant popular issues, taking clear stances and producing a physical expression or provocation as a means of communicating with a larger public. Each team responds to one of the five prompts — contemplating the future of drone deliveries, the consequence of the construction of extreme luxury highrises as financial investments, luxury tourism on the moon, the fictional development of NSA community branches, and the potential construction of an anti-immigration wall on the border between the United States and Mexico.

The avant-garde in architecture has for decades captured its imaginations via two-dimensional representations, but this exhibit asks architects to be just as provocative in three dimensions. Each team produces only a single model and short text on one of the prompts. The selected topics intend to provoke, but are grounded in issues we face today. Architecture has a seat at each discussion.

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5×5: Participatory Provocations is curated by Kyle May, Julia Van Den Hout, and Kevin Erickson. 

Kyle May, principal at KMA, which he founded in 2014. He also co-founded CLOG in 2011, where he is the Editor in Chief. He is a registered architect in New York and Ohio. He is a graduate of Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design, where he completed the Master of Architecture program at the CUDC.

Julia Van Den Hout is founder of Original Copy, and co-founder and Editor of CLOG. As Original Copy, she is currently producing TEN Arquitectos’s new monograph, as well as a book on expos and world’s fairs centered around the Milan Expo 2015. Prior to founding Original Copy, Julia was the Director of Press and Marketing at Steven Holl Architects for six years, where she was responsible for developing and coordinating the PR strategy for over 30 projects and competitions, organizing the opening and publication of 12 completed projects, and the coordination of multiple traveling exhibitions. She has a Master’s Degree in Design Criticism from the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

Kevin Erickson is a designer in New York City (KNE studio), and an Associate Professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Illinois. He is on the Program Leadership Council at the Van Alen Institute, was a Visiting Professor at the Mackintosh School of Architecture in Glasgow, and an Artist-in-Residence at the Geoffrey Bawa Lunuganga Trust in Sri Lanka.

5×5 : Participatory Provocations

Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
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309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

July 11 – August 24, 2016

The exhibition will be on view M-F 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM*
*7/18-22 please call 216.357.3434 for our availability, may be limited due to the RNC. 

Opening reception & panel discussion
July 11 at 5:30 PM

 

05-26-16

CHANGING VIEWS | Designing Youngstown’s Future

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The John J McDonough Museum of Art, Youngstown State University’s Center for Contemporary Art, will become a hub for exploring exciting possibilities for imagining public space in the city with you. Please join us at the Museum on June 10th for the opening reception from 6-8 PM. The exhibition will be on view through July 22nd.

CHANGING VIEWS | Designing Youngstown’s Future is a collaboration of regional universities with the citizens of Youngstown. Working with you, we are endeavoring to spark revitalization by demonstrating the potential for reuse and redesign in the area. The resulting projects will allow residents and businesses to see a future that otherwise might not be imagined. Youngstown State University’s Regional Economic Development Initiative (REDI) teamed up with students and faculty from Kent State University’s (KSU) College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) and KSU’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC). The exhibition highlights planning and design work that has taken place over the past year between economic development professionals at YSU and City of Youngstown residents along with the design expertise of KSU’s CAED and CUDC students.

CHANGING VIEWS | Designing Youngstown’s Future
June 10 – July 22, public reception, June 10, 6-8pm

John J McDonough Museum of Art
525 Wick Avenue
Youngstown, OH 44502

Hours
Tuesday – Saturday: 11 AM – 4 PM

The exhibition will also feature guest lectures from the CUDC staff.

Wednesday, June 29 | Economic Action Group Meeting | 10 – Noon
CUDC Guest Lecture 10 – 11am
Community Conversation: Ideas and Opportunities from the 2015 Youngstown Community Design Charrette
Kristen Zeiber, Urban Design and Project Manager, Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative

Thursday, July 7 | CUDC Guest Lecture 5:30 – 6:30pm
Historic Preservation and Urban Regeneration
Terry Schwarz, Director, Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative

Tuesday, July 19 | Economic Action Group Meeting | 10 – Noon
CUDC Guest Lecture 10 – 11am
Urban Design for Cold and Variable Climates
David Jurca, Associate Director, Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative

All lectures will take place in the McDonough Museum of Art Auditorium.

 

01-27-16

Call for Ideas: COLDSCAPES//Adapt

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Registration is now open!

COLDSCAPES//Adapt seeks submissions that respond to challenges posed by volatile weather conditions in winter cities.

