09-15-16

Mark Souther | Sept 23

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On September 23rd we welcome Mark Souther to our Fall Lecture Series. His talk is titled, “Cleveland Historical at Five: Reflections on a Half-Decade of Curating the City”. He will be speaking at the CUDC from 12 – 1 PM. This lecture is free and open to the public.

Souther shares the pioneering history app that curates Cleveland through hundreds of location-based stories. He also suggests the transformative place-making and community-building potential of digital storytelling.

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Mark Souther is Professor of History and Director of the Center for Public History + Digital Humanities at Cleveland State University. He directs the Cleveland Historical app project and is the author of a number of books and articles on American urban history.

If you can not make the lecture we will be live streaming the talk on our Facebook page starting 12 PM. 

09-15-16

Charles Waldheim | Oct 6

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This fall, the long-awaited Third Coast Atlas will be published by Actar. In conjunction with the release of the book, Charles Waldheim, one of the editors, will give a public presentation about urban futures in the Great Lakes region at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative as part of our Future City Sessions. Join us on October 6, 2016 at 5:30 PM. This event is free and open to the public, but RSVP is requested.

Charles Waldheim is a Canadian-American architect and urbanist. Waldheim’s research examines the relations between landscape, ecology, and contemporary urbanism. He is an author, editor, or co-editor of numerous books on these subjects, and his writing has been published and translated internationally. Waldheim is John E. Irving Professor at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Design where he directs the School’s Office for Urbanization. Waldheim is the recipient of the Rome Prize Fellowship from the American Academy in Rome; the Visiting Scholar Research Fellowship at the Study Centre of the Canadian Centre for Architecture; the Cullinan Chair at Rice University; and the Sanders Fellowship at the University of Michigan.

The Future City Sessions are an on-going explore of emerging ideas in urban design and city-making made possible by the support of The George Gund Foundation.

AICP|CM credits will be provided for this event, sponsored by APA Cleveland

Thursday, October 6, 2016

5:30pm – 7:00pm

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

RSVP HERE

09-13-16

INDEX Studio: Cleveland x Havana Report

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The INDEX studio examined the relationships between two cities–Cleveland, Ohio and Havana, Cuba. The 15-week studio took place in the spring of 2016 at Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC). By comparing these very different urban contexts, the studio provided new insights into familiar places and a better understanding of the challenges facing global cities.

Read and download the full report, written in English and Spanish, below.

Twelve graduate students generated proposals for a waterfront site in each of the two cities. The Cleveland site is the now-defunct Lakeshore Coal Plant, a monumental structure on a 60 acre site along the city’s eastern lakefront. The Havana counterpart is the Nico-Lopez Oil Refinery, a 500 acre facility still functioning as a refinery on the southeastern banks of Havana Bay.

Ash Pond ParkGraduate students Alexander Scott and Jordan Fitzgerald re-envisioned the Lakeshore Coal Plant as a regional destination for industrial arts preservation and production, located in close proximity to Cleveland’s University Circle arts and culture district.

Proposed Havana Bay Waterfront DevelopmentGraduate student Morgan Gundlach examined the opportunities to incorporate the 5′ (1.50 m) sea-level rise expected by 2100 by creating a dynamic ribbon of green spaces along Havana Bay’s waterfront.  

Students met with a range of design professionals and local experts while in Havana. These insights and direct observations gathered during the five day travel formed the basis of urban design proposals shown in the report. At the conclusion of the studio, students received feedback on their proposals from Cuban architects Ernesto Jimenez and Sofia Marquez Aguiar during the architects’ visit to Cleveland. The students’ design work will be exhibited in Havana, at the Fabrica de Arte Cubano, in Spring 2017.

The INDEX Studio is part of the curriculum for the Master of Architecture and Master of Urban Design programs in Kent State’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED). Kent State is committed to global education and expanding the cultural literacy of our students. Cuba offers a remarkably complex and locally relevant range of design opportunities. This initial studio is a first step toward establishing relationships with colleagues and collaborators in Cuba.

View and download the full report below:

Support for the travelling studio was generously provided by The Cleveland Foundation.

