02-08-16

Felipe Correa Lecture | February 11

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This week we will be holding our Spring Lecture Series on Thursday, February 11th, at 12:15 PM, here at the CUDC. We welcome architect, urbanist, and Harvard Associate Professor, Felipe Correa. Felipe’s talk, “Urbanism Primer: Approaches to City Design in the 21st Century”, will provide an overview of the most salient modes of practice currently being applied to the contemporary city. By presenting a series of projects that range in scale and ambition, the lecture showcases the rich instrumental diversity afforded by design and its ability to confront diverse urban scenarios.

correa__mex_strategiesProject Constellation for Mexico City. From Mexico City: Between Geometry and Geography. Courtesy of Felipe Correa

Felipe Correa is Associate Professor in the Department of Urban Planning and Design and Director of the Urban Design Degree Program at Harvard University. A New York-based architect and urbanist, Correa works at the confluence of Architecture, Urbanism and Infrastructure. Through his design practice, Somatic Collaborative, he has developed design projects and consultancies with the public and private sector in multiple cities and regions across the globe, including Mexico City, New Orleans, Quito, Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Seoul among many others.

If you can’t make it to our afternoon lecture, Felipe will be also speaking at the Kent State University Main Campus, Kiva Auditorium at 6:00 PM, Thursday, February 11th. His lecture is titled, “Elective Affinities: Architecture Across Scales”. Both are free and open to the public.

 

02-02-16

Casey Poe | February 5

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Join us this Friday, February 5th, at noon for our Spring Lecture Series. We will be welcoming MArch + MUD student, Casey Poe, for an interesting talk from the student perspective. She will be talking about her experiences as a student in Florence, Italy during the Fall 2015 semester. She will be sharing her travels, living in Florence and the ways in which she grew to understand the city within multiple contextual scales: from the larger European scale (in conjunction with her field study trips) down to the scale of her individual experience in finding a home in Florence.

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Casey Poe is in her first year of the Masters of Architecture and Urban Design dual degree program. She grew up east of Cleveland, but completed my Bachelor of Arts in Architecture from Ball State University in Indiana. The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.

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01-27-16

Call for Ideas: COLDSCAPES//Adapt

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Registration is now open!

COLDSCAPES//Adapt seeks submissions that respond to challenges posed by volatile weather conditions in winter cities.

 
Entrants should provide an effective visual (and potentially aural, if using video) presentation of a built project or conceptual proposal that responds to the following design concerns:

  • How can the built environment quickly respond to changing weather conditions?
  • What design strategies can enable more adaptable buildings, public spaces, and urban infrastructure?
  • How can cities embrace and express indeterminacy, while maintaining a high quality of life for its residents?
  • What insights from winter cities can be applied to the challenges of increased variability and volatility caused by global climate change?
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    red square2013 COLDSCAPES Competition winning entry Second Hinterlands, Noel Turgeon and Natalya Egon

    This year’s call for entries builds on the previous COLDSCAPES Competition, which brought significant attention to three winning projects and ten honorable mentions. Propelled by the competition, one of the winners, The Freezeway by Matt Gibbs, recently opened as a pilot project in Edmonton, Canada.

    edmonton freezewayPhoto of the built Edmonton Freezeway pilot project, a 2013 COLDSCAPES competition winner. (photo credit: Heather Dailey)

    Three winning entries will be selected by the jury to receive awards:

  • $500 First Place
  • $300 Second Place
  • $200 Third Place
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    Learn more and register for the competition at Coldscapes.org.

    The registration fee is $10 per team. Registration ends on February 12, 2016 and the submission deadline is Friday, February 19th at 6pm EST.

    2_fullpagePOLAR 77 by Wendy Wang and Ryan Ort, selected as one of three winning projects in the 2013 COLDSCAPES Competition 

    Competition winners will be announced at Brite Winter in Cleveland on February 20th. The announcement will take place following a public talk by COLDSCAPES//Adapt juror Sergio Lopez-Pineiro. The talk is free and open to the public, beginning at 3pm. Learn more about the event and RSVP here.

    The COLDSCAPES competition and public event are organized by Kent State University’s Center for Outdoor Living Design (COLD) in partnership with Brite Winter, with generous support from Ohio Arts Council.