 
Entrants should provide an effective visual (and potentially aural, if using video) presentation of a built project or conceptual proposal that responds to the following design concerns:

  • How can the built environment quickly respond to changing weather conditions?
  • What design strategies can enable more adaptable buildings, public spaces, and urban infrastructure?
  • How can cities embrace and express indeterminacy, while maintaining a high quality of life for its residents?
  • What insights from winter cities can be applied to the challenges of increased variability and volatility caused by global climate change?
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    red square2013 COLDSCAPES Competition winning entry Second Hinterlands, Noel Turgeon and Natalya Egon

    This year’s call for entries builds on the previous COLDSCAPES Competition, which brought significant attention to three winning projects and ten honorable mentions. Propelled by the competition, one of the winners, The Freezeway by Matt Gibbs, recently opened as a pilot project in Edmonton, Canada.

    edmonton freezewayPhoto of the built Edmonton Freezeway pilot project, a 2013 COLDSCAPES competition winner. (photo credit: Heather Dailey)

    Three winning entries will be selected by the jury to receive awards:

  • $500 First Place
  • $300 Second Place
  • $200 Third Place
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    Learn more and register for the competition at Coldscapes.org.

    The registration fee is $10 per team. Registration ends on February 12, 2016 and the submission deadline is Friday, February 19th at 6pm EST.

    2_fullpagePOLAR 77 by Wendy Wang and Ryan Ort, selected as one of three winning projects in the 2013 COLDSCAPES Competition 

    Competition winners will be announced at Brite Winter in Cleveland on February 20th. The announcement will take place following a public talk by COLDSCAPES//Adapt juror Sergio Lopez-Pineiro. The talk is free and open to the public, beginning at 3pm. Learn more about the event and RSVP here.

    The COLDSCAPES competition and public event are organized by Kent State University’s Center for Outdoor Living Design (COLD) in partnership with Brite Winter, with generous support from Ohio Arts Council.

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    12-21-15

    Point of View: Architecture + Migration

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    Associate Professor, Steve Rugare, will be speaking at Museum of Contemporary Art on January 7th, 2015. Departing from the work of Do Ho Suh, Steve’s talk will look at  how immigrant communities have adapted to the built environment in Cleveland and beyond.

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    Steve Rugare has been a full-time Associate Professor at Kent State University’s College of Architecture & Environmental Design (CAED) since 2009. In addition to teaching introductory courses in architectural history, he teaches urban history and theory at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) and the upper division courses in architectural history and theory. He has also coordinated the Master of Urban Design capstone project at the CUDC. Before 2009, Steve was a full-time member of the CUDC professional staff, managing competitions, coordinating events, and doing editing and graphic design. With Terry Schwarz, he edited the first two volumes of the CUDC’s Urban Infill journal. He has advised the Cleveland Design Competition since its inception.

    Steve Rugare’s primary research focus is modernism in the communicative and planning context of world’s expositions. This work–drawing on a wide interdisciplinary background in political theory, philosophy, art history, cultural studies, and intellectual history—has resulted in several articles and conference presentations, and a book is in the works.

    DATE:
    January 7, 2016
    7:00 PM

    LOCATION:
    Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland (MOCA)
    11400 Euclid Avenue
    Cleveland, OH 44106

    TICKETS:
    Free with museum admission

    10-22-15

    Students learn the design process at CMA/MOOS workshop

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    Last Wednesday we had the pleasure of working with high school students from the Museum Ambassadors Program at the Cleveland Museum of Art. We were asked to lead a workshop as part of the CUDC’s Making Our Own Space (MOOS) initiative. Created in January 2015, MOOS is an ongoing effort to engage Cleveland youth through hands-on design projects to empower and inspire the next generation of placemakers.

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    Museum Ambassadors is a twelve-year-old, multi-visit program, where high school juniors and seniors and their teachers gain experience in all aspects of museum life at the Cleveland Museum of Art and other University Circle institutions. Guided by museum staff and volunteers, museum ambassadors come to the museum for a full day once a month to participate in presentations, projects, and discussions relating to different departments in the museum. The program currently serves 80 students and teachers from Bedford, Hawken, John Hay, Lincoln-West, Shaker, Shaw, Strongsville, and Westlake high schools and the Cleveland School of the Arts.

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    We invited the group of over 30 students to participate in a fast-paced exercise to design a piece of furniture for the museum. Students were asked to imagine the user needs for different age groups, including themselves (teenagers), children, and the elderly. We led them through the whole design process from sketching and brainstorming, to design iteration and group presentations. After building a quick model in SketchUp on the computer, each team uploaded their design to an augmented reality app and viewed the model through iPads to see what their furniture would look like 3D in a real setting.

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    The final presentations produced some really creative ideas, crafted through multiple design tools and quick iterations. We hope that this intense, yet fun, workshop had the students thinking about a career in the design fields. To view more pictures click here.

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