03-23-17

Mapping the Design Journey

by Jacinda Walker
Founder, designExplorr.com 

Design Journeys: Strategies for Increasing Diversity in Design Disciplines from Jacinda Walker on Vimeo.

The journey to a career can be met with great success or great struggle. When a traveler is prepared for the journey, they typically cover more distance and the experiences they encounter become quick stops along the way— moments of pause that, with rest and refueling, allow them to begin again. However, for a traveler who is less prepared to face the bumps, twists, and turns of the road, minor challenges become major roadblocks. Those minor challenges become permanent barricades that ultimately inhibit travel and one’s likelihood to continue on the path of success. Unfortunately, the latter path described here is all too common among young African American and Latino youth who seek a design-related career.

This line of inquiry led me to visualize what the journey to becoming a designer looks like and analyze what tools are needed to obtain a design-related career. My research work entitled, Design Journeys: Strategies for Increasing Diversity in Design Disciplines (2016) explores diversity in design disciplines and presents fifteen strategic ideas to expose African American and Latino youth to design-related careers. This solutions-based thesis introduces a map charting a design career from grade school to a seasoned professional. The “Design Journey Map” contains four color-coded passages: foundations, proficiency, workforce, and influence. The passages overlap with career competency components to cultivate soft skills together with the hard skills youth learn along the journey to a design career.

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Figure 1: The Design Journey Map in full

The Design Journey Map is a simple navigational tool that can be used as a framework to better inform students, parents, professionals and organizations which strategic ideas are needed and where to place them along the career path to increase diversity in design disciplines.

This framework is important because it shows the journey to become a designer and provides four principles of a strategic solution for closing the diversity gap in the design industry. The principles address the complex problem of a lack of diversity in design by identifying characteristics of a strategic solution needed for helping to close the diversity gap in design. They are labeled as comprehensive, collaborative, local, and scholastic. These Design Principles help to ensure long-term success for programs and initiatives whose intent is to expose African American and Latino youth to design-related careers.

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Figure 2: The four Design Principles for a strategic solution

Read more…

03-21-17

Samantha Ayotte | April 07

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On April 7, 2017, we welcome Samantha Ayotte to our Spring Lecture Series. Her talk, “My Birthright”, will present findings from her cultural exploration through Israel for her Birthright trip. There will be a discussion about how cultural, political, and religious experiences can differ and how they can provide solutions for contemporary living.

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Samantha Ayotte is a second-year dual degree (M.Arch, M.UD) candidate from Cleveland, Ohio. She holds an undergraduate degree in Architecture from Kent State University. She enjoys the opportunity to design and understand urban design challenges and solutions for cities like Cleveland through contemporary means of investigation. She believes communities and shared experiences can positively impact urban design, and her work thus far has aimed to implement those elements.

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Please join us from 12 PM - 1PMFriday, April 7th. This event is free and open to the public.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

03-21-17

Fresh Talk: Women Arts and Social Change | April 12

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In Cleveland, creative leaders are impacting lives and reshaping economies through bold public arts and urban design initiatives. Join the conversation with Marika Shioiri-Clark, Global Designer for Social Impact and Principal of SOSHL Studio; Jennifer Coleman, Architect and Senior Program Officer for the Arts at the Gund Foundation; Lillian Kuri, Strategic Innovator through Arts and Design and Vice President of the Cleveland Foundation; Terry Schwarz, Director of the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative at Kent State University and Founder of its Shrinking Cities Institute; and Ann Zoller, Local and National Advocate for Revitalizing Public Spaces and long-time Executive Director of LAND Studio. Susan Fisher Sterling, Director of the National Museum of Women in the Arts, based in Washington, DC, will moderate.

This event is FREE and open to the public, but space is extremely limited. Tickets are required for entry. RSVPs will be handled on a first-come, first-served basis until capacity is reached. Please register HERE.

Date and Time
Wed, April 12, 2017
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Location
MOCA Cleveland
11400 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH 44106

This FRESH TALK outreach event is presented by the Ohio Advisory Group of the National Museum of Women in the Arts. FRESH TALK is the signature program of the museum’s Women, Arts, and Social Change initiative. Sponsored by the Cleveland Foundation with generous in-kind support from MOCA Cleveland and Gries Financial LLC.