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    01-21-16

    2016 Spring Lecture Series kicks off with Rick Espe of MKSK

    Spring Lecture Poster_template Join us Friday, January 29th, for our first lecture of the spring semester. We welcome Rick Espe, Principal at MKSK as he will discuss “Transforming the Columbus Riverfront”. This will trace MKSK’s work on the Columbus Riverfront over the past 25-years. From the Riverfront Vision Plan, through specific projects – North Bank Park, Scioto Audubon Metro Park, Scioto Mile, and the recently opened Scioto-Olentangy Greenways. rick_espe Rick brings a career-long commitment to improving the quality of the built environment while minimizing the impact on the natural environment. Through each project he strives to find the appropriate balance within the interconnectedness of environmental, economic, and social sustainability and implementing sustainable design practices as a value-added proposition. His expertise in the management and design of complex national and international projects and design abilities demonstrate his experience in developing the built environment. Several of his projects have been recognized by the American Society of Landscape Architects awards programs from campus master plans to healthcare facilities to award-winning urban parks. View the full list of speakers here. The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.

    01-03-16

    Sergio Lopez-Pineiro Lecture | Feb 20

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    Please join us at the Brite Winter Fest for an engaging talk from Harvard’s Sergio Lopez-Pineiro entitled, “Three Models of Public Space: Adventure Playgrounds, Whiteswards, and Speakers’ Corners.” Lopez-Pineiro’s lecture will be followed by an announcement of the winners of this year’s COLDSCAPES Design Competition.

    Saturday, February 20th
    3 – 4:30pm
    Brite Winter Festival
    Music Box Supper Club | Lower Level
    1148 Main Avenue
    Flats West Bank, Cleveland, OH


    Click here to RSVP


    Architect Sergio Lopez-Pineiro’s presentation will focus on the imagination and protection of truly open (indeterminate) public space. His research offers insights on how cities can embrace uncertainty, with particular applications for variable winter weather conditions. According to Lopez-Pineiro, cities do not require more specifically defined and controlled public space—despite current political discourses ignited by fear. Rather, we need to think of public space as a source of diversity and relatedness. In order to do this, future cities need to go beyond traditional models of public space. Voids are an opportunity for this alternative type of public space. Programmatic and seasonal temporality is an essential factor in the creation and protection of this openness and indeterminacy.

    Lopez-PineiroSnowscape1Image: Sergio Lopez-Pineiro’s project, Olmsted’s Blank Snow, received an Honorable Mention in the 2013 Coldscapes Design Competition

    As part of the CUDC’s Future City Sessions, the talk will explore an emerging idea in citymaking and is intended to provoke discussion about applications for Northeast Ohio. Lopez-Pineiro’s talk will lay out specific spatial qualities and how these can ignite an alternative type of public space. The value of indeterminacy will be illustrated by a range of projects, including his whitesward landscape project Olmsted’s Blank Snow.

    Sergio Lopez-Pineiro designs and writes about gaps found in everyday spaces, appearing due to mismatched relationships between social structures and spatial organizations. He is the founder of design practice Holes of Matter and 2014-15 Daniel Urban Kiley Fellow in Landscape Architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. He has taught widely, primarily at the University at Buffalo, where he was the 2006-07 Reyner Banham Fellow. His work has been supported by several institutions such as the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA) and The MacDowell Colony, and has been published and featured in MAS Context, Bracket, arq: Architecture Research Quarterly, Places, 2G, and the Boston Globe, amongst others.

    fieldsImage: Studies of continuous, homogeneous, and non-hierarchical Spatial Fields by Holes of Matter

    Lopez-Pineiro graduated from ETSAM (Escuela Técnica Superior de Arquitectura de Madrid) in 1998 and received his M.Arch. degree from Princeton University in 2004, where he was awarded the Suzanne Kolarik Underwood Prize. A registered architect in Spain, Lopez-Pineiro has worked at No.mad (Madrid, 1998-2000) and at Foreign Office Architects (London, 2000-2002).

    This Future City Session is made possible by the generous support of the George Gund Foundation. The lecture is also part of this year’s Center for Outdoor Living Design (COLD) program, supported by the Ohio Arts Council and Brite Winter.

