11-06-19

The Architecture Play

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This Friday, November 8th from 5-7 pm, the next act of The Architecture Play is presented at the John Elliot Center for Architecture and Environmental Design, Kent State University, 132 South Lincoln Street in Kent, Ohio.

The Architecture Play is a collaborative multi-annual project by the A+D Architecture and Design Museum, Los Angeles and Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design.

Processed as either verb or noun, ‘play,’ despite its numerous instantiations, never obscures the most crucial aspect inherent to all of its forms and shades: a raw potential whose explorative drive pushes the states of being and knowledge, as well as the pre-existent boundaries of the physical and metaphysical environment, in a constant effort to derive value from play. Intimately entwined, play has thus accompanied scientific progress since before the Enlightenment.

The Architecture Play, a collaborative project conceived with these oscillating definitions in mind, similarly traces the ludic elements of the architectural discipline while projecting the potentialities of play beyond its preconceived limits. In four acts—a nod to its theatrical definition—the project constructs a complex ecology of actors and networks, of things and thoughts exchanged, transformed, and assembled to probe new avenues for pedagogy, practice, history, and theory of architecture; not simply transgressing boundaries but moving them altogether.

Organized by Ivan Bernal, Clemens Finkelstein & Anthony Morey, with participants Taraneh Meshkani, Katie Strand, Jon Yoder, Irene Chin, Gary Fox, Jia Gu, Lisa L. Hsieh, Kyle May, Antonio Petrov, and Leila Anna Wahba.

Produced with the support of Faith Chrostowski, Allison McClure, Benjamin Cyvas, Max Hentosh, Nick Ingagliato, Austin Keener, Vincent Noce.

10-15-19

Stepping out, Stepping in

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Please join us for a lecture by Jennifer Birkeland on October 24 at 6 PM at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200, Cleveland. Ring the intercom at the Euclid Avenue entrance for access to the second floor.

Jennifer Birkeland is a founding partner at op – Architecture Landscape in Brooklyn New York; and an Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at Cornell University in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. She is a licensed landscape architect in the state of New York, a LEED accredited professional and a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome. Jennifer received her Master of Landscape Architecture at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design and has a Bachelor’s of Science in Landscape Architecture from California Polytechnic State University Pomona.

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Her practice approaches design problems by exploring the oppositions established by the vantage points of the two disciplines of focus, landscape architecture and architecture, developing design solutions that strive to disintegrate the subject-object relationship conventionally established between Landscape + Building. Prior to starting her own practice, Jennifer worked on a wide range of projects with the internationally renowned offices of West 8, OLIN, and Ken Smith Workshop.

CEU credits (1.5) are available to OCASLA members.

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. For more information, contact cudc@kent.edu or 216.357.3434.

10-15-19

River, Nahr, Río Exhibition Reception

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Join Kent State University’s College of Architecture & Environmental Design and the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative to celebrate the designers who participated in River, Nahr, Río, a collection of work by Kent State architecture students, which is currently on display in the Cleveland Foundation’s lobby.

The project was a partnership with the Cleveland Foundation’s Creative Fusion: Waterways to Waterways Edition.

When:
Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2019
5-7 p.m.

Where:
Cleveland Foundation Lobby
1422 Euclid Ave.
Suite 1300
Cleveland, OH 44115

RSVP HERE

10-15-19

Spaces of Conflict Conference & Exhibition

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October 25, 2019 | College of Architecture & Environmental Design, Kent State University

Our built environment has always been affected and transformed by conflict.

Consequently, design professionals are directly or indirectly influencing the processes of conflict through infrastructural development, urban and architectural interventions, planning policies, and public space making. By bringing together scholars, educators, researchers, and practitioners, we aim to debate, exchange ideas, and theoretical perspectives on the role of space in relation to different forms of conflict.

The Spaces of Conflict conference is organized as part of the 50th Commemoration of May 4, 1970 event at Kent State where the Ohio National Guard shot four of the KSU students and injured nine during the demonstration event against the US war in Vietnam and Cambodia. This event triggered many nationwide protests and demonstrations in other universities.

Friday, October 25, 2019 | Conference begins at 9:00 AM.

The day-long event is free and open to the public but REGISTRATION is required. 

