07-03-17

Kent’s CAED receives four applicants from ACE Mentor Program

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For almost three years, the CUDC’s Kristen Zeiber has participated in the local Cleveland chapter of the ACE Mentor Program, representing Kent State University as a Board Member and member of the Scholarship Committee.

ACE stands for Architecture, Construction, and Engineering. High school students at eight Cleveland-area schools (7 in the Cleveland Metropolitan School District plus one in Warrensville Heights School District) participate in this after-school program every two weeks with industry professionals, learning about the design and construction of the built environment around them. These industry mentors introduce students to the many career paths in the ACE industries and take them through a design project of their own to demystify the process.

ACE chapters exist all over the country, but Cleveland’s chapter is one of the largest and is notable for its close relationship with CMSD and for providing significant scholarships for ACE students to go on to higher education. High school seniors in ACE apply for scholarships through a series of essays and letters of recommendations, and local companies and institutions (including Kent State, plus the Cleveland AIA chapter) support their continuing education through donations.

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At the end of each school year, ACE holds a banquet to award scholarships and allow each team to present the year’s projects. On April 26, 2017, nine ACE teams presented their responses to the RFP, which called for new ideas for making healthy places. Each team had to come up with a design, figure out some preliminary materials and construction techniques, and even sketch out an overall budget, and then present to a panel of local practitioners.

This year, ACE distributed a four-year total of over $118,000 in scholarships to 21 graduating seniors. Most excitingly for Kent State, though, was that the College of Architecture and Environmental Design had FOUR applicants from this year’s ACE class. We’ve had two CAED students from ACE for each of the past two years, but four is our highest number so far. This year’s recipients are:

  • Anais Harris – Architectural Studies
  • Michael Mascella – Architecture
  • Cesar Sandate – Construction Management
  • Isidro Villa – Architecture

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Kent State has an agreement with ACE to match any scholarships for up to four incoming Architecture, Interior Design, and Construction Management students up to $1,500 / year each. In addition, Michael Mascella and Isidro Villa split the prestigious Cleveland Foundation Ward Scholarship, for students from the Cleveland area intending to study architecture. We’re looking forward to adding these energetic young students to our college and hopefully continuing to grow our involvement with ACE further in the future.

Congratulations to our four CAED ACE students, and all the ACE scholarship recipients!

For more information on the ACE Mentor Program, check out the national website or the Cleveland chapter Facebook page.

 

05-22-17

Bygone Landscapes of Cleveland and New Orleans: the conduit of the everyday

MH headshotMaggie Hansen, Director, Albert and Tina Small Center for Collaborative Design, Tulane University

This spring our Masters of Landscape Architecture students engaged in a studio with Maggie Hansen of Tulane UniversityMaggie worked with students at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative on a 5-week vertical studio titled “Bygone Landscapes of Cleveland and New Orleans: the conduit of the everyday”. This was a continuation of the Master of Landscape Architecture Traveling Workshop that took place in New Orleans over spring break.

This collaborative studio kicked off with the KSU students visiting New Orleans. Over 3 days, they visited sites designed to support both hydrological function and community gathering. In addition to site visits, they discussed design and policy approaches to urban hydrology with designers, policymakers, and planners, including Aron Chang of Blue House, Colleen McHugh of the City of New Orleans Office of Resilience, and Austin Allen and Diane Jones of Design Jones. The exchange between Tulane’s Small Center for Collaborative Design and the Kent State Landscape program revealed many shared challenges for Cleveland and New Orleans.