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    12-21-15

    Point of View: Architecture + Migration

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    Associate Professor, Steve Rugare, will be speaking at Museum of Contemporary Art on January 7th, 2015. Departing from the work of Do Ho Suh, Steve’s talk will look at  how immigrant communities have adapted to the built environment in Cleveland and beyond.

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    Steve Rugare has been a full-time Associate Professor at Kent State University’s College of Architecture & Environmental Design (CAED) since 2009. In addition to teaching introductory courses in architectural history, he teaches urban history and theory at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) and the upper division courses in architectural history and theory. He has also coordinated the Master of Urban Design capstone project at the CUDC. Before 2009, Steve was a full-time member of the CUDC professional staff, managing competitions, coordinating events, and doing editing and graphic design. With Terry Schwarz, he edited the first two volumes of the CUDC’s Urban Infill journal. He has advised the Cleveland Design Competition since its inception.

    Steve Rugare’s primary research focus is modernism in the communicative and planning context of world’s expositions. This work–drawing on a wide interdisciplinary background in political theory, philosophy, art history, cultural studies, and intellectual history—has resulted in several articles and conference presentations, and a book is in the works.

    DATE:
    January 7, 2016
    7:00 PM

    LOCATION:
    Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland (MOCA)
    11400 Euclid Avenue
    Cleveland, OH 44106

    TICKETS:
    Free with museum admission

    12-08-15

    Nicholas Rajkovich Lecture | December 11

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    For our final speaker in our Fall Lecture Series we welcome Nicholas Rajkovich. His talk, Designing the Resilient City, will discuss the concept of resilience as it relates to cities, the expected impacts of climate change in Cleveland, and how our design processes need to go beyond just an examination of the physical environment to include issues like social cohesion.

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    Nicholas B. Rajkovich, PhD, AIA is an Assistant Professor at the University at Buffalo. His research investigates the intersection of energy efficiency, renewable energy, and adaptation to climate change. Prior to earning a PhD in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Michigan, he was a Senior Program Engineer at the Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) Company Customer Energy Efficiency Department. At PG&E, he was responsible for coordinating a new Zero Net Energy Pilot Program. He was also chair of the San Francisco American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on the Environment.

    The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.

    11-30-15

    Jennifer Mapes Lecture | December 4

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    There are only a couple of lectures left in our Fall Series. Join us Friday, December 4th, as Jennifer Mapes will be discussing Lessons for Sustainability from Small Towns.

    Jennifer Mapes, Assistant Professor of Geography, arrived in Kent in Fall 2012, having previously taught at Plattsburgh State in New York State and University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

    Jen’s dissertation examined the effects of global contemporary change in small towns, connecting theoretical understandings of place and space to on-the-ground outcomes. She spent nine months in seven towns in the American West, interviewing local residents and key decision-makers to learn how their towns experience and react to socio-economic and environmental change.

    Her primary research and teaching interest is connecting global and national change to local outcomes, with a focus on urban sustainability in small cities. Living in downtown Kent, Jen continues her work on small towns by studying causes and effects of the city’s recent downtown redevelopment.

    As a community geographer and internship coordinator, Jen works to connect students to local projects and non-profits. Last year, she taught a new course, “Online Mapping for Community Outreach” in which students created interactive maps to serve local groups.

    The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.

    11-16-15

    ULI Competition Strategy Session | November 20

    This Friday, November 20, from 12-1 pm the CUDC lunch lecture will feature strategies for the Urban Land Institute’s 2016 Urban Design Competition. Past participants recognized in the competition will be presenting their work and share their insights for competing in this noted international competition. Interested students for the 2016 competition should consider attending either the lunch lecture, or the ULI Team Formation session, also on Friday, from 5:00-6:30 pm.

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    In past years, graduate students from the CUDC, Case Western Reserve University, and Cleveland State University have collaborated together to win four honorable mentions. More information on the competition can be found here.

    The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.