03-21-17

CUDC welcomes a new Office Manager!

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The CUDC would like to welcome our new Office Manager, April James.  April’s previous experience has been working in various academic and student services departments within higher education such as counseling & student affairs, business services, and adult higher education. April received her Bachelor’s degree from Illinois State University in Mass Communication. She is currently pursuing her Master’s degree in Education with a concentration in Higher Education Administration from Tiffin University.

We are excited to have April on our team and please contact her for any administrative inquiries.

03-06-17

Conner Karakul | Mar 10

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We will be switching things up a little bit this week for our Spring Lecture Series. Conner Karakul will be presenting a short film, Where Land Meets Water-An exploration of Norwegian urban shorelines and Oslo Harbor’s path from industry to access. Following the film will be a discussion on Cleveland’s cultural and physical relationship with its waterways- current status and future goals.

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Conner Karakul is a third year Master of Landscape Architecture candidate from Cleveland Heights, Ohio. He holds an undergraduate degree in Political Science with a minor in Environmental Studies from Kenyon College. As a member of KSU’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design’s inaugural MLA program cohort, Conner enjoys the opportunity to work on and understand the challenges and potential for creating healthy, strong communities in Legacy Cities. He believes landscape architecture can play a fundamental role. His work so far aims to embed ecological beauty and function into the complexities of urban areas through thoughtful design that celebrates the arts, culture, and ecology of a place.

Please join us from 12 PM - 1PM, Friday, March 10th. This event is free and open to the public.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

 

02-22-17

Your Local Library: Seeking Input!

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On Thursday, January 26th, CUDC staff kicked off the first round of public Open Houses for the third group of library branches in our CPL150 project. The CUDC has been working with the Cleveland Public Library since fall of 2014 on community engagement around its neighborhood branches.

The CPL system is comprised of 27 branches, and each has very different community needs; CPL recognizes that each branch should respond to those needs locally, rather than just system-wide. What improvements are needed? How should each branch respond to its local opportunities and characteristics? And how can each branch respond to changing technological needs to become a 21st-century resource for its community?

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The first Group 3 open house, at West Park Branch, broke participants into a series of workstations throughout the library itself. Balloons marked each station, asking questions around the branch’s building; grounds; neighborhood; and services. We gathered input on existing conditions, ideas for integrating new technology & educational tools, neighborhood assets, partnerships, and services. We also had participants fill out our online survey (which is open to any CPL user, no matter their local branch – please fill out if you’re interested!).

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Since then, we’ve also held open houses at Eastman Branch and Hough Branch, and still have two more: Union Branch (Feb 23rd, 4:30-7:00 PM) and Walz Branch (March 7th, 4:00-7:00 PM).

After this round of open houses, we’ll input our feedback and start generating initial design alternatives for each branch, which we’ll present to the communities in a second round of public sessions, in May of this year, in preparation for final recommendations & report, which will be released in June 2017.

Please check out the project website for updates. We hope to see you at your local branch!

02-21-17

Jonathan Hanna | Mar 03

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On Friday, March 3rd, from 12-1 PM, we welcome Jonathan Hanna to our Spring Lecture Series. Jonathan Hanna is the Post Graduate Fellow at the CUDC. He earned his B.S. Architecture and Master of Urban Design from the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Michigan. He has worked at various design firms in and around the Detroit area.

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Prior to coming to the CUDC Jonny worked for A(n) Office on the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale for the U.S. Pavilion. Jonny’s talk, “Unitary Urbanism: Co-Optive Streets and Situations”, will be discussing his fellowship project “Forget Me Not” and his past work leading up to the fellowship, as framed by the Unitary Urbanism movement of the 1950’s and 60’s. Central to the theme of the talk is the latent potential of streets and situation for the leveraging of socio-political power.