09-08-16

Students Study Housing Alternatives for Cleveland

This summer’s graduate studio at the CUDC focused on issues of housing in the city of Cleveland. Eleven graduate students in architecture and urban design selected sites across the city to develop a strategy for housing various ages, incomes, and forms of collective living. Titled “Home Economics: The State of Housing in Cleveland,” the studio used interdisciplinary methods for making site determinations and strategies—combining urban planning, community development, and design thinking to aspects of their project. Students studied the recent Vacant Property survey released by the CUDC with Thriving Communities Institute and other studies to suggest alternative forms of development in neighborhoods across the city. Strategies ranged from urban systems questions relating to lead contamination in housing, to dispersed housing strategies that attempt to introduce affordability as a stabilizing factor both in gentrifying neighborhoods and in under-invested neighborhoods.

The studio marks the culmination for Master’s of Architecture students at the CUDC, while students in the Urban Design program will continue into capstone research.

Below are examples of some of the student’s work featured in the report.

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images for blog post-2Student Caitlyn Scoville’s project examined methods for remediation, demolition, and development in neighborhoods with high lead concentrations.

images for blog post-3Student Lizz Weiss’ “Aff the Grid” project introduces new models of affordable housing and collective living.  

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images for blog post-6Student Elizabeth Ellis’ project provides housing options for immigrant populations that allow inhabitants to determine the degree of assimilation they wish to undertake in the community. 

08-30-16

Sara Zewde | Sept 06


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We are excited to kick off our Fall Lecture Series with Sara Zewde, Designer at Gustafson Guthrie Nichol. Sara’s talk, “Design at the Margins of the Urban Renaissance”, will be at the CUDC on Tuesday, September 6th, from 12 -1 PM.

Urbanism is in the midst of a renaissance. Many cities are witnessing large investments in urban infrastructure, development, and civic institutions — even those whose populations are not increasing. Yet still, the design associated with this renaissance provokes tension. Design projects by Zewde located in Houston and Rio de Janeiro will be presented as a departure point for a dialogue on resolving this tension, and pushing design towards a more robust, and culturally relevant, practice.

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Sara Zewde is a designer at Gustafson Guthrie Nichol. She holds a Master of Landscape Architecture from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, a Master of City Planning from MIT, and a BA in Sociology and Statistics from Boston University. Sara was named the 2014 National Olmsted Scholar by the Landscape Architecture Foundation and a 2016 artist-in-residence at the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation. Sara writes and lectures in the discourses of landscape architecture and urbanism and is the recipient of a number of awards, including the Silberberg Memorial Award for Urban Design and the Hebbert Award for Contribution to the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT.

Concurrent to working at Gustafson Guthrie Nichol, Sara continues independent design work in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Houston, Texas; and New Orleans, Louisiana. Sara finds that in considering the relationship between ecology, culture, and craft, there are often many powerful departure points for design. Her work is currently on display at the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale’s Brazilian pavilion.

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Sara will also be speaking at Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) on September 6th, starting at 5:30 PM in the Cerne Lecture Hall. Her talk at the CAED is titled, “Ecologies of Memory”. Both events are free and open to the public. RSVP is not required but requested, please click here.

If you can not make the lecture we will be live streaming the talk on our Facebook page starting 12 PM. 

View our full list of 2016 Fall Lectures here. 

08-09-16

VACANT: ABANDONED / EMPTY / OPEN by Jane Rossman

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Jane Rossman is a summer intern here at the CUDC. She is a rising senior at Bryn Mawr College, majoring in the Growth and Structure of Cities. She will be speaking at CUDC on August 15th at 12:00 PM. Her lecture will feature the culmination of Jane’s research on the successes and failures of government, community development and residents’ responses to vacant space and properties in the Hough neighborhood and possible remedies. We asked her to write a blog piece as well, as this year marks the 50th anniversary of the Hough Uprising—encouraging conversations concerning the history of the neighborhood as well as issues of housing, education, and community development.

VACANT: ABANDONED / EMPTY / OPEN
by Jane Rossman

Jane_blog_1Click image to view larger. Clearance Sections and Project Boundaries, East Hough highlighted, University-Euclid General Urban Renewal Plan, City Planning Commission, Jack Meltzer Associates, November 15, 1960. Public Administration Library.