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The studio has been developed in conversation with the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District’s Project Clean Lake Program. In 2011, NEORD entered into a consent decree to address water quality issues in Lake Erie by capturing 98% of CSO – the highest level of capture nationally. This capture is primarily achieved through the construction of 7 deep storage tunnels, ranging from two to five miles long, up to 24 feet in diameter and located up to 300 feet underground – the tunnels hold water in a rain event and release it for treatment. As NEORSD has constructed these tunnels, they’ve acquired a series of parcels where tunnel access and construction staging has occurred. These sites will continue to be used for maintenance of the tunnels and the District recognizes the opportunity for the sites to serve as neighborhood amenities following construction. The studio is looking at the potential of these parcels to engage the layers of hydrology and neighborhood fabric more fully, in hopes to expand the range of possibilities for NEORD as the work continues. The students began the studio with visits to 3 sites in the Dugway watershed, and a tour of ‘restored’ sites with NEORSD, to see the sites under construction and some of the completed ‘parklets’ following construction. From these observations and an analysis of the site layers, the students developed ‘deep section’ models of the sites, as a means of understanding the complex, layered systems impacting each site, and as a starting point for design.

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The studio will deliver a booklet of conceptual ideas to the District following the 5-week studio. We will publish the booklet on our Issuu site when completed.

04-25-17

The Student Perspective : CUBA

This year’s Spring Studio, The International Design Exchange (INDEX) Studio is a graduate design studio established to build an understanding of global urban issues.The studio explores strategies for urban regeneration revealed through a comparative analysis of Cleveland, Ohio and Havana, Cuba. The studio functions as a timely conduit for the exchange of ideas between the two cities. As part of the studio, four graduate students traveled to Cuba, during spring break, to strengthen the research and relationships established with architects and architecture students and the University of Havana. Two of the students, Reuben Shaw II and Randy Hoover, shared their experience and work with us. Here is their perspective:

Reuben Shaw II, Master of Landscape Architecture

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Cuba was never on my list of countries to visit. Stories about the taboos of the society and the government subconsciously blocked this island nation from my view. I’ve visited a few of the Caribbean Islands but still, Cuba was invisible. During my stay in Havana, I realized that Cuba was one of the most unique and beautiful places I have ever been, not only aesthetically, but culturally and socially. The proverb, “Better to see something once than hear about it a thousand times” became a reality.

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Fanguito neighborhood in Havana, Cuba

While working on the Havana studio project in Cleveland, it was a challenge to really grasp our site with aerials; as landscape architecture students, most of our taught site-analysis techniques were void. Flying to Cuba and walking the streets of the Fanguito neighborhood really gave us a perspective that added to our repertoire. We discovered a sense of place that was generated by the people and an empirical expression of culture that you could only get by asking questions and adopting the lifestyle of the residents.

This opportunity to travel to Cuba was truly inspiring and has fueled my desire to travel and experience other cultures. I believe when you travel you learn as much about yourself as you do about the place. Knowledge of self not only enriches your being but that of the people around you.

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Proposed wetland preserve and aquatic bird habitat along the Almendares River in Havana, Cuba

Randy Hoover, Master of Architecture

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Five days is a short time in which one can be expected to engage with the unique cultural and economic values in a city like Havana, but I believe this trip was successful in that regard. Stepping out onto Cuban soil was not, as some of my friends back home predicted, like stepping back in time to a land where technology and science ceased to progress. Once you look past the aesthetic value of colorful old cars on the road you begin to see Cuba’s development over the last decades as an alternate timeline, similar to our own, where resources are more scarce but vitality and variety of life are never sacrificed.

(Now don’t get me wrong, riding from one side of Havana to the other in a candy-coated Pontiac is something that should be experienced by every visitor to the island.)

Our studio design/research project for the semester focused on an intervention near the Almendares River in El Vedado district of Havana. This land is known as the less affluent part of town and in every way but its social structure can be considered a slum. In order to operate from thousands of miles away with little on-site experience, our group focused on projective interventions that could be built by accretion and overlay of infrastructural services. By developing a simple self-built housing prototype that connected its infrastructure to a central square, we could game out the look of our neighborhood intervention in abstraction without bulldozing over the existing social and economic complexities of the neighborhood.

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Cuadriculita 008: The central concrete pad provides infrastructural connections for surrounding residents.

The realistic conditions of a site are, of course, more complex than what can be assumed from a satellite image or journal article. When we walked through the neighborhood of El Fanguito we were greeted by complete strangers with smiles and welcome conversation with our inquiring minds. Narrow alleyways and informal sidewalks contributed to a set of streetscapes that functioned almost identically to the winding paths we suggested in the Cuadriculita proposal, except of course that it was constructed with more care, personality, and efficiency. Once we walked out of the neighborhood and up the hill to a grand vista that overlooked all of the informal housing, my perspective of the project completely shifted.