     

    11-05-15

    Bill Willoughby Lecture | November 6th

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    This week as part of our Fall Lecture Series we welcome Bill Willoughby, Associate Dean and Associate Professor at Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design. His talk is titled, Changing Places: Affect, Activism, and Urban Refitting. Here is an excerpt from Bill about his talk:

    “Every day, events affect the city and its citizens. This preceding statement points to the simple potential in all urban places to yield and affect changes upon people and things. The items in a citizen’s pockets or handbag form a geography of occasions, force, and exchanges than have small but precipitous influences throughout the city. Starting with the contents in my pocket, I can derive an affect theory for urban place. From these pocketed forms of identity, access, networks, and instruments of purchase power, transit, political and social affiliation, I envision a theory of affects in which the places where we encounter other people and things are subtly refitted through our actions—and the affect places make on us. This lecture looks at ways artists, architects, and urbanists refit places through art, activism, and other derivations of affect.”

    Bill Willoughby is an architect, educator, and essayist. After graduating from Kent State University and beginning his architectural career in Cleveland, he served as an assistant professor at University of North Carolina at Charlotte and later became an educator and administrator at Louisiana Tech University where he served for 15 years. In 2013, he boomeranged back to Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design to serve as Associate Dean and Associate Professor. He founded the Community Design Activism Center (CDAC) at Louisiana Tech University and has published on architecture and urbanism from a cultural studies perspective since 1993.

    Join us from 12-1 PM at the CUDC. As always, free and open to the public.

    CUDC
    1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
    Cleveland, OH 44115

     

    10-29-15

    Commuting the Crooked River; Making a Present out of History

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    by Dax Roman Godkin

    Morning. The river glistens with sunlight and possibilities. I paddle my kayak around a bend. A magnificent great blue heron rises from its quiet hunt in front of me in the river. I have disturbed its potential breakfast and it will have to seek different hunting grounds. The extended spread of the heron’s wings carries it into the horizon, two skinny little legs dangling along like an afterthought.

    I am on the Second Annual Crooked River Commute down the Cuyahoga River. Organized by David Jurca, Associate Director of Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collective (CUDC), this trip begins at Kent State’s main campus and ends near the CUDC in Cleveland. More precisely, the trip ends at the river’s egress into Lake Erie at the U.S. Coast Guard station at Whiskey Island, site of the Great Lakes Brewing Company’s Burning River Festival. Many of us brought our own equipment, but there was a generous contribution of boats and gear from Mark Pecot from 41 North Coastal Kayak Adventures. Additional gear was rented from Dan Hudak of River Cruiser Kayaking.

    The purpose of this event is to “promote the river as a shared regional asset for education, recreation, and sustainability.” Our intention, besides just enjoying the river, is to look for areas of improvement along the 50-mile stretch of river between Kent and Lake Erie.

    The Cuyahoga River has the dubious reputation of catching on fire in the late 1960’s. This was not an isolated event. River fires were not uncommon in those days, but this particular fire became the catalyst for the creation of both the Clean Water Act and the Environmental Protection Agency. Vast improvements in water quality on the river have come about from the interventions of these governmental agencies. There are over forty species of fish that call the Cuyahoga River home, many of which live only in clean waters.

    The group met for the first time at Waterworks Park in Kent. Most of us were strangers with David being the primary connection between us. I knew David because we had lived in the same neighborhood for a time. When I heard about last year’s trip, I made sure that I got myself included in this year’s adventure by consistently pestering him for months.
    Another member of the crew, David Brandt, a Cleveland Heights native and graduate of Kent State who now resides in the Washington DC area, read about the trip in an alumni newsletter and similarly pestered David to be included. Sometimes it pays to be perseverant.

    There was one return member from last year’s trip, Chris Maurer, a freelance architect and instructor at Kent State, who would act as our primary scout and guide.

    We all said our hellos and had a little breakfast, then hit the water for the morning.

    The weather could not have been nicer, seventy-five degrees, slightly overcast, with an occasional breeze to keep it cool.

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    The water through Kent was placid and serene. However, as we expected, the water levels of the river were a little low. High-centered on the bedrock and gravel riverbed several times, we scooted our way into deeper water or just got out of the boats and walked around the longer shallows. This did not take away from the beauty of the morning as we wound around the bends in this truly crooked river, talking and laughing, getting to know one another without the usual filters.

    Conversations were often interrupted with the necessity to pay attention as we maneuvered through the obstacles and occasional obstructions in the river. We all watched and learned from each other, sometimes following in a member’s path as they had obviously chosen a good line through the potential stickiness, others going a different way as they got stuck in their path; the low water levels adding spice to the complex decision making processes.