Please join us from 12 PM - 1Pm, Friday, March 3rd. This event is free and open to the public.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

 

 

02-20-17

Students from Cleveland Compete in National ULI Competition

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This past month, graduate students from Kent State University, Cleveland State University, and Case Western Reserve University collaborated to partake in the ULI Gerald D. Hines Urban Design Competition. The competition asked students from design, planning, and finance backgrounds to join forces and produce a feasible real estate pro forma and design concept for a site on Chicago’s north side. The 25-acre site, situated along the Chicago River is part of a planned manufacturing district, while also seeing development pressure for housing and tech development. Students worked to produce schemes that included flex industrial space, university partnerships, transit-oriented development, affordable housing, and other development proposals. Teams also connected to Chicago’s new multi-use trail, the 606, crossing the river to create regional connections.

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Students worked in teams of five at the CUDC throughout the two-week process. Professionals from the local community including architects, planners, developers, and bankers all participated as advisors and critics throughout the process. Evening feedback sessions had students present their work to these audiences to gauge feasibility and clarity in their concepts. The local Cleveland ULI chapter helps sponsor the event each year. Four teams in total participated this year from five six different disciplinary backgrounds. Teams from the Cleveland cohort then submitted their proposals to compete in the national competition. Results from the national competition will be released later this month.

02-16-17

Chris Maurer | Feb 24

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Friday, February 24, 2017, at noon, we will welcome Chris Maurer to our Spring Lecture Series. Chris Maurer, principal of redhouse studio, will be talking about his projects in the developing world, the design / REbuild project* in Cleveland, and how working in limited resource environments can shape innovation.

Chris has worked as an architect in New York City, Anchorage, Florence, Kigali, and Lilongwe. In New York, Chris was director at studioMDA under Markus Dochantschi protégé to Pritzker Prize-winning architect Zaha Hadid. In Africa, Chris served as director for studioMDA and MASS Design Group and designed and built many humanitarian projects for such clients as Madonna, Partners in Health, the UN Millennium Village Project, the Clinton Global Initiative, and Malaika.

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Chris founded redhouse studio in 2013 in Cleveland, Ohio. redhouse engages in all facets of architecture including research and innovation in low impact material technologies, design, fabrication, and humanitarian work spanning the globe. He teaches from time to time at Kent State University advocating for students to get involved with humanitarian causes and innovate for brighter futures.

*The CUDC has compiled a booked of photographer Helen Liggett’s images from the design / REbuild house. We will be previewing the book at Chris’s talk. 

Please join us from 12 PM – 1Pm, Friday, February 24th. This event is free and open to the public.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

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01-30-17

Mabel O. Wilson | Feb 09

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On Thursday, February 9th, we welcome Mabel O. Wilson to our Spring Lecture Series. Mabel’s talk, “Building Racial States”, will address race and nation-state formation and its implication in current social movements.

Mabel O. Wilson is a Professor of Architecture at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation where she co-directs the Global Africa Lab and appointed as a Research Fellow at the Institute for Research in African-American Studies. She has authored Begin with the Past: Building the National Museum of African American History and Culture (2016) and Negro Building: African Americans in the World of Fairs and Museums (2012). Exhibitions of her work have been featured at the Art Institute of Chicago, Istanbul Design Biennale, Wexner Center for the Arts, and the Smithsonian’s Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum’s Triennial. She is a founding member of Who Builds Your Architecture?—an advocacy project to educate the architectural profession about the problems of globalization and labor.

Mabel will also be speaking at the College of Architecture & Environmental Design at the Cene Lecture Hall at 5:30 PM, in Kent, OH. Her evening lecture is titled, “Notes on the Virginia Statehouse: Slavery, Race, and Jefferson’s America”.

This event is free and open to the public. RSVP isn’t required, but it is requested. Please RSVP HERE.

Thursday, February 9, 2017
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

01-05-17

We’re Hiring a Part-Time Office Manager

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The College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) at Kent State University is seeking applicants for a part-time Administrative Clerk/Office Manager at our downtown Cleveland facility.  This position will provide part-time administrative, budget, and clerical support to the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, located in downtown Cleveland. The office manager will maintain all budget documents for projects and the facility; schedule meetings; make sure CUDC is open for business; greet visitors; grant front door entries; assist with student concerns.

Bookkeeping knowledge is required.