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A small cluster of housing built against the peculiar topography separating El Fanguito from El Vedado.

I expected this moment, of course, but maybe not in such an instantaneous fashion. The infrastructural connections were not perfect in every way but formed its own artistry out of the imperfections. Overlap of aesthetics and use-value with the homes were most apparent with bright blue water storage barrels and pigeon cages on some of the rooftops feeding PVC piping down into the invisible pathways and living spaces below. Our project’s assertion that an interior courtyard or open space was required in order to have a vibrant and connected lifestyle for each resident was dissolved after seeing this.

This INDEX studio travel opportunity is something that I will remember for the rest of my life. I was able to meet Cuban architectural contemporaries, sample the passionate lifestyle of residents, and bond with my trip-mates in sharing this experience of infinite value. I’d like to thank David Jurca, the CUDC, and Kent State University for this amazing opportunity.

The INDEX: CLExHAV Studio is part of the 2017 Creative Fusion program supported by The Cleveland Foundation. During the 2017 Spring Semester, the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) will continue a partnership launched by Kent State University last year with Havana-based architects Sofía Márquez Aguiar and Ernesto Jiménez of Fábrica De Arte Cubano (Cuban Art Factory), a vibrant community arts space housed in a repurposed cooking oil plant in Havana. The architects will work with the KSU Urban Design and Landscape Architecture graduate studio and a Cleveland Institute of Art Interior Architecture studio on design proposals for two neighborhood projects: one in Havana’s Vedado neighborhood, where Fábrica De Arte Cubano is located, and another in Cleveland’s Glenville neighborhood. In early April, Márquez Aguiar and Jiménez arrived in Cleveland to review the students’ design proposals for Vedado and will remain in Cleveland for one month as they work with students to generate and fabricate the project to be built in Glenville. A public Pop Up Event is scheduled at the Glenville site (1470 E. 105th, Cleveland) on Friday, May 5th from 6-9pm. All are welcome. Learn more and RSVP on the Facebook event page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/532579883796334/ 

04-24-17

We’re Hiring | Post Graduate Fellow (Urban Design)

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Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) has a one-year position available for recent graduates holding a Master’s degree in Architecture, Urban Design, Landscape Architecture, or Planning. Eligible candidates must have graduated from a graduate program in one of these fields in 2016 or 2017. This is a full-time position with benefits, available beginning on September 1, 2017 or after.

Job Responsibilities

  • Working on urban design and planning projects for community clients, under the direction of CUDC senior staff
  • Supporting the Making Our Own Space (MOOS) design/build initiative for middle- and high-school students
  • Developing research proposals
  • Assisting with the organization and logistics of the annual community design charrette in the fall of 2017
  • Participating in graduate-level design juries and advising graduate students on their Capstone projects
  • Other tasks as assigned by CUDC staff

 

The Fellow will also develop a project of his or her choice, to be completed during the fellowship year. Examples of past projects include:

  • Presenting design work and research on environmental psychology in urban design at a conference of the Association for Community Design
  • Developing climate resilient street sections, expanding upon the City of Cleveland’s Complete and Green Street Guidelines, as part of the CUDC’s neighborhood climate resilience initiative.

 

Other potential fellowship project ideas include:

  • Planning and deploying a temporary installation or event
  • Entering a design competition or creating a design competition
  • Curating an exhibition for the CUDC gallery
  • Presenting work at a conference
  • Organizing a lecture, workshop, or other events

 

The Fellow’s project will be developed with the full support of CUDC staff. Up to 10% of the Fellow’s time (four hours per week) will be devoted to his or her project.

Eligibility
The Fellowship position is available to any graduate of a Master’s degree in Architecture, Urban Design, Landscape Architecture, or Planning program who completed his or her degree in 2016 or 2017. The CUDC will select one Fellow from the pool of applicants.