The transformation of Hough to the empty land it is today began many years before the summer of 1966. Redlining, blockbusting, absentee landlords, and homes bursting at the seams from overcrowding all defined Hough in the 1950s. Slowly the few open spaces became the highlights of the dense neighborhood.

The need for more open space and better housing was answered in policy, but abandoned with lack of enforcement. The promise of renewal was denied. Instead, Hough was faced with slum clearance that left vacant space and increasing dilapidation. Promises abandoned along with increasing racial tension fueled a burning frustration that boiled over in the week long Uprising.

Razing the neighborhood to the ground left the abandoned Hough with more emptiness and blight than residents could handle. The population was reduced to a third its previous number — Hough was transformed into a landscape of the abandoned and empty.

Empty space is the breeding ground for the grass-roots. Hough Area Development Corporation (HADC), Famicos and a community determined to remain and revitalize the neighborhood began the slow path of reversing vacancy. Yet, how does one succeed when there is more empty space than structures and many of the remaining structures are so deteriorated they will soon be felled, adding to the emptiness?

How can one renew the empty space from abandonment to openness and places of intention?

Urban farms and gardens, residents rehabilitating and constructing their own homes, art programs outreach, and local organizations efforts have all helped stimulate change in the neighborhood. The areas currently considered for economic development and transit oriented development, though, do not completely reflect the possible opportunities in Hough.

Jane_blog_2_smallClick image to view larger. Hough Sustainable Development Patterns, (2013), Cleveland City Planning Commission overlaid with Vacant Properties Inventory: Vacant Structures and Land, (2016), Western Reserve Land Conservancy.

Jane_blog_3_smallClick image to view larger. Ward 7 Current Development Projects and Economic and Transit Nodes, Hough highlighted, Hough Development Corporation Short Term Plan (3-5 years), (1987) HDC, Public Administration Library.

These hubs of development constructed by local initiatives from the past 40 years create openings for economic development and further exploration of innovative intervention.

08-02-16

CUDC’s 3rd Annual Crooked River Commute

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This summer, August 26-27, Kent State University faculty and staff will embark on the 3rd Annual Crooked River Commute. This kayaking trek along the Cuyahoga River from Kent State University’s main campus (Kent) to Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (Cleveland) is intended to promote the river as a shared regional asset for education, recreation, and sustainability.

Cheer us on as we paddle into the Great Lakes Burning River Fest

Meet us at the finish of the trip. We should arrive in Cleveland on Saturday, August 26th, around 7:15 PM. Grab a beer at the Coast Guard Station during The Burning River Festival and watch us paddle in.

Follow us for updates. 

We’ll keep everyone posted on trip details through the CUDC’s social media accounts.
Follow us at: crookedrivercommute.org
Facebook: ksuCUDC 
Twitter: @ksuCUDC
Instagram: @ksuCUDC

Share our story.

Tell your friends, family and social network about the Crooked River Commute. We’ll be using social media during the trip, using hashtag: #RiverCommute

Learn More. 

Read our summary to learn more about the back story and goals of this trip. 

2015 photos

2014 photos

07-07-16

Call for Submissions | Future City Sessions Pamphlet 4: Age-Friendly Cities

The CUDC seeks written or graphic submissions for its Urban Infill publication. Urban Infill is the journal of Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative. The upcoming issue (Urban Infill 8) will be a series of pamphlets, bound together, that explore five broad topic areas in urban design and city-making. Pamphlet 4: Age-Friendly Cities is part of an initiative launched by the CUDC and with support from the George Gund Foundation called the Future City Sessions. The Future City Sessions are about informing practice—how can we anticipate emerging urban trends and embed them into current urban design practice? Submissions of realized urban projects, speculative designs, texts, and photo essays are encouraged for the August 26th deadline. Text is limited to 1000 words.

Pamphlet 4: Age-Friendly Cities seeks to address the following questions:

  • What changes to a city’s physical and social infrastructure are needed to make them more age-inclusive?
  • What projects and amenities are serving the needs of seniors well?
  • How can we reconsider the development and spatial model of senior developments to enable alternative forms of community?
  • Are there cities in the US of elsewhere that are especially well-suited to the needs of the aging populations? What can be learned from these places, and in what ways can we foster better environments in all cities?