Position is Part-Time, 20 hours per week.

Monday through Friday, 8:30 am – 12:30 pm preferred.

Submit all required materials as an on-line application to KSU Human Resources.

To complete the process, go to: https://jobs.kent.edu/ (Position#998181)

Kent State University is an Equal Opportunity Employer

12-08-16

Advocating for Diversity: A Conversation with Michelle Barrett of NOMAS

michele crawford cropMichele Crawford presents her architectural research at the 2014 Design Diversity Powered by PechaKucha event in Cleveland, Ohio

Michele Crawford from Architecture firm Robert P. Madison International speaks with Michelle Barrett, the new president of the National Organization of Minority Architects Student Chapter (NOMAS) at Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design

by Michele Crawford

My inspiration to become an architect emerged from my educational journey. I did not have many architectural influences prior to my start on the path to architecture. My career goal was to become a car designer. I translated this ambition to the creation of interior environments and ultimately completed both a Bachelor of Science degree in Interior Architecture and Master of Architecture from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. The study of architecture in Chicago proved to be an amazing experience. My studio space was on the top floor of The Sullivan Center, formerly the Carson Pirie Scott Building, and I could easily visit historical examples of designs from Frank Lloyd Wright, Renzo Piano, Mies Van Der Rohe, Stanley Tigerman, and others. Using the city as my classroom provided enduring inspiration.

I noticed, however, the lack of admiration of both women and architects of color in the Chicago scene and worldwide. When my professors suggested architects to use as inspiration, they were rarely African American, and never African American women. It was through my own investigations that I found images of architects similar to myself and my culture. Gradually, Paul Revere Williams became my Mies. Norma Merrick Sklarek became my F.L. Wright. Dina Griffith became my Renzo. Sharon Sutton could eloquently express my angst—preparing me for the suppression of the African American voice and visibility in the profession.

In my current position as Project Designer at Robert P. Madison International, I am surrounded by a rich history of architectural contributions from an African American owned firm, currently led by Sandra Madison. I make special attempts to show my face to those who are considering pursuing a design career, and try to persuade those with interest.

Currently, the United States has under 400 licensed African American women architects, making up just under .4% of the greater architect population. We have a desperate need for more representation. The diversity rates nationally in architecture are not keeping up with the changing communities that the profession is called upon to serve. African Americans comprise 13.9% of Ohio’s population. Strikingly, Ohio has 2,650 licensed architects, but only 63 are African American—that’s only 2% of the profession. This disparity has been evident since the inception of the profession. In 2015, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) initiated a deeper conversation about this matter. The AIA surveyed its members and supporters about the perception of diversity and also examined the relationship of diversity to success in the field. Its closing analysis suggested changes in hopes of creating greater equality and more balanced numbers. Communities and demographics are steadily changing, yet, the demographics of the designers of these same spaces are not keeping pace.

As the new president of the National Organization of Minority Architects Student Chapter (NOMAS) at Kent State University, Michelle Barrett is working towards creating and sustaining a space of support for students of color in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED). We recently discussed her ambitions to move past potential and into action in the architecture world’s quickly approaching future. Though the Kent State diversity numbers in the architecture and design programs seem to align with the national averages, the opportunity for a NOMAS chapter to spark a change is hopeful. The current minority students, and specifically Michelle, seem to recognize the importance of support for students of color at Kent State and are working towards change.

Michelle and I had the following conversation about her experience leading the NOMAS Chapter and her plans for the future.

Design Awards Michele and MichelleLeft to Right: Terrance Pitts (Turner Construction), Michelle Barrett, Michele Crawford, Teresa Giralt (Turner Construction), Amir Allenbey at the AIA Cleveland Design Awards

 

Michelle Barrett
Hometown: Gaithersburg, MD
Class / Year: Class of 2017, 4th year
Major: Architecture

 

MC: How did you hear about Kent State?

MB: As many black youth, I thought my future was in sports. I played soccer all of my life up until I tore my ACL during my senior year. Kent State was on my list of schools (for soccer) because my coach had past connections. After it was clear that I wouldn’t be playing sports in college, I had to approach that list of schools differently. Which one would provide the best academic value? Kent State was the answer.