Application Process
To be considered for the Post Graduate Fellowship, please submit:

  • Application through the Kent State University website: https://jobs.kent.edu/postings/13424/
  • Resume
  • Portfolio
  • Letter of intent – in 500 words or less, please describe why you are interested in working at the CUDC and outline your idea for an independent project to be completed during your fellowship year. Please note that you do not need to have a fully developed proposal for your project, just an initial idea or a general direction you would like to pursue. CUDC will work with you during the first three months of the fellowship to develop your project idea, secure supplemental funding (if needed), and prepare a timeline for implementing the project within the fellowship year.

The application deadline is 5:00 p.m. Friday, June 2, 2017. Late applications will not be accepted.

In addition to your application through the Kent State University website, please submit your resume, portfolio, and letter of intent in PDF format to cudc@kent.edu. If your portfolio is too large to email, please share it with cudc@kent.edu using DropBox (https://www.dropbox.com).

Selection Criteria
Applicants will be evaluated based on:

  • Academic performance
  • Work experience
  • Quality of portfolio
  • Clarity of intent

Kent State University, an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer is committed to attaining excellence through the recruitment and retention of a diverse work force. Women, minorities, veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. If you require assistance, please contact Kent State University’s Employment Office at 330-672-2100 or by email at employment@kent.edu.

Salary
$40,000 per year. The Post Graduate Fellow will be a full-time employee of Kent State University, with a full benefits package. The position is a one-year appointment; the period of employment will not be extended beyond one year. This is an administrative position, which does not include the possibility of tenure.

Questions?
Contact David Jurca at djurca@kent.edu

03-21-17

Samantha Ayotte | April 07

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On April 7, 2017, we welcome Samantha Ayotte to our Spring Lecture Series. Her talk, “My Birthright”, will present findings from her cultural exploration through Israel for her Birthright trip. There will be a discussion about how cultural, political, and religious experiences can differ and how they can provide solutions for contemporary living.

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Samantha Ayotte is a second-year dual degree (M.Arch, M.UD) candidate from Cleveland, Ohio. She holds an undergraduate degree in Architecture from Kent State University. She enjoys the opportunity to design and understand urban design challenges and solutions for cities like Cleveland through contemporary means of investigation. She believes communities and shared experiences can positively impact urban design, and her work thus far has aimed to implement those elements.

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Please join us from 12 PM - 1PMFriday, April 7th. This event is free and open to the public.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

02-28-17

Lithuanian Architect Aurimas Širvys presents at Cleveland State University

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Levin College Forum Brown Bag Lunch Program Recovering Lithuania’s Architectural Cultural Heritage

A Presentation from Lithuanian Architect Aurimas Širvys
Monday, March 13, 2017
12:00 – 1:30 p.m.
Bonda Board Room 254
1717 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, Ohio 44115

Jointly Sponsored By the Levin College Forum Program and the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative

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Wooden synagogue in Ziezmariai, Lithuania under restoration. Photo: Aurimas Širvys

During nearly 50 years of Soviet occupation, buildings that were part of Lithuania’s cultural heritage, such as churches, monasteries, synagogues, and manor homes, were “re-purposed,” destroyed, or neglected.  Furthermore, news and education were highly controlled and politicized so that the public only heard a view of the country’s past that was distorted to serve the Soviet state.  As a result, much of the country’s cultural heritage was not known or well understood, especially by younger Lithuanians.

Since Lithuania regained its independence, architect Aurimas Širvys has advised individuals and organizations who have undertaken projects to restore the condition of existing buildings of cultural heritage.  He has also made studies of images of “lost buildings” and made two- and three-dimensional representations of those buildings so that the memory of such buildings can endure.

Mr. Širvys will discuss how he became interested in helping Lithuania recover its architectural cultural history and some of the restoration projects in which he has participated.