    We stopped for lunch and a necessary portage of the Sheraton Falls in Cuyahoga Falls. These falls are impassible for all but the most experienced paddlers.

    Charles Frederick of the CUDC was in charge of the truck for this portion of the trip. Charles, a member of last year’s Commute, was quite disappointed that a shoulder injury kept him out of this year’s trip. However, his and others efforts as the support crew were invaluable assets to the trip.

    A good portion of us rode with the gear in the back of the truck. We felt we were on a secret spy mission during the dark, jostley ride to the next put-in below the falls.

    The next section of the trip took us past Akron and into the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Read more…

    10-12-15

    Mark Linder Lecture & Exhibition | October 19-23

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    We welcome Mark Linder as he presents a special gallery exhibition and talk titled, American City 2.5. The exhibition will be on display October 19-21, 9 am – 5 pm and October 22-23, 9 am – 12 pm. Mark will give a talk about the installation on October 21 at 12 pm. Both the exhibition and the gallery talk will be held at the CUDC. Following Mark’s gallery talk at the CUDC, he will be speaking at Kent State University’s Schwartz Center 177 at 6:30 pm.

    Exhibition: On display October 19-21, 9 am – 5 pm and October 22-23, 9 am – 12 pm
    Gallery Talk: October  21 @ 12:00 noon, CUDC
    “American City 2.5”
    American City 2.5 explores the imaging capacities of geographic information systems (GIS) as a mode of urban design. It is the most recent in a series of GIS projects that began in 2001 as transdisciplinary research on the differing capabilities, spatial logics, and disciplinary bases of GIS and CAD software. This project exploits the geo-processing and graphic capacities of GIS to transform the discrete categories and boundaries of census and municipal data into pliable, even plastic, relational images that can suggest new spatial networks, gaps, intensities, densities, and affiliations. We propose a hybridized, cross-programmed, and more efficient public services network that combines the scales, infrastructures, operations, programs, and constituencies of four underfunded, atrophying public institutions -schools, libraries, post offices, and bus transit- in the context of hydrology and economy. Our imaging techniques aspire to manifest dissensual and differential space in which “the people” does not consist of individual data points in a census of the population, and citizens are not units of demographic categorization or subjects in a policed domain of information. Rather, the people are reformulated as relative, unstable, and latent communities in an improper spatial mapping of an amalgamated, networked public institution.

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    Kent State University Lecture: Wednesday, October 21 @ 6:30 PM, Schwartz Center 177 
    “The New Brutal: Images, Mies and the Smithsons”
    What might architectural practice become if its primary means and ends were images? Imaging is a field of inquiry and possibility with fundamental challenges for architecture today. It is also a field with a history in architecture, and a clear beginning in the work and ideas of the New Brutalist architects affiliated with the Independent Group of 1950s Britain, most famously theorized by Reyner Banham as topological “image-making.” The New Brutal is increasingly pertinent in today’s world of dense, instantaneous, superficial actualities which are as prevalent, and as necessary to grapple with, in architecture’s production, reception and dissemination as in any other field.

    Mark Linder is a Professor of Architecture at Syracuse University, where he has chaired the graduate programs, coordinated the New York City program, and served as Chancellor’s Fellow in the Humanities. His research pursues design theory and history considered in a transdisciplinary framework and is focused on modern architecture since 1950. He is the author of Nothing Less than Literal: Architecture after Minimalism (MIT 2004) and is currently at work on a book titled That’s Brutal, What’s Modern? on the alternative mid-century modernisms, or Miesianisms, of Alison and Peter Smithson, Walter Segal, John Hejduk, and others. He has taught as a visiting professor at the University of Michigan, Harvard, University of Illinois-Chicago, Rice University, IIT, RISD, and UCLA.

    His most recent work explores the potential of image studies for architecture. As Chancellor’s Fellow in the Humanities (2011-14) he taught a seminar and organized an event series, titled IMAGES?Precisely!, which focused on the ways that the precise analysis, application, and understanding of images invite innovative research methods and collaborations, and promise to shuffle the presumed territories, limits, affiliations, and purposes of academic fields. A website, imagesproject.org documents the results of that work.