 

MC: What inspired you to pursue the architecture path?

MB: I have always been drawn to art and design. Probably because of my mother; she is a graphic designer. But I never really wanted to be an artist. I wanted to have an impact on people’s everyday lives, to help people. I didn’t know how or what career would allow me to do that. At an away soccer tournament in Miami, a player’s mother took us on a tour of Downtown Miami. She gave us a history lesson on all the Art Deco inspired architecture and the type of events that happened there. I fell in love. At that point I realized how I could be creative, yet impactful, in society.

 

MC: Why NOMAS? Why now? 

MB: I did not previously know about NOMA/NOMAS until CAED Associate Dean Bill Willoughby initiated discussions on the topic. He was and continues to be an integral part of NOMAS here at Kent. After the initial informational presentations he gave students, a group of us students took the lead in formalizing the organization. The other students involved included: Torri Appling, Shelton Finch, and Zai Abdi. I personally took ownership of the process because I thought it was important to have an organization devoted to minority issues (diversity, inclusion, fellowship, etc) in relation to architecture. It’s a unique niche that cannot be fully realized in groups such as Black United Students (BUS).

 

MC: Have you ever felt as if you were treated unfairly because of your gender or race?

MB: On many occasions, people are surprised to hear about my academic achievements—be it my choice of major or my honors standing. After many years, their surprise no longer catches me off guard. However, I still feel an injustice when said individuals expect you to be 10x better than your peers. They hold you to different standards and it is unfair.

 

MC: What has been you favorite studio project?

MB: My favorite studio project was in Third Year Studio—The Media Center Library—a part of the Cleveland International School masterplan. It was the first time we interacted with real clients—the community, the students.

 

MC: As president what are the main goals that you have for the organization?

MB: My main goals for the organization include career development (educational and professional), community engagement in the Greater Cleveland area, and to ensure that the NOMAS voice continues to be heard as a legacy organization in the future CAED community.

 

***

Historically, the voice of the African American architect has been suppressed. However, as our world continues to change, the profession seems to be committed to making the field a more inclusive and welcoming place for all. Organizations like Design Diversity are working to push accountability in this matter. Design Diversity, an advisory committee which grew out of Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC), is committed to educating, connecting, and celebrating diversity in the design professions. Specifically focusing on African American and Latino communities, this group has specific goals of awareness to the larger design community with hopes of encouraging authentic, diverse views and considerations within and throughout the design process. Ultimately, Design Diversity and NOMA/NOMAS are promoting the importance of varied voices in educational and professional design communities.

 

Michele Crawford, Assoc. AIA, is a Project Designer at Robert P. Madison International, based in Cleveland, Ohio. Michele serves on a number of service organizations, including the Design Diversity Advisory Committee. In 2016, Michele was recognized with the Activism Award by AIA Cleveland. Follow Michele on Twitter @initiat_ed.

 

 

References:

NCARB By the Numbers 2015
http://www.ncarb.org/About-NCARB/NCARB-by-the-Numbers/~/media/Files/PDF/Special-Paper/2015NCARBbytheNumbers.ashx

African American Architects Directory
http://blackarch.uc.edu/

Diversity in the Profession of Architecture
http://www.aia.org/aiaucmp/groups/aia/documents/pdf/aiab108092.pdf

African Americans in Ohio
https://development.ohio.gov/files/research/P7003.pdf

 

12-08-16

Helen Liggett’s MOOS photographs on display now through Jan 2 at The Dealership

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Helen Liggett’s documentation of the Summer 2016 activities of students and planners participating in Making Our Own Space at Britt Oval in the Buckeye neighborhood and in the Moreland neighborhood in Shaker will be on display at The Dealership, 3558 Lee Road in Shaker Heights, Monday-Friday, 9AM-5PM, until January 2nd.

The exhibit follows middle school and high school students as they transform ideas about improving their neighborhoods into physical structures.

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The images are arranged in sequences that “tell a story” about particular activities or projects. The Buckeye sequences tend to be about MOOS skills in general. The Moreland sequences tend to be about designing and executing special projects, reflecting the greater maturity of this group. Viewers are encouraged to see the spatial or ordination and communication that building requires. In the end, the art of building play structures is remarkably like the art of building community.