Please RSVP to m.s.schnoke@csuohio.edu

02-20-17

Students from Cleveland Compete in National ULI Competition

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This past month, graduate students from Kent State University, Cleveland State University, and Case Western Reserve University collaborated to partake in the ULI Gerald D. Hines Urban Design Competition. The competition asked students from design, planning, and finance backgrounds to join forces and produce a feasible real estate pro forma and design concept for a site on Chicago’s north side. The 25-acre site, situated along the Chicago River is part of a planned manufacturing district, while also seeing development pressure for housing and tech development. Students worked to produce schemes that included flex industrial space, university partnerships, transit-oriented development, affordable housing, and other development proposals. Teams also connected to Chicago’s new multi-use trail, the 606, crossing the river to create regional connections.

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Students worked in teams of five at the CUDC throughout the two-week process. Professionals from the local community including architects, planners, developers, and bankers all participated as advisors and critics throughout the process. Evening feedback sessions had students present their work to these audiences to gauge feasibility and clarity in their concepts. The local Cleveland ULI chapter helps sponsor the event each year. Four teams in total participated this year from five six different disciplinary backgrounds. Teams from the Cleveland cohort then submitted their proposals to compete in the national competition. Results from the national competition will be released later this month.

01-26-17

Macy Nordhaus Banghart | Feb 03

We’re very excited about our Spring 2017 Lecture Series. We start off with Macy Nordhaus Banghart from Aerotek. Marcy is a recruiter for Aerotek Architecture & Engineering.  She specializes in full-time permanent placements in the field of Architecture.  She works with firms all over Ohio to fill their open positions. She has been recruiting for just over 3 years and graduated from Kent State University with a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies.

Macy will be speaking about hiring trends in the field of architecture, what firms are looking for in a candidate, and helpful interview tips that aren’t so obvious. If you are a recent graduate, graduating this spring, or just looking for tips from a professional recruiter this is a lecture you will not want to miss.

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“Over the past three decades we’ve built an unrivaled culture and our unique, people-focused approach yields competitive advantage for our clients and rewarding careers for our contractors. Today we serve virtually every major industry, and we’ve placed exceptional people in hundreds of thousands of roles and positions. Everything we do is grounded in our guiding principles to build and nurture quality relationships that allow us to place quality people in quality jobs.” -Aerotek

Join us, Friday, February 3rd, from 12 -1 PM. As always, this lecture is free and open to the public.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

 

01-05-17

We’re Hiring a Part-Time Office Manager

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The College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) at Kent State University is seeking applicants for a part-time Administrative Clerk/Office Manager at our downtown Cleveland facility.  This position will provide part-time administrative, budget, and clerical support to the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, located in downtown Cleveland. The office manager will maintain all budget documents for projects and the facility; schedule meetings; make sure CUDC is open for business; greet visitors; grant front door entries; assist with student concerns.

Bookkeeping knowledge is required.

Position is Part-Time, 20 hours per week.

Monday through Friday, 8:30 am – 12:30 pm preferred.

Submit all required materials as an on-line application to KSU Human Resources.

To complete the process, go to: https://jobs.kent.edu/ (Position#998181)

Kent State University is an Equal Opportunity Employer

12-08-16

Advocating for Diversity: A Conversation with Michelle Barrett of NOMAS

michele crawford cropMichele Crawford presents her architectural research at the 2014 Design Diversity Powered by PechaKucha event in Cleveland, Ohio

Michele Crawford from Architecture firm Robert P. Madison International speaks with Michelle Barrett, the new president of the National Organization of Minority Architects Student Chapter (NOMAS) at Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design

by Michele Crawford

My inspiration to become an architect emerged from my educational journey. I did not have many architectural influences prior to my start on the path to architecture. My career goal was to become a car designer. I translated this ambition to the creation of interior environments and ultimately completed both a Bachelor of Science degree in Interior Architecture and Master of Architecture from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. The study of architecture in Chicago proved to be an amazing experience. My studio space was on the top floor of The Sullivan Center, formerly the Carson Pirie Scott Building, and I could easily visit historical examples of designs from Frank Lloyd Wright, Renzo Piano, Mies Van Der Rohe, Stanley Tigerman, and others. Using the city as my classroom provided enduring inspiration.

