11-06-19

The Architecture Play

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This Friday, November 8th from 5-7 pm, the next act of The Architecture Play is presented at the John Elliot Center for Architecture and Environmental Design, Kent State University, 132 South Lincoln Street in Kent, Ohio.

The Architecture Play is a collaborative multi-annual project by the A+D Architecture and Design Museum, Los Angeles and Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design.

Processed as either verb or noun, ‘play,’ despite its numerous instantiations, never obscures the most crucial aspect inherent to all of its forms and shades: a raw potential whose explorative drive pushes the states of being and knowledge, as well as the pre-existent boundaries of the physical and metaphysical environment, in a constant effort to derive value from play. Intimately entwined, play has thus accompanied scientific progress since before the Enlightenment.

The Architecture Play, a collaborative project conceived with these oscillating definitions in mind, similarly traces the ludic elements of the architectural discipline while projecting the potentialities of play beyond its preconceived limits. In four acts—a nod to its theatrical definition—the project constructs a complex ecology of actors and networks, of things and thoughts exchanged, transformed, and assembled to probe new avenues for pedagogy, practice, history, and theory of architecture; not simply transgressing boundaries but moving them altogether.

Organized by Ivan Bernal, Clemens Finkelstein & Anthony Morey, with participants Taraneh Meshkani, Katie Strand, Jon Yoder, Irene Chin, Gary Fox, Jia Gu, Lisa L. Hsieh, Kyle May, Antonio Petrov, and Leila Anna Wahba.

Produced with the support of Faith Chrostowski, Allison McClure, Benjamin Cyvas, Max Hentosh, Nick Ingagliato, Austin Keener, Vincent Noce.

10-17-19

Building Youth Power In Cities

 

Image credit: Cody Rouge & Warrendale Neighborhood Framework Investigators (HECTOR, Rodney Bridges, Marnesha Davenport, Khadijah Harris, Taylin Hodges, Skylah Pounds, Mouley Yusef Sabour, LaKendra Reynolds-Smith, Lillie Reynolds-Smith, Alexcia Stoner)

How are design & planning professionals collaborating with young people to build cities for the future?

Please join us for a special event celebrating five years of the CUDC’s Making Our Own Space program.

Tuesday, November 19, 2019 | 6:30 PM
Shaker Heights Public Library, 16500 Van Aken Boulevard

The event will include the release of a new guide to youth engagement and community design, inspired by the projects created by Cleveland area students through Making Our Own Space.

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It will also include a presentation by Jae Shin and Damon Rich entitled, Building Youth Power in Cities: Newark/Detroit/Cleveland at tha Crossroads. Jae and Damon are urban designers at HECTOR in Newark, New Jersey. They will discuss the triumphs and frustrations of inter-generational work to make change and build things in Newark, Philadelphia, and Detroit.

Free and open to the public. All ages are welcome. Refreshments will be served. REGISTER HERE

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This event is made possible through the generous support of The Saint Luke’s Foundation.

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Co-sponsored by APA Ohio. AICP Certification Maintenance credits (CM: 1.5 hours) available for certified planners.

Image credit: Cody Rouge & Warrendale Neighborhood Framework Investigators (HECTOR, Rodney Bridges, Marnesha Davenport, Khadijah Harris, Taylin Hodges, Skylah Pounds, Mouley Yusef Sabour, LaKendra Reynolds-Smith, Lillie Reynolds-Smith, Alexcia Stoner)

10-15-19

Stepping out, Stepping in

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Please join us for a lecture by Jennifer Birkeland on October 24 at 6 PM at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200, Cleveland. Ring the intercom at the Euclid Avenue entrance for access to the second floor.

Jennifer Birkeland is a founding partner at op – Architecture Landscape in Brooklyn New York; and an Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at Cornell University in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. She is a licensed landscape architect in the state of New York, a LEED accredited professional and a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome. Jennifer received her Master of Landscape Architecture at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design and has a Bachelor’s of Science in Landscape Architecture from California Polytechnic State University Pomona.

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Her practice approaches design problems by exploring the oppositions established by the vantage points of the two disciplines of focus, landscape architecture and architecture, developing design solutions that strive to disintegrate the subject-object relationship conventionally established between Landscape + Building. Prior to starting her own practice, Jennifer worked on a wide range of projects with the internationally renowned offices of West 8, OLIN, and Ken Smith Workshop.

CEU credits (1.5) are available to OCASLA members.