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Helen Liggett’s interests are in the related fields of urban theory, visual culture, and photography. She teaches at the Urban College at Cleveland State University and at the ARCH Studies program at Kent State University.

The Dealership
3558 Lee Road
Shaker Heights, OH
44120

Exhibit Times
Monday – Friday
9AM – 5PM
through January 2, 2017

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11-29-16

Halina Steiner & Forbes Lipschitz | Dec 02

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This Friday, December 2, 2016, we welcome Halina Steiner & Forbes Lipschitz to the CUDC for our last lunch lecture of our Fall Series. Their talk, “Memorials for the Future Competition: American Wild”, will discuss how The National Parks are a living memorial to a uniquely American idea of wilderness. In celebration of the National Parks Centennial, American Wild brings the National Park experience to the Nation’s capital by projection mapping high-definition video of 59 parks onto the L’Enfant Plaza Station over 59 days.

Forbes Lipschitz is an Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at the Austin E. Knowlton School of Architecture at The Ohio State University. She teaches both studio and seminar courses in landscape planning, geographic information systems, and representation. As a faculty affiliate with the Initiative for Food and Agricultural Transformation, her current research explores the role of geospatial analysis and representation in rethinking North American agricultural territories. She has been awarded teaching and research grants from the LSU Office of Research and Development, the Coastal Sustainability Studio, and the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in Fine Arts. Her professional experience in landscape architecture has spanned a range of public, private, and infrastructural work, including a multi-year installation at Les Jardins de Metis. She received her Master in Landscape Architecture from the Harvard Graduate School of Design and a BA in environmental aesthetics from Pomona College in Claremont, California.

Halina Steiner is an Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at the Austin E. Knowlton School of Architecture at The Ohio State University. Her current research focuses on the visualization of transboundary hydrologic and infrastructure systems. Prior to her appointment at OSU, Steiner served as the Design Director for DLANDstudio Architecture + Landscape Architecture where she was the project manager for master planning, green infrastructure, temporary installations, and public design projects. This work included Paths to Pier 42, a three-year pop-up park to activate underused waterfront space impacted by Superstorm Sandy, Public Media Commons, The QueensWay Plan, and HOLD System. She received a Master in Landscape Architecture from the City College of New York and a Bachelor of Science in Design in Visual Communication Design from Arizona State University.

Join us, Friday, December 2nd, from 12 -1 PM. As always, this lecture is free and open to the public.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

 



11-22-16

CUDC students win AIA Design Awards!

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This past Friday, the Cleveland chapters of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and International Interior Design Association (IIDA) hosted the 2016 Design Awards. The annual event honors work by local professionals as well as students. This year, CUDC students Caitlyn Scoville and Ziyan Ye received awards for their work in the 2016 summer studio; Home Economics: A State of Housing in Cleveland. Scoville was awarded the Honor Award—the highest award possible for her project “Lead Exposed,” while Ye received an Honorable Mention for his project “The Distributed Center.”

Caitlyn Scoville project Lead ExposedClick image to view full project. 

Scoville’s winning project examined housing demolition and redevelopment through a decision-making framework in relation to levels of lead contamination and environmental hazards in Cleveland’s neighborhoods. Her scheme addresses areas of lead concentration within the postindustrial landscape using a series of scales (regional, city, community, and individual) in order to alter the fabric over time. Scoville says of her work in the summer studio, “The studio allowed us to explore different scales of interventions, from the intimate to the city at large, and I think my passion for designing across these multiple scales was articulated in my final project”.

Ziyan Ye project The Distributed CenterClick image to view full project. 

Ye’s project examined new housing options near the proposed expansion of the Nord Family Greenway near University Circle and the Hough neighborhood to better integrate world class institutions and existing neighborhood needs. A variety of housing types and public spaces meet demands for high quality and affordable housing options across the economic spectrum. The proposed expanded greenway contextually weaves together multiple contexts, allowing for the development of multiple neighborhood anchors that tie in to a larger network.