I noticed, however, the lack of admiration of both women and architects of color in the Chicago scene and worldwide. When my professors suggested architects to use as inspiration, they were rarely African American, and never African American women. It was through my own investigations that I found images of architects similar to myself and my culture. Gradually, Paul Revere Williams became my Mies. Norma Merrick Sklarek became my F.L. Wright. Dina Griffith became my Renzo. Sharon Sutton could eloquently express my angst—preparing me for the suppression of the African American voice and visibility in the profession.

In my current position as Project Designer at Robert P. Madison International, I am surrounded by a rich history of architectural contributions from an African American owned firm, currently led by Sandra Madison. I make special attempts to show my face to those who are considering pursuing a design career, and try to persuade those with interest.

Currently, the United States has under 400 licensed African American women architects, making up just under .4% of the greater architect population. We have a desperate need for more representation. The diversity rates nationally in architecture are not keeping up with the changing communities that the profession is called upon to serve. African Americans comprise 13.9% of Ohio’s population. Strikingly, Ohio has 2,650 licensed architects, but only 63 are African American—that’s only 2% of the profession. This disparity has been evident since the inception of the profession. In 2015, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) initiated a deeper conversation about this matter. The AIA surveyed its members and supporters about the perception of diversity and also examined the relationship of diversity to success in the field. Its closing analysis suggested changes in hopes of creating greater equality and more balanced numbers. Communities and demographics are steadily changing, yet, the demographics of the designers of these same spaces are not keeping pace.

As the new president of the National Organization of Minority Architects Student Chapter (NOMAS) at Kent State University, Michelle Barrett is working towards creating and sustaining a space of support for students of color in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED). We recently discussed her ambitions to move past potential and into action in the architecture world’s quickly approaching future. Though the Kent State diversity numbers in the architecture and design programs seem to align with the national averages, the opportunity for a NOMAS chapter to spark a change is hopeful. The current minority students, and specifically Michelle, seem to recognize the importance of support for students of color at Kent State and are working towards change.

Michelle and I had the following conversation about her experience leading the NOMAS Chapter and her plans for the future.

Design Awards Michele and MichelleLeft to Right: Terrance Pitts (Turner Construction), Michelle Barrett, Michele Crawford, Teresa Giralt (Turner Construction), Amir Allenbey at the AIA Cleveland Design Awards

 

Michelle Barrett
Hometown: Gaithersburg, MD
Class / Year: Class of 2017, 4th year
Major: Architecture

 

MC: How did you hear about Kent State?

MB: As many black youth, I thought my future was in sports. I played soccer all of my life up until I tore my ACL during my senior year. Kent State was on my list of schools (for soccer) because my coach had past connections. After it was clear that I wouldn’t be playing sports in college, I had to approach that list of schools differently. Which one would provide the best academic value? Kent State was the answer.

 

MC: What inspired you to pursue the architecture path?

MB: I have always been drawn to art and design. Probably because of my mother; she is a graphic designer. But I never really wanted to be an artist. I wanted to have an impact on people’s everyday lives, to help people. I didn’t know how or what career would allow me to do that. At an away soccer tournament in Miami, a player’s mother took us on a tour of Downtown Miami. She gave us a history lesson on all the Art Deco inspired architecture and the type of events that happened there. I fell in love. At that point I realized how I could be creative, yet impactful, in society.

 

MC: Why NOMAS? Why now? 

MB: I did not previously know about NOMA/NOMAS until CAED Associate Dean Bill Willoughby initiated discussions on the topic. He was and continues to be an integral part of NOMAS here at Kent. After the initial informational presentations he gave students, a group of us students took the lead in formalizing the organization. The other students involved included: Torri Appling, Shelton Finch, and Zai Abdi. I personally took ownership of the process because I thought it was important to have an organization devoted to minority issues (diversity, inclusion, fellowship, etc) in relation to architecture. It’s a unique niche that cannot be fully realized in groups such as Black United Students (BUS).

 

MC: Have you ever felt as if you were treated unfairly because of your gender or race?

MB: On many occasions, people are surprised to hear about my academic achievements—be it my choice of major or my honors standing. After many years, their surprise no longer catches me off guard. However, I still feel an injustice when said individuals expect you to be 10x better than your peers. They hold you to different standards and it is unfair.