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, contact cudc@kent.edu or 216.357.3434.

10-15-19

River, Nahr, Río Exhibition Reception

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Join Kent State University’s College of Architecture & Environmental Design and the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative to celebrate the designers who participated in River, Nahr, Río, a collection of work by Kent State architecture students, which is currently on display in the Cleveland Foundation’s lobby.

The project was a partnership with the Cleveland Foundation’s Creative Fusion: Waterways to Waterways Edition.

When:
Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2019
5-7 p.m.

Where:
Cleveland Foundation Lobby
1422 Euclid Ave.
Suite 1300
Cleveland, OH 44115

RSVP HERE

10-15-19

Spaces of Conflict Conference & Exhibition

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October 25, 2019 | College of Architecture & Environmental Design, Kent State University

Our built environment has always been affected and transformed by conflict.

Consequently, design professionals are directly or indirectly influencing the processes of conflict through infrastructural development, urban and architectural interventions, planning policies, and public space making. By bringing together scholars, educators, researchers, and practitioners, we aim to debate, exchange ideas, and theoretical perspectives on the role of space in relation to different forms of conflict.

The Spaces of Conflict conference is organized as part of the 50th Commemoration of May 4, 1970 event at Kent State where the Ohio National Guard shot four of the KSU students and injured nine during the demonstration event against the US war in Vietnam and Cambodia. This event triggered many nationwide protests and demonstrations in other universities.

Friday, October 25, 2019 | Conference begins at 9:00 AM.

The day-long event is free and open to the public but REGISTRATION is required. 

  • Keynote Lecture: Felicity D. Scott at 5:30 pm
  • Exhibit Opening at 6:45 PM in the Armstrong Gallery.
  • Speakers: Silvia Danielak | Delia Duong Ba Wendel | Tali Hatuka | Samia Henni | Tahl Kaminer | Dina Khatib | Taraneh Meshkani Deen Sharp | Aleksandar Staničić | Hazem Ziada

PROGRAM DETAILS | REGISTRATION  | CONTACT

 

09-12-19

CUDC Fall Lectures & Programs

Please join us for the CUDC’s Fall Lecture Series. All events are free open to the public.

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September  18 | Noon | CUDC Gallery
Quilian Riano, Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative | Negotiating Bodies

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September 25 | Noon | CUDC Gallery
Dominic Mathew, Fund for Our Economic Future | No Car » No Job, No Job » No Car

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October 2 | Noon | CUDC Gallery
David Jurca, Seventh Hill LLC | Design to Transform

October 7 | 5:30 PM | Cene Lecture Hall
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Karen M’Closkey + Keith VanDerSys, peg landscape + architecture | Ground Control

 

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October 24 | 6PM | CUDC Gallery
Jennifer Birkeland, OP – Architecture Landscape | Stepping out, Stepping in

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October 31 | 9AM | Irishtown Bend Welcome Center, 1701 West 25th St.
Malaz Elgemiabby | OUTprint/INprint: What does dignity mean?

For more information, call 216.357.3434 or email cudc@kent.edu.

 

01-04-19

Squidsoup on the Detroit Superior Bridge

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The Cleveland Foundation has awarded a Creative Fusion grant to the CUDC to support a publicly accessible installation on the streetcar level of the Detroit Superior Bridge.

Since 2008, the Foundation has brought more than 90 accomplished or rapidly rising artists from around the world to Cleveland as part of an international arts residency program. In 2019, Creative Fusion artists will focus on the Cuyahoga River in Downtown Cleveland to celebrate the remarkable recovery of the river over the past 50 years. The Waterways to Waterways edition of Creative Fusion will bring together a group of six international and six local artists to focus on projects that connect the regenerative efforts for the Cuyahoga to global waterways. This two-pronged initiative will incorporate works that artists are doing in other parts of the world that inspire continuing progress in Cleveland and around the globe while providing lessons Cleveland can share with the rest of the world about how to revive and reimagine a river.

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In the 19th and 20th centuries, the Cuyahoga River was so polluted that it caught fire 13 times. The river last burned on 22 June 1969. The spectacle of the burning river spurred federal lawmakers to establish water quality standards for US cities. In the 50 years since the last fire, the Cuyahoga River has experienced a remarkable regeneration and is now a major scenic and recreational asset in the city.