  • Keynote Lecture: Felicity D. Scott at 5:30 pm
  • Exhibit Opening at 6:45 PM in the Armstrong Gallery.
  • Speakers: Silvia Danielak | Delia Duong Ba Wendel | Tali Hatuka | Samia Henni | Tahl Kaminer | Dina Khatib | Taraneh Meshkani Deen Sharp | Aleksandar Staničić | Hazem Ziada

PROGRAM DETAILS | REGISTRATION  | CONTACT

 

09-12-19

CUDC Fall Lectures & Programs

Please join us for the CUDC’s Fall Lecture Series. All events are free open to the public.

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September  18 | Noon | CUDC Gallery
Quilian Riano, Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative | Negotiating Bodies

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September 25 | Noon | CUDC Gallery
Dominic Mathew, Fund for Our Economic Future | No Car » No Job, No Job » No Car

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October 2 | Noon | CUDC Gallery
David Jurca, Seventh Hill LLC | Design to Transform

October 7 | 5:30 PM | Cene Lecture Hall
College of Architecture + Environmental Design | Kent State University
Karen M’Closkey + Keith VanDerSys, peg landscape + architecture | Ground Control

 

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October 24 | 6PM | CUDC Gallery
Jennifer Birkeland, OP – Architecture Landscape | Stepping out, Stepping in

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October 31 | 9AM | Irishtown Bend Welcome Center, 1701 West 25th St.
Malaz Elgemiabby | OUTprint/INprint: What does dignity mean?

For more information, call 216.357.3434 or email cudc@kent.edu.

 

03-05-19

Student Teams Create Development Plans for Cincinnati Riverfront

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This January, three teams of graduate students from the Kent State CAED and Cleveland State competed in the Urban Land Institute Hines Student Competition. Running two weeks, the competition asks students to analyze an existing site in a North American city and develop a 10-year urban design & financing plan for the area. The competition is an opportunity for students in design & development to work together and understand how cities are developed in real-life scenarios.

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This year’s site was in Cincinnati, along the Ohio River but disconnected from the CBD by a major highway, Fort Washington Way. The students were charged with creating a cohesive mixed-use district that successfully wove this area back into larger urban and regional systems.

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Team “Syn City” harnessed urban agriculture & autonomous transportation to develop a scheme to grow and provide food for Cincinnati’s local urban neighborhoods in the heart of the city.

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Team “Over the Vine” extended Vine Street into a riverfront pier to make a strong connection with the Ohio River and through the CBD into the growing neighborhood of Over the Rhine.

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Team “Cincinnati Greenway” emphasized pedestrian-scale green connections throughout the development area, encouraging wandering and discovery.

The Cleveland chapter of ULI generously supports the student competition each year. Professionals from the local design & development community volunteer their time to assist on evening reviews & critiques. We’re grateful to all our professional partners for their support.

Congratulations to all our students for their hard work!

06-26-18

City of Dreams: Cleveland by Saurav Dhakal

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The Cleveland Council on World Affairs partnered with the U.S. Department of State to host a group of four professional Fellows from India, Pakistan, and Nepal through the program “Professional Fellows Program for Governance and Society.” While in Cleveland, the cohort was embedded within various nonprofit organizations and government entities as professional fellows eager to engage in cultural exchange, learn from their hosts, and provide a value-add to their organization or agency. Kent State’s CUDC was selected to host Saurav Dhakal, Founder of StoryCycle.com, a Nepal-based social venture. Saurav came to gain insights from the CUDC’s Making Our Own Space (MOOS) youth program. Following their stay in Cleveland, the group returned home to complete a “follow-on project” related to their fellowship.

The CUDC was honored to work closely with Saurav Dhakal during his stay. This is his Cleveland story…

When I landed in Cleveland during the 1st week of May 2018, the weather really surprised me. I had borrowed one warm coat thinking that it would be very cold but I had to buy a new umbrella due to the rain. The city is located on the southern shore of Lake Erie and the wind determines what the weather will be like in the city. I enjoyed my three weeks’ stay in Cleveland—walkable and cycle friendly.

IMG_20180520_200705Sunset from Cleveland’s North Coast Harbor.

I run a social venture, StoryCycle, in Nepal where I tell stories and map the stories of people, places, and products. I travel to promote different parts of the country. I also organize StoryCamps where we train young people on “how to collect stories and promote them on the internet”.  

IMG_20180521_091636Tree canopy provides a shaded path along Prospect Avenue from the hotel to the CUDC offices in downtown Cleveland.

StoryCycle collaborated with Google in late 2014 and organised Everest Story Camp to conduct a mapping project in the Everest region using 360 degree imagery.

While we were traveling to show the Google Maps Project to locals in April 2015, there was a big earthquake and we couldn’t move ahead. It took me six days to get back to my family. Everyone suffered due to the earthquake and I suffered, too.

After a few months, StoryCycle started a new campaign, “Build Your Own Place,” to support the rebuilding process. It served users with an online platform to understand, train, and participate in the rebuilding process at the earthquake affected areas.

It provided the people from the earthquake affected areas a place to put their stories along with the communities’ dreams. Besides, it helped the supporters to pick and support the projects they were interested in. The platform enabled people to meet their prospective investors.

Screen Shot 2018-06-24 at 11.00.31 PMScreenshot of the “Build Your Own Place” page on the www.storycycle.com website.

After the earthquake, we had political changes. We ratified a new constitution and a new federal structure. Now all national, provincial, and local level elections have been completed and we have a central government: 7 provincial and 753 local units (Municipality and Rural Municipality). It means we have 753 new cities but we don’t have appropriate youth friendly infrastructure and services. So, based on the learning of “Build Your Own Place” we are working on a new campaign/idea “Our Dream City”. The campaign aims to focus on empowering local youth and community institutions to take active part in designing and making their places vibrant by using technology. The campaign focuses on nurturing /attracting and retaining talent, expanding economic opportunities, and creating a robust culture of civic engagement.

saurav at la villa moosSaurav teaches MOOS students at La Villa Hispana how to document environmental features with photographs and GPS coordinates.

This working idea led me to Cleveland, Ohio, USA as a part of the Legislative Fellows Program via World Learning and Cleveland Council on World Affairs. I was placed at Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, where I followed one of their interesting programs, Making Our Own Space (MOOS), which “empowers youth with the skills to creatively transform their neighborhood public spaces. Through hands-on outdoor workshops, students design and construct environments and playscapes that are appealing and usable to their community.”

IMG_20180523_174037Discussing photographs during the Making Our Own Space workshop in Cleveland’s La Villa Hispana.

I had the chance to participate in a few workshops and work with youth participants of MOOS in Shaker Heights and La Villa Hispana. I liked the idea that young minds are designing and building projects that are really interesting. And the good part of this program is there are stories of youth—they produce a podcast about their life and city—Making Our Own Stories.

I also got a chance to revisit my idea and action plan. I am going to develop a crowdsourcing platform to collect stories, data, and map points from different cities. And facilitate/collaborate with different partners to design sustainable, livable, and smart place/cities by organizing Map Up Camps, Dream Camps, Story Camps, and Build Camps. This four series of camps is a mix of learning from MOOS. I have tried to customize it to our context and need.

I realize the ideas and thoughts of young people are the same everywhere. They love dreaming and imagination. Youth are dynamic and full of new ideas. We just need to give them space to explore and expand it.

Cleveland also gave me more ideas on locally grown food, drinks, and dreams.

If you would like to know more about my work, visit our website.

Saurav Dhakal
Founder, StoryCycle

 

04-23-18

We’re Hiring a Part-Time Office Manager

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The College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) at Kent State University is seeking applicants for a part-time Administrative Clerk/Office Manager at our downtown Cleveland facility.  This position will provide part-time administrative, budget, and clerical support to the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, located in downtown Cleveland. The office manager will maintain all budget documents for projects and the facility; schedule meetings; make sure CUDC is open for business; greet visitors; grant front door entries; assist with student concerns.

Bookkeeping knowledge is required.

Position is Part-Time, 20 hours per week.

Monday through Friday, 8:30 am – 12:30 pm preferred.

Submit all required materials as an on-line application to KSU Human Resources.

To complete the process, go to: https://jobs.kent.edu/ (Position#998191)

Kent State University is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

03-22-18

Call for Papers | Alternatives to the Present | June 5

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The CUDC and CAED are excited to host an interdisciplinary conference on the future of urban agendas. The “Alternatives to the Present” conference will take place November 1-2, 2018 in Cleveland. This call for papers seeks a wide array of projects, propositions, and disciplinary critique from the fields of architecture, planning, sociology, urban geography, and allied disciplines. The conference is in collaboration with The Architecture, Media, Politics, Society (AMPS) platform, which is an international nonprofit research organization.

Abstracts are due June 5, 2018 and registration opens July 1, 2018. Any questions should be directed to CUDC Senior Urban Designer Jeff Kruth: jkruth@kent.edu

 

02-12-18

Call for Proposals! 2018 Midwest Urban Design Charrette

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This fall, the CUDC and our three academic partners – Lawrence Technological University’s College of Architecture and Design in Detroit, MI; the State University of New York at Buffalo in Buffalo, NY; and Ball State University’s Urban Design Center in Indianapolis, IN – will bring graduate students in urban design, architecture, and landscape architecture to a selected community for a 3-4 day intensive design workshop (or charrette). The Midwest Urban Design Charrette has been conducted for seven consecutive years, most recently traveling to Detroit, MI in 2017 and Akron, OH in 2016.

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The CUDC is looking for a community partner from a city, suburb, town, or neighborhood in western New York; northwestern Pennsylvania; northern Ohio; northern Indiana; or the lower peninsula of Michigan, facing a unique urban design or planning challenge and in need of fresh ideas and perspectives.

This year, the Midwest Urban Design Charrette is specifically seeking communities with issues related to one or more of the following areas of interest:
• resilience to the impacts of climate change;
• environmental justice;
• patterns of migration into or out of a community, either domestically or internationally; and
• immigrant communities.

If you’d like for your community to be considered for this year’s charrette, please send a brief proposal no later than April 2, 2018 to cudc@kent.edu. Please see our full RFP in .pdf format here for submission details.

Thank you for your interest, & we hope to hear from you soon!

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11-14-17

2017 Midwest Urban Design Charrette: North End Narratives

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Each year, Kent State University partners with graduate students at Lawrence Tech University and Ball State University for our Midwest Urban Design Charrette, a weekend-long design workshop where we collectively tackle an urban design project. Last year the CUDC hosted our visiting universities here in Northeast Ohio, working on the Akron Innerbelt redevelopment site. This year, we were all excited to caravan up to Lawrence Tech’s beautiful facility in Midtown Detroit.

Over the weekend of October 20th through the 22nd, CUDC staff and students, plus a few Cleveland State University planning students, teamed up with our counterparts at Lawrence Tech and Ball State, working collaboratively between design disciplines. Three teams generated distinct ideas for the future of the Oakland Avenue Commercial Corridor in Detroit’s North End neighborhood.

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The North End is known for its Motown past, its rich and collaborative arts culture, and its recent forays into large-scale urban agriculture. As development pressure increases in the Midtown neighborhood to the south, the North End could face new market demand and resulting development opportunities; however, many community members have specific concerns and ideas about what shape those opportunities should take. The students’ task across the weekend was not merely to generate realistic design ideas, but to do so while navigating a complex social fabric already existing in the neighborhood.

team1_axoGroup 1 design idea. 

Over an intense 48 hours, the students visited the site, including unique neighborhood assets like a schvitz (a historic public bathhouse) and an urban farm. After a team dinner, we all rolled up our sleeves and got to work. Saturday afternoon each team presented their initial ideas to the community, who had useful and specific feedback; the teams were able to take their input into their final design proposals. The final presentations, on Sunday afternoon, found a receptive community heartened by the incremental and pragmatic ideas for how to move their existing commercial corridor into a new and inclusive future.

team2_2Group 2 design idea.

The final design ideas will be shepherded by our Lawrence Tech University partners, and assembled into a report with ideas for implementation. We look forward to revisiting the North End again the next time we’re fortunate enough to visit our neighbors to the north (maybe to check out the Schvitz now that it’s open again!). Thanks to Lawrence Tech for hosting another successful Midwest Urban Design Charrette!

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group3_afterGroup 3 design idea.

 

11-09-17

Emma López-Bahut Lecture | November 17

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Lecture: “From landscape to project: Rethinking Gallicia’s rías”
Emma López-Bahut
Friday, November 17th
12(noon) — 1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

Join us this Friday for our 2017 Fall Lecture Series, featuring Emma López-Bahut. She will discuss how one of the fundamental keys to rethink the “ría” it is to involving citizens: from an initial awareness of the problem through to a decision of a democratic and responsible manner. Her research approaches the problem from different scales: rethinking the “ría” from landscape, city, and housing.

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Emma López-Bahut is a Lecturer in the School of Architecture at the University of Coruña (Spain) and currently Visiting Faculty in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State University. She publishes and lectures widely on her two research areas: “Space, Art and Architecture” and “bottom-up” processes in architectural design at different scales, from housing to landscape. Her new book on the hybrid work of sculptor Jorge Oteiza —Jorge Oteiza y lo arquitectónico: De la estatua-masa al espacio urbano (1948-1960)— was nominated for the 2017 Premis FAD Pensament i Crítica Award. Emma holds a Ph.D. in Architecture from the University of Coruña, an M.Arch from the University of Navarra, and a B.A. in Architecture and Urbanism from the Technical University of Madrid.

Emma López-Bahut’s lecture coincides with our Master of Landscape Architecture Program Open House. So if you are considering studying landscape architecture, please join us for the full day. You can find out more information and RSVP here.

10-30-17

Urban Land Institute’s Gerald Hines Real Estate Competition | Info Session

jeffblog2017 Competition Entry. 

Lecture: “Urban Land Institute’s Gerald Hines Real Estate Competition”
Jeff Kruth
Friday, November 3rd
12:00 PM — 1:00 PM & 5:30 PM
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

This Friday, November 3rd an introduction the Urban Land Institute’s annual Urban Design Competition will take place. The competition asks graduate students from design, planning, and business backgrounds to collaboratively work towards a vibrant and financially viable urban design scheme in cities across North America. In past years, KSU CUDC students have worked with CSU’s Levin students, and CWRU’s Weatherhead students to compete for a $50,000 prize.

A lunch lecture at 12:00pm will give an overview of the competition with coordinator, Jeff Kruth and  former student competitors. At 5:30pm, an information session with free beer and pizza will ask interested students to think about forming teams. The competition takes place January 15-29.

render 32015 Competition Entry (click to view larger). 

10-23-17

Welcome Cat Marshall | October 27, 2017

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Join us in welcoming the new Master of Landscape Architecture Coordinator, Cat Marshall. A reception will be held at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative from 4:30-6:00 PM.

Professor Marshall joins us from Louisiana State University’s, Robert Reich School of Landscape Architecture, the country’s top ranked undergraduate Landscape Architecture program, where she taught since 2003 at the rank of Associate Professor with tenure since 2009. Professor Marshall holds a Master in Landscape Architecture from Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design, where she began her teaching career, and a Bachelor of Arts in Architectural History from Ithaca College. As a Landscape Architect, she maintains her own practice, CSM Design, LA.

We hope to see you there!

Friday, October 27, 2017
4:30-6:00 PM
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

10-04-17

Kristen Zeiber Lecture | October 6

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Lecture: “Scaling Up: Design with People and Places
Kristen Zeiber
Friday, October 6th
12(noon) — 1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

RSVPs encouraged on Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/573039656153285/

In her talk, Kristen will speak about navigating scales, from architecture to urban design to regional design, in her exploration of the connection between people and the places they live. Work presented ranges from small-scale design/build to watersheds, from the post-Katrina Gulf Coast to post-coal Pennsylvania. She argues that across all scales, designers should work for people, and with respect for their relationship to the landscapes where they have chosen to live—even if those places have environmental or economic risk.

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Kristen Zeiber is a Project Manager, Urban Designer, and Adjunct Faculty at Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC). She has been with the CUDC since 2013, and contributes to the organization’s neighborhood planning, research, mapping, and student advising. She also teaches the annual Midwest Urban Design Charrette for Masters students in Architecture and Urban Design in collaboration with several other universities. She is on the Board of Directors and co-chairs the Scholarship Committee for the Cleveland chapter of ACE Mentors, a nonprofit extracurricular program which introduces high school students to the Architecture, Construction, and Engineering professions.

Kristen’s previous Community Design Center and Design/Build experience includes over four years post-Katrina at Mississippi State University’s Gulf Coast Community Design Studio in Biloxi, MS, with founder David Perkes; and short internships with the Center for Urban Pedagogy in New York and the Yestermorrow Design/Build School in Vermont. She holds a MS in Architecture Studies (SMArchS-Urbanism) from MIT, and a Bachelor’s of Architecture from Penn State University.

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