 

MC: What has been you favorite studio project?

MB: My favorite studio project was in Third Year Studio—The Media Center Library—a part of the Cleveland International School masterplan. It was the first time we interacted with real clients—the community, the students.

 

MC: As president what are the main goals that you have for the organization?

MB: My main goals for the organization include career development (educational and professional), community engagement in the Greater Cleveland area, and to ensure that the NOMAS voice continues to be heard as a legacy organization in the future CAED community.

 

***

Historically, the voice of the African American architect has been suppressed. However, as our world continues to change, the profession seems to be committed to making the field a more inclusive and welcoming place for all. Organizations like Design Diversity are working to push accountability in this matter. Design Diversity, an advisory committee which grew out of Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC), is committed to educating, connecting, and celebrating diversity in the design professions. Specifically focusing on African American and Latino communities, this group has specific goals of awareness to the larger design community with hopes of encouraging authentic, diverse views and considerations within and throughout the design process. Ultimately, Design Diversity and NOMA/NOMAS are promoting the importance of varied voices in educational and professional design communities.

 

Michele Crawford, Assoc. AIA, is a Project Designer at Robert P. Madison International, based in Cleveland, Ohio. Michele serves on a number of service organizations, including the Design Diversity Advisory Committee. In 2016, Michele was recognized with the Activism Award by AIA Cleveland. Follow Michele on Twitter @initiat_ed.

 

 

References:

NCARB By the Numbers 2015
http://www.ncarb.org/About-NCARB/NCARB-by-the-Numbers/~/media/Files/PDF/Special-Paper/2015NCARBbytheNumbers.ashx

African American Architects Directory
http://blackarch.uc.edu/

Diversity in the Profession of Architecture
http://www.aia.org/aiaucmp/groups/aia/documents/pdf/aiab108092.pdf

African Americans in Ohio
https://development.ohio.gov/files/research/P7003.pdf

 

11-22-16

CUDC students win AIA Design Awards!

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This past Friday, the Cleveland chapters of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and International Interior Design Association (IIDA) hosted the 2016 Design Awards. The annual event honors work by local professionals as well as students. This year, CUDC students Caitlyn Scoville and Ziyan Ye received awards for their work in the 2016 summer studio; Home Economics: A State of Housing in Cleveland. Scoville was awarded the Honor Award—the highest award possible for her project “Lead Exposed,” while Ye received an Honorable Mention for his project “The Distributed Center.”

Caitlyn Scoville project Lead ExposedClick image to view full project. 

Scoville’s winning project examined housing demolition and redevelopment through a decision-making framework in relation to levels of lead contamination and environmental hazards in Cleveland’s neighborhoods. Her scheme addresses areas of lead concentration within the postindustrial landscape using a series of scales (regional, city, community, and individual) in order to alter the fabric over time. Scoville says of her work in the summer studio, “The studio allowed us to explore different scales of interventions, from the intimate to the city at large, and I think my passion for designing across these multiple scales was articulated in my final project”.

Ziyan Ye project The Distributed CenterClick image to view full project. 

Ye’s project examined new housing options near the proposed expansion of the Nord Family Greenway near University Circle and the Hough neighborhood to better integrate world class institutions and existing neighborhood needs. A variety of housing types and public spaces meet demands for high quality and affordable housing options across the economic spectrum. The proposed expanded greenway contextually weaves together multiple contexts, allowing for the development of multiple neighborhood anchors that tie in to a larger network.

11-01-16

ULI Competition Informational Session | Nov 4

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This Friday, November 4 at 6:00pm the CUDC will host an information session for the 2017 ULI Hines Urban Design Competition. The interdisciplinary competition will take place January 9-23 and welcomes graduate students from architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, real estate, MBA, urban planning and associated disciplines. In recent years, students from Kent State University, Case Western Reserve University, and Cleveland State University have received 4 honorable mentions, in the pursuit of a $50,000 grand prize.