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June 22, 2019 marks the 50th anniversary of the last time the river burned. The CUDC will join the City of Cleveland’s Office of Sustainability and many local organizations in Cuyahoga50, a celebration of the river’s recovery. We will work with Squidsoup, an arts collaborative based in the UK, to create a large-scale installation on the streetcar level of the Detroit-Superior Bridge.

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Squidsoup uses light, sound, computers, digital and physical artefacts to create dynamic immersive experiences. Their work is elemental by nature. Squidsoup has worked on water, in the air and on solid ground – in tunnels, unoccupied shopping malls, forests, parks and botanical gardens, lochs, public squares and art galleries. Their works respond to the wind, to the flow of people, data and water, with digital overlays conceived as liminal materials that inhabit the same spaces as we do, yet as boundary objects and elements, straddling the real and the imaginary. Squidsoup’s installation for the Detroit-Superior Bridge has not been finalized yet, but more details will be available this spring.

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As part of this project, the CUDC is also updating a 2012 Transportation for Livable Communities Initiative (TLCI) plan aimed at making the lower level of the bridge a year-round public space and bike/pedestrian connection. There will be opportunities for public input into this plan as the year unfolds.

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For more information, sign up for the CUDC’s newsletter or follow us on social media for updates.

10-04-18

David van der Leer at the CUDC

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David van der Leer, Executive Director of the Van Alen Institute, will give two lectures at Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative


Thursday, October 25 | Reception at 5:30pm featuring Kent State Ashtabula wines from Laurello Vineyards | Lecture at 6pm

David will talk about the work of the Van Alen Institute. Free and open to the public, but space is limited for this event. Please RSVP by October 11. RSVP LINK

Friday, October 26 | Lecture from noon-1pm | Brown bag lunch lecture — snacks will be provided

David will discuss how the Van Alen Institute selects and evaluates urban design projects. Free and open to the public, no RSVP is needed.

Both events will take place at the CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200. Please ring the intercom at the front entrance to be buzzed in.


Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design and the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative are pleased to welcome David van der Leer for a two day visit, October 25 & 26, 2018. As Executive Director of the Van Alen Institute, David develops projects that explore the nuanced relationship between the built environment and the human being. Under his leadership, Van Alen focuses on the ways our minds and bodies are impacted by the cities we live in, and how we in turn impact the environment.

A highlight is Ecologies of Addiction, a multi-year investigation into the ways digital technologies can shed light on the complex relationship between the city and addictive behaviors; it is currently in its first phase in London.

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Since arriving at the Institute in 2013, David has created a period of strategic growth with a new programming hub in the Flatiron district, and new models for connections between the Institute’s interdisciplinary design competitions, research, and public programs. In close collaboration with a vibrant new team and board, David is working to bring Van Alen’s work to places around the U.S. and beyond.

 

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Flatiron Public Plaza Holiday Design Competition

09-27-17

Greggor Mattson Lecture | September 29

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Lecture: “Who Needs Gay Bars? Why Planners Should Care And What You Can Do”
Greggor Mattson
Friday, September 22nd
12(noon) — 1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

RSVPs encouraged on Facebook event page: www.facebook.com/events/118361948853908/

The high profile closures of gay bars over the last five years have brought to public attention what the gay press has worried about for years: the geographical focus of LGBTQ life is changing. Popular and scholarly attention have blamed our “untethered,” “ambient,” “post-Gay” landscape on two factors: geolocating smartphone apps such as Grindr or Tindr, and the growing social acceptance of LGBTQ people. This talk challenges these assumptions for all but the most metropolitan gay cities. Almost everything we know about LGBTQ placemaking in the U.S. comes from four major cities with iconic gay neighborhoods, global financial institutions, international tourist draws—and only 15% of the U.S. population.

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This talk examines the gay bar as an institution in its own right, focusing on the role it plays in secondary cities such as Cleveland, Fresno, or Oklahoma City, and outpost bars that are the only gay bar within an hour’s drive of another. In these small cities, often in red counties of red states, smartphone apps are of little use and social acceptance is more elusive. Data include 50 interviews with gay bar owners and managers, site visits to over 80 gay bars in 27 states, a new national dataset of gay bar listings from 1977-2017, and a longitudinal study of San Francisco’s three gay bar districts. Mattson shows that bars in general have been squeezed in recent years, and that gentrification, changing leisure patterns, and corporate chain competition are more relevant to the challenges facing gay bars than narratives of technological or social progress. Mattson reports on several ways that urban planners, municipalities, Chambers of Commerce, and Convention Bureaus could support gay bars, and argue why they should start doing so. And he argues that we need to abandon planning stereotypes of LGBTQ people as the shock troops of gentrification or canaries of the knowledge economy, and start treating regional gay bars as social institutions in their own right.