Please send your work to cudc@kent.edu and include “Urban Infill” in the subject line of your email. Entries are due August 26, 2016.

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Click image to view larger. 

06-27-16

We’re Hiring | Post Graduate Fellow (Urban Design)

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Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) has a one-year position available for recent graduates holding a Master’s degree in Architecture, Urban Design, Landscape Architecture, or Planning. Eligible candidates must have graduated from an accredited graduate program in one of these fields in 2015 or 2016.

This is a full-time position with benefits, available beginning in August 1, 2016 or after.

Job Responsibilities
The Post Graduate Fellow will be a full-time member of the CUDC staff for one calendar year. Job responsibilities will vary, but may include:

  • Working on urban design and planning projects for community clients, under the direction of CUDC senior staff
  • Developing research proposals in partnership with CUDC staff
  • Assisting with the organization and logistics of the annual community design charrette, to be held in the fall of 2016
  • Participating in graduate-level design juries and advising graduate students on their Capstone projects
  • Working with incoming students to help them become acclimated to Cleveland and the CUDC
  • Assisting in the editing, production, and marketing of the CUDC’s annual journal, Urban Infill
  • Monitoring the use of CUDC facilities (especially the laser cutter and foam cutter)
  • Other tasks as assigned by CUDC staff

In addition to these responsibilities, the Fellow will develop a project of his or her choice, to be completed during the fellowship year. Examples of past projects include:

  • Presenting design work and research on environmental psychology in urban design at a conference of the Association for Community Design
  • Developing climate resilient street sections, expanding upon the City of Cleveland’s Complete and Green Street Guidelines, as part of the CUDC’s neighborhood climate resilience initiative.

Other potential fellowship project ideas include:

  • Planning and deploying a temporary pop up event
  • Entering a design competition or creating a design competition
  • Curating an exhibition for the CUDC gallery
  • Presenting work at a conference
  • Organizing a lecture, workshop, or other event

The Fellow’s project will be developed with the full support of CUDC staff. Up to 10% of the Fellow’s time (four hours per week) will be devoted to his or her project.

Eligibility
The Fellowship position is available to any graduate of a Master’s degree in Architecture, Urban Design, Landscape Architecture, or Planning program who completed his or her degree in 2015 or 2016. The CUDC will select one Fellow from the pool of applicants.

Application Process
To be considered for the Post Graduate Fellowship, please submit:

  • Application through the Kent State University website: https://jobs.kent.edu/postings/9186/
  • Resume
  • Portfolio
  • Letter of intent – in 500 words or less, please describe why you are interested in working at the CUDC and outline your idea for an independent project to be completed during your fellowship year. Please note that you do not need to have a fully developed proposal for your project, just an initial idea or a general direction you would like to pursue. CUDC will work with you during the first three months of the fellowship to develop your project idea, secure supplemental funding (if needed), and prepare a timeline for implementing the project within the fellowship year.

The application deadline is 5:00 p.m. Friday, July 22, 2016. Late applications will not be accepted.

Please submit your resume, portfolio, and letter of intent in PDF format to cudc@kent.edu. If your portfolio is too large to email, please share it with cudc@kent.edu using DropBox (https://www.dropbox.com).

Selection Criteria
Applicants will be evaluated based on:

  • Academic performance
  • Work experience
  • Quality of portfolio
  • Clarity of intent

Kent State University, an equal opportunity, affirmative action employer is committed to attaining excellence through the recruitment and retention of a diverse work force. Women, minorities, veterans, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. If you require assistance, please contact Kent State University’s Employment Office at 330-672-2100 or by email at employment@kent.edu.

Salary
$40,000 per year. The Post Graduate Fellow will be a full-time employee of Kent State University, with a full benefit package. The position is a one-year appointment; the period of employment will not be extended beyond one year. This is an administrative position, which does not include the possibility of tenure.

Questions?
Contact David Jurca at djurca@kent.edu

 

 

 

06-27-16

5×5 : Participatory Provocations | Exhibition at CUDC July 11 – August 24

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5×5 : Participatory Provocations is an exhibit of 25 architectural models by 25 young American architects. 5 contemporary issues, each addressed by 5 firms. It will be exhibited at the CUDC from July 11 – August 24. There will be an opening reception at 5:30 PM on July 11th, along with a panel discussion with curators Kyle May, Julia Van Den Hout, and Kevin Erickson, as well as participants, Michael Abrahamson and Jonathon Kurtz.