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    10-08-15

    Havana: the future never happened by itself…

     

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    On October 7th, the CUDC hosted a lecture by the influential Cuban architect and urban planner, Miguel Coyula. Professor Coyula is on the faculty at the University of Havana. In his lecture at the CUDC, he talked about Havana–past, present, and future. He organized his remarks around a central idea:

    The future never happened by itself. It was created.

    As many have observed, Havana is a city that feels fixed in time. Yet everything is on the verge of change. Buildings, infrastructure, and public spaces throughout the city are crumbling due to the decades-long embargo, widespread poverty, and a complex political system that allocates resources inefficiently. As foreign capital flows into Cuba at an accelerating rate, local entrepreneurs and outside investors are beginning to transform the city. The long term cultural effects and the physical form of the city in the future are as yet unknown. And Havana’s future is yet to be created.

     

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    Professor Coyula is both optimistic and concerned about the future of Havana. He sees opportunities to learn from other cities; that every city can show you something, good or bad. But despite the outside pressures and international influences that will inevitably be part of Havana’s regeneration, his advice to architects and planners in Cuba is to:

    Think Cuban. Be Cuban. Don’t imitate.

    In the US, we’re on the outside looking in. But that too is about to change. Havana poses many complex questions…about architecture, real estate development, historic preservation, and infrastructure networks. We have a remarkable opportunity to both support reconstruction efforts in Havana with new technologies and design expertise, and simultaneously learn from the resourcefulness and tenacity of the many Cubans who’ve held their city together under difficult circumstances for the past six decades.

    Havana remains a vibrant place, though the scale of disinvestment feels overwhelming at times. But there’s good reason for optimism and the US and Cuba gradually rediscover each other.

    The Kent State’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design and the CUDC are exploring opportunities to engage our students, faculty, and research staff in Cuban design issues. In March of 2015, CAED Dean Doug Steidl and CUDC Director Terry Schwarz traveled to Havana with Jorge Delgado and James Thompson of the Joaquin Weiss Institute. The purpose of this trip was to observe the physical environment of the city and provide initial reactions about how future development might evolve. We also used the trip to explore ideas for future academic programs. Our findings are summarized in a report: CUBA_observations.

    The CUDC is grateful to Kent State University President Lester Lefton who provided support for Miguel Coyula’s visit to Cleveland, and also to KSU Professor Anne Morrison who organized the event. Anne is organizing a study trip to Cuba from December 31, 2015 – January 8, 2016. If you’d like to see Cuba for yourself, contact Anne at amorriso[at]kent.edu for more information.

    09-28-15

    Matthew Feinberg Lecture | October 2nd

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    Join us this Friday, October 2nd, for another exciting talk as part of our Fall Lecture Series. We welcome Matthew Feinberg, he will be talking about Re-Making Madrid: Cultural Ecology and the Spanish Economic Crisis.

    Matthew Feinberg holds a PhD in Hispanic Studies from the University of Kentucky. His research studies contemporary Spanish culture with a particular focus on the relationship between theatrical production and urbanism in Madrid’s iconic Lavapiés neighborhood. Combining the analysis of dramatic texts, performance spaces, urban planning documents, and the cultural activities of urban social movements like the indignados or 15-M movement, Professor Feinberg explores how struggles over cultural production are deeply connected to the physical and symbolic shaping of contemporary cities. His work has been published in a range of academic journals including, most recently, the Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies, the Journal of Urban Cultural Studies, and in the forthcoming collection of essays entitled Ethics of Life: Contemporary Iberian Debates. He currently teaches at Case Western Reserve University in the SAGES writing program.

    Free and open to the public. Join us from 12-1 pm at the CUDC.

    Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
    1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
    Cleveland, OH 44115

     

    09-22-15

    Miguel Coyula Lecture | October 7th

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    Miguel Coyula is an architect, urban planner, and professor at the University of Havana. He will give a comprehensive overview of Havana from its origins to the present, ending with an open question shared by many people these day: What kind of city will Havana be in the coming years?

    The event will be held at:

    Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
    Kent State University
    Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
    Cleveland, Ohio 44115
    Directions to the CUDC

    Following Professor Coyula’s talk, there will be a light dinner catered by Earth Bistro Café featuring contemporary American cuisine with a Cuban flair. This event is free and made possible by KSU President Emeritus Lester Lefton