Greggor Mattson is Associate Professor of Sociology at Oberlin College and the Director of the Program in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies. With degrees in sociology from Oxford University and the University of California, Berkeley, his research lies at the intersections of the sociology of sexuality, culture, and urban studies. The author of The Cultural Politics of European Prostitution Reform: Governing Loose Women and Before It Was Hingetown, listed among the best writing from and about Northeast Ohio from 2016 by the Cleveland Scene. He is currently working on a book about changes in American gay bars over the last twenty years. He blogs at greggormattson.com and @GreggorMattson on Twitter.

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09-22-17

Publication Release: NEW LIFE FOR OLD HOMES

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We’re happy to announce the publication of New Life for Old Homes: Design Guide for the Low-Cost Rehab of Vacant & Affordable Housing!

New Life for Old Homes is a user-friendly guidebook of low-cost, high-impact ideas for the rehabilitation of vacant and abandoned houses that would otherwise be demolished. The project was conceived in tandem with our Design/REbuild initiative, a vacant brick home in the St Clair-Superior neighborhood that was rehabbed by students from KSU’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design (and lots of community volunteers). While Design/REbuild could only address one house at a time, New Life for Old Homes captures the larger design ideas around refreshing Cleveland’s vacant houses to make them vibrant again.

Cleveland’s historic neighborhood fabric is threatened by the 1,000+ demolitions that take place every year. These houses form the basis of our traditional city neighborhoods and, while they may not have dramatic architectural or historic significance, they contribute to the familiar scale and character of Ohio’s cities. The goal of New Life for Old Homes is to repair, rather than demolish, and to rediscover the unique appeal that older houses have to offer. We hope the guide inspires Clevelanders to look again at our sturdy homes that are too good to throw away.

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New Life for Old Homes was generously sponsored by the Ohio History Fund, which supports innovative historic preservation projects across the state. We’re deeply grateful for the support of the OHF in creating this publication.

Please feel free to browse the publication below, and if you’d like to purchase a print-on-demand copy for yourself, you can find our Amazon link here. We also have copies of the printed book available for free at CUDC. If you’d like to pick up a copy, just stop by the CUDC office between 9am – 5pm and ask for the New Life for Old Homes book.

 

09-20-17

Ben Herring Lecture | September 22

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Lecture: “Source Material: Identities in Architecture”
Ben Herring
Friday, September 22nd
12(noon) – 1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

RSVP on the Facebook event page.

Join us at the CUDC this Friday, September 22nd for a talk by Ben Herring, project manager at redhouse studio architecture. His interactive presentation will explore meaning through materiality in architecture. The applications of architectures are no longer simple, nor simply for providing shelter. The uses of architecture include identities as concrete as defining the face of business (Facebook Headquarters, Gehry Partners), as personal as defining home (Incremental Housing Complex Quinta Monroy, Elemental), and as controversial as redefining our memory (Vietnam Memorial, Maya Lin). These projects are young. However, architecture is prehistoric. In turn, many well established views on the state of the art of architecture have been declared and deconstructed throughout architectural history.

The aim of this presentation will be to review an abbreviated collection of these influences on architectural history. This survey of trademark architectural definitions, agendas, and identities will then be used to provide a groundwork for discourse on how we approach architecture today.

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Clifford Benjamin Herring is a designer specializing in new materials and architectures for public good. Ben was administered various honors at Ball State University where he received degrees in Architecture and Economics. He has previously served as a board member for PBS and NPR member stations in Southern Indiana and is currently seated as the executive board treasurer for the Refresh Collective (the organization responsible for the Fresh Camp). Ben is a project manager at redhouse studio architecture where his work includes new material developments and various non-for-profit and commercial architectures. As a workshop director for the CUDC’s Making Our Own Space (MOOS) program, Ben works with youth throughout Cleveland, Ohio to influence their neighborhoods through design and construction.

Let us know you’re coming. RSVP on the Facebook event page and please spread the word!

View the CUDC’s full 2017 Fall Lecture Series.