Architecture as a profession struggles to simultaneously engage with the public and be provocative within the confines of its own field. Either arguments and proposals get “dumbed down” or they simply aren’t accessible or relevant. This exhibit argues for participatory criticism. Twenty-five young architects engage in a series of significant popular issues, taking clear stances and producing a physical expression or provocation as a means of communicating with a larger public. Each team responds to one of the five prompts — contemplating the future of drone deliveries, the consequence of the construction of extreme luxury highrises as financial investments, luxury tourism on the moon, the fictional development of NSA community branches, and the potential construction of an anti-immigration wall on the border between the United States and Mexico.

The avant-garde in architecture has for decades captured its imaginations via two-dimensional representations, but this exhibit asks architects to be just as provocative in three dimensions. Each team produces only a single model and short text on one of the prompts. The selected topics intend to provoke, but are grounded in issues we face today. Architecture has a seat at each discussion.

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5×5: Participatory Provocations is curated by Kyle May, Julia Van Den Hout, and Kevin Erickson. 

Kyle May, principal at KMA, which he founded in 2014. He also co-founded CLOG in 2011, where he is the Editor in Chief. He is a registered architect in New York and Ohio. He is a graduate of Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design, where he completed the Master of Architecture program at the CUDC.

Julia Van Den Hout is founder of Original Copy, and co-founder and Editor of CLOG. As Original Copy, she is currently producing TEN Arquitectos’s new monograph, as well as a book on expos and world’s fairs centered around the Milan Expo 2015. Prior to founding Original Copy, Julia was the Director of Press and Marketing at Steven Holl Architects for six years, where she was responsible for developing and coordinating the PR strategy for over 30 projects and competitions, organizing the opening and publication of 12 completed projects, and the coordination of multiple traveling exhibitions. She has a Master’s Degree in Design Criticism from the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

Kevin Erickson is a designer in New York City (KNE studio), and an Associate Professor in the School of Architecture at the University of Illinois. He is on the Program Leadership Council at the Van Alen Institute, was a Visiting Professor at the Mackintosh School of Architecture in Glasgow, and an Artist-in-Residence at the Geoffrey Bawa Lunuganga Trust in Sri Lanka.

5×5 : Participatory Provocations

Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1
309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

July 11 – August 24, 2016

The exhibition will be on view M-F 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM*
*7/18-22 please call 216.357.3434 for our availability, may be limited due to the RNC. 

Opening reception & panel discussion
July 11 at 5:30 PM

 

06-21-16

Cut the Cord by Sam Friesema

Our Post Graduate Fellow, Sam Friesema, will be leaving the CUDC after his year of service. The CUDC created the one-year position for graduates of KSU’s Master of Architecture, Master of Urban Design, or dual MArch/MUD program. Before he left, Sam shared with us some of  the work he has been interested in at his time here at the CUDC. We wish him well in his next adventure!

Cut the Cord
by Sam Friesema

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In the early 1900s two enormous projects were undertaken simultaneously in Cleveland Ohio by the Van Sweringen brothers. Firstly, the garden city suburb community of Shaker Heights became one of the premier residential neighborhoods in the country. Secondly, the Cleveland Union Terminal (now Tower City) was an immense mixed-use facility. The complex’s 52 story Terminal Tower became a monumental symbol of the city’s successes. Standing at 771 feet tall, it was for a time the second tallest building in the world.

TC bp1 (1)Building Section through the Tower City Complex. The multiple linked buildings span several city blocks with multiple level changes and confusing wayfinding.

TC bp2 (1)Building Section through Tower City Complex with callouts.

Light Rail. Fueling and enabling these two projects was a third project critical to ensure the birth of the others. Shaker Heights was conceived first but as residential building lots initially sold slowly the developers needed a means to quickly transport their potential suburbanites, along with their wealth, to and from the heart of the city. The Van Sweringen brothers hastily assembled properties and easements which allowed the developers to install a light-rail rapid transit line from their new suburb to the city’s center at Public Square. Less iconic yet equally important, the transit project supplied the capital and populations necessary to fully construct the tower and the garden city. Interestingly, to secure a small one mile section of rail easement, the brothers bought an entire rail company with 523 miles of track spanning from Buffalo and Chicago which led to their eventual rail business holdings of over 30,000 miles of track and assets of an estimated $3 Billion.