Free food and drinks will be provided. If you are interested in attending the information session please contact Jeff Kruth of the CUDC at: jkruth@kent.edu

11-01-16

MUD Research Symposium | Nov 04

Please consider joining eleven Master of Urban Design students and Associate Dean, Bill Willoughby, this Friday, November 4, 11:00AM-1:00PM at the CUDC for a student-led conference we’re calling, Divergent Humanisms for Urban Space.

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2016 MUD Research Symposium participating students:

Samantha Ayotte, “AGRI-SOURCING: A Menu of Options for Food Production in the City”
Elizabeth Ellis, “The Memory of the City: An Argument for Place in an Impending Placeless World”
Morgan Gundlach, “The Secret Life of Autonomous Vehicles”
Megan Mitchell, “A Concern for Happiness in Urban Design”
Casey Poe, “Wanted: Cities for People”
Alexander Scott, “City: The Urban Canvas”
Caitlyn Scoville, “Toxicity”
Elizabeth Weiss, “The City is a Game”
Spencer White, “Be Ye a Foolish Virgin or a Wild One? Designing the City for a Wild 21st Century”
Connor Wollenzier, “A Retroactive Manifesto for Rem Koolhaas”
Ziyan Ye, “Vertical Urbanism”

Friday, November 4, 2016
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

This event is free and open to the public.

10-18-16

Akron Innerbelt Charrette | Recap

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On October 14-16, the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative took 18 of our grad students to Akron for an intense three-day design workshop, or “charrette”. The students came from our Masters of Architecture, Masters of Urban Design, and Masters of Landscape Architecture programs, plus Cleveland State University’s Masters of Urban Planning & Development program. We were also joined by six students & faculty from Lawrence Tech University in Detroit, plus CUDC alumni.

The three-day charrette examined Akron’s Innerbelt Removal site, the northern section of Highway 59 directly adjacent to Akron’s Downtown. Students, staff, and faculty formed four interdisciplinary teams to each produce a vision for the redevelopment of the site once it closes to vehicular traffic in the next year. They were charged with examining the current Innerbelt site and its linkages to the Downtown, surrounding neighborhoods, and larger region, in order to determine program, density, infrastructure, and character of new development & green space. How can a piece of highway previously perceived as a barrier be transformed into a meaningful connector, a piece of cohesive urban fabric, and a place in its own right?

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To tackle this complex and rich design problem, students first took tours of the site area with City of Akron Planning Director, Jason Segedy; presented preliminary research to a room of local stakeholders, who gave their own advice and feedback; and then got to work producing site analysis and redevelopment concepts. After 48 hours, they presented four schemes on Sunday, Oct 16th to community stakeholders.

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Final schemes addressed such specific topics as:

  • connectivity between the Downtown and the near-west side neighborhoods;
  • four-season recreation opportunities;
  • linking to the existing network of trails like the Towpath;
  • topographic shifts, grading, and landforming;
  • short-term, flexible programming of the roadway surface;
  • retrofitting adjacent Downtown buildings to face new Innerbelt development; and
  • affordable and diverse housing options for all ages and populations.

PowerPoint Presentation

PowerPoint Presentation

The 2016 CUDC Community Design Charrette was graciously supported by the City of Akron; the Knight Foundation; Summit MetroParks; NAIOP Northern Ohio Chapter; and the Mastriana Endowment/4M Company LCC.

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The charrette was recently featured in the Akron Beacon Journal. Read: “Reimagining Akron: Could 30 acres transform downtown into a place where millennials want to live?”

 

 

10-06-16

CAED Hiring Public Relations & Media Specialist

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The College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) at Kent State University is seeking applicants for a full‐time Public Relations and Media Specialist. Responsible for the creation, publication and dissemination of promotional materials, event planning and implementation, web and new media account curating. The position will oversee media communication efforts related to programming, content dissemination, student recruitment, advancement, and alumni relations.

This is a full-time position, located on the main campus in Kent, Ohio. For more information please view the complete job description here.

Submit all required materials as an on‐line application to KSU Human Resources. To complete the process, go to: https://jobs.kent.edu/postings/10885 (Position #989358)