 

09-11-17

Jacinda Walker Lecture | September 15

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Lecture: “Design Journeys: Strategies for Increasing Diversity in Design Disciplines”
Jacinda Walker
Friday, September 15th
12(noon)-1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

Join us at the CUDC this Friday at lunch for a talk by Jacinda Walker, the second event in our 2017 Fall Lecture Series. Jacinda Walker will discuss the objectives of her research work, “Design Journeys: Strategies for Increasing Diversity in Design Disciplines.” This solutions-based thesis presents fifteen strategic ideas to expose African-American and Latino youth to design-related careers. The interactive talk will reveal her research approach, illustrate the problems, share the design principles needed to close the diversity gap, and include the first groundbreaking updates on the Design Diversity Index project. Attendees will leave with a clear definition of this complex problem and a deeper appreciation of what is required from educators, parents, organizations, and designers of all disciplines to diversify our profession.

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The Design Journey Map, created by Jacinda Walker, is a tool to guide progress towards increasing diversity in the design fields.

Jacinda Walker is the founder of designExplorr, an organization that celebrates design learning by creating opportunities that expose African American and Latino youth to design. She also serves as Chair of AIGA’s Diversity & Inclusion Task Force. Walker has over 20 years of industry experience as a designer, entrepreneur, and instructor. Jacinda earned her BFA in graphic design from the University of Akron and an MFA in Design Research & Development with a minor in Nonprofit Studies from The Ohio State University. Her future goals include working with organizations to establish design education initiatives and to develop design programs for underrepresented youth.

For more information about the upcoming talk, please contact the CUDC at (216) 357-3434 or cudc[at]kent.edu

 

09-08-17

Watermark Project Summer Finale

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The CUDC, with partners Neighborhood Progress, artist Mimi Kato, and archaeologist Dr. Roy Larik, recently held their summer finale of events surrounding the Watermark project. The project seeks to evoke the memory of the Giddings Brook, a waterway buried and culverted in the early 20th century. Dee Jay Doc and Fresh Camp provided hip-hop entertainment, improvising lyrics about the history of the Giddings Brook, problems concerning lead in their neighborhoods, and other stories. Food, a rain barrel give-away, and an installation of the Watermark beach and pool also brought people out to the site.

 

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Giddings Brook is one of several waterways buried as the city developed in the early 20th century. The Brook holds history as a recreation, entertainment, and restorative place of gathering. Luna Park, a theme park, a Fresh Air Camp, and multiple healthcare facilities were located along the path of Giddings Brook before its ultimate burial. Watermark seeks to ask how else we might consider the use of existing waterways today, as well as those now buried in so many neighborhoods throughout the city.

 

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Watermark is made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

09-07-17

2017 CUDC Fall Lecture Series | Schedule

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We invite you to join us for our annual Fall Lecture Series at the CUDC. This semester’s theme for lectures and events is “ReMaking the City,” an iterative action that links the diverse range of speakers.

Most lectures are scheduled for Fridays from noon to 1pm and held in our CUDC conference room (1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200). All events are free and open to the public, but the Youth Maker Workshop and Habitat for Hard Places Boat Tour require reservations. Sign up for the CUDC mailing list to receive more information on how to register, when it becomes available.

We also plan to livestream our lunch talks on Facebook. Please follow Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative’s FB page to get updates on which events will be streamed online.

Check out the Fall Lecture Series schedule below or download an 11″ x 17″ poster (3.2 MB PDF). Feel free to hang the poster in your office or share via social media—we hope to have lots of new attendees this year!

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06-29-17

Post-Graduate Fellow wins Burning Man Grant

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Working study model for design approval.

The CUDC is happy to announce that our Post-Graduate Fellow Jonny Hanna has been awarded one of the highly prestigious Burning Man Global Arts Grants for his fellowship project “Forget Me Not.” The project is one of 20 such grants awarded to community-based art projects around the world. This year’s projects will take place in Tel Aviv, Bengaluru, Budapest, Kiev, and Cleveland to name a few!

The project was born out of the Cleveland Public Library’s 150th-anniversary planning process being undertaken by the CUDC. The project will culminate as an art installation and piece of permanent urban furniture in the plaza space of the Eastman Branch of the Cleveland Public Library. It will be comprised of a multi-rowed fabricated seating structure, and a framing apparatus for a 17’x14′ window which will look onto a newly programmed temporary performing arts and gallery space. The project will be complete by early August with an event to come. Please stay in touch via the blog or social media (@ksuCUDC) and we will post event details when finalized.

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Image above depicting initial collage submitted with letter of intent.

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Image submitted for the second round of jurying.