TOWER CITY - CUT THE CORD - MAP

1902 Map of Greater Cleveland with highlighted Downtown, Shaker Heights, and the rail connections.

The rail line within Shaker Heights is a beautifully designed centerpiece along tree lined medians and half million dollar homes. However, once the rail line leaves Shaker Heights and cuts through poor sections of Cleveland en route to downtown, the line is sunken and hidden from view. The views to and from the transit line are obscured by grade changes and dense vegetation. Shaker residents are shielded from any views of the vacancy and poverty they are passing through. The transit line awkwardly slices through communities and pedestrian access is dangerously out of sight, unlike the well-planned stations within Shaker.

What if we removed the passenger light rail line connecting downtown Cleveland to Shaker Heights in order to re-evaluate regional public transportation options and to let the two communities build their own unique and separate self-identities moving forward?

Read more…

05-26-16

CHANGING VIEWS | Designing Youngstown’s Future

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The John J McDonough Museum of Art, Youngstown State University’s Center for Contemporary Art, will become a hub for exploring exciting possibilities for imagining public space in the city with you. Please join us at the Museum on June 10th for the opening reception from 6-8 PM. The exhibition will be on view through July 22nd.

CHANGING VIEWS | Designing Youngstown’s Future is a collaboration of regional universities with the citizens of Youngstown. Working with you, we are endeavoring to spark revitalization by demonstrating the potential for reuse and redesign in the area. The resulting projects will allow residents and businesses to see a future that otherwise might not be imagined. Youngstown State University’s Regional Economic Development Initiative (REDI) teamed up with students and faculty from Kent State University’s (KSU) College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) and KSU’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC). The exhibition highlights planning and design work that has taken place over the past year between economic development professionals at YSU and City of Youngstown residents along with the design expertise of KSU’s CAED and CUDC students.

CHANGING VIEWS | Designing Youngstown’s Future
June 10 – July 22, public reception, June 10, 6-8pm

John J McDonough Museum of Art
525 Wick Avenue
Youngstown, OH 44502

Hours
Tuesday – Saturday: 11 AM – 4 PM

The exhibition will also feature guest lectures from the CUDC staff.

Wednesday, June 29 | Economic Action Group Meeting | 10 – Noon
CUDC Guest Lecture 10 – 11am
Community Conversation: Ideas and Opportunities from the 2015 Youngstown Community Design Charrette
Kristen Zeiber, Urban Design and Project Manager, Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative

Thursday, July 7 | CUDC Guest Lecture 5:30 – 6:30pm
Historic Preservation and Urban Regeneration
Terry Schwarz, Director, Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative

Tuesday, July 19 | Economic Action Group Meeting | 10 – Noon
CUDC Guest Lecture 10 – 11am
Urban Design for Cold and Variable Climates
David Jurca, Associate Director, Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative

All lectures will take place in the McDonough Museum of Art Auditorium.

 

05-19-16

Save the Date | June 9 | Ernesto Jiménez & Sofía Márquez Aguiar

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Thursday, June 9th the CUDC will welcome Ernesto Jiménez and Sofía Márquez Aguiar, architects at the Fabrica de Arte Cubano (FAC) in Havana, Cuba. Ernesto and Sofia will present their architecture projects built in both Havana, Cuba and in Oporto, Portugal. Based on their experience as professional architects inside and outside Cuba, Ernesto and Sofia will share insights on potential collaboration between designers in Cleveland and Havana. The first half of the talk is titled, “Fabrica de Arte Cubano – A Never Ending Project”. They will discuss the history of the building that now serves as the headquarter of the cultural Fabrica de Arte Cubano (Cuban Art Factory) project. This path is indispensable to understand the logic of intervention from conceptualization to its ever-unfinished realization. Unfinished because the project has the idea of mutation embedded since its genesis. The mutation generated by the fusion of all the arts.

Click here to RSVP for the event. 

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FAC is an artistic project driven by the need to rescue, support and promote the work of artists from all branches of art such as film, music, dance, theater, visual arts, literature, photography, fashion, graphic design and architecture; that through their integration art / artist promote exchanges and direct approach between the public and the creator a massive scale.

The second half of the talk is titled, “Belomonte Studio, some projects”. This discussion contains part of the work done by Belomonte Studio during its ten years of existence, oriented to the development of various projects related to art, architecture and design, from a cross-sectional view; The studio was founded in 2004 by architects Ernesto Jimenez (Cuba) and Sofia Marques de Aguiar (Portugal), in the city of Porto, where they resided until 2013, then was established in Havana.

Ernesto Jiménez (La Habana, 1974)
Architect from Architecture Faculty, ISPJAE, (1996). Member of UNAIC and the Order of the Architects of Portugal (2009).
1996 – 1998> Department of Rehabilitation and Architectural Restoration of the National Center for Conservation, Restoration and Museology (CENCREM).
1999 – 2005> Company Filipe Oliveira Dias, architect.
2004> Foundation Belomonte Studio.
2007> Enterprise Vitrocsa and Jofebar.
2013> EICTV, San Antonio de los Baños. School of Cinema.
2013 – 2014> FAC, Cuban Art Factory.
Other works > Publications Grafic Design, Furniture Design and Architecture Photography.

Sofia Marques de Aguiar (Porto, 1973)
Architect> Art School of Porto (ESAP), (1998). Member of the Order of
Architects of Portugal (1998).
1993 – 2001> Atelier of architecture and urbanism, architect Manuel Marques de Aguiar.
1996 – 2005> CRUARB (urban rehabilitation of Porto as World Heritage city).
2004> Foundation of Belomonte Studio.
2013> EICTV San Antonio de los Baños, School of Cinema
2013 – 2014> FAC, Cuban Art Factory.
Other works> Painting, sculpture, illustration, jewelry, scenery and costume Design for Cinema

Visit our Eventbrite page to RSVP. 

Ernesto Jiménez and Sofía Márquez Aguiar
June 9, 2016
6-8 PM
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, 1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200, Cleveland, OH 44115

05-19-16

AIA Design Lecture Series | Bridging Cleveland – Miguel Rosales

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The CUDC will be hosting an AIA Cleveland Event, Thursday, May 26, 2016. They welcome famed bridge designer Miguel Rosales, president and principal designer of the Boston-based transportation architecture firm Rosales+Partners. Miguel is an architect that has specialized in bridge aesthetics and architecture and urban design throughout his career. He has made it his mission to bring an artistic touch to the often prosaic business of designing bridges in the United States, specializing in elegant, eye-catching bone-thin structures. Miguel will elaborate on the creative process for the four pedestrian bridges he has designed for the City of Cleveland, including the North Coast Harbor Bridge, the Wendy Park Pedestrian Bridge, the dramatic Lakefront Pedestrian Bridge connecting downtown to Lakefront and the Case Western Reserve University S-shaped connector.

TIME – Doors Open at 5:30, Lecture 6:00-7:00

LOCATION – CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44115

Drinks and hors d’oeuvres will be provided prior to the lecture courtesy of the Cleveland Urban Design Center and AIA Cleveland.

This program is approved for 1.0 HSW Learning Units

COST -

AIA Members: $5

Non-Members: $20

KSU CUDC Students: Free

For more information and to register please click here. 

04-18-16

Taotao Zou Lecture | April 22

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We can’t believe that we are down to our last speaker in our Spring Lecture Series. It seems that Spring is just starting around Cleveland. This Friday we welcome Taotao Zou, a visiting scholar at the CUDC. Her talk is titled, The Research of Public Environment Facilities System in Urban Space.

Public environment facilities and urban space are very important to our modern life. They work as our assistants in public space and provide us various services and conveniences. Urban space and public environment facilities are playing a more important role because they meet the various and growing needs of the users. It’s necessary to research these facilities and build a rating system to improve them.

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Taotao has been a visiting scholar at the  CUDC since August 2015, she holds Ph.D. of Engineering at College of Architecture and Urban Planning from TONGJI University of China. Her current position is a full-time Lecturer in College of Applied Art Design of Shanghai Second Polytechnic University since 2005, where she serves as Deputy Head of Environmental Design Department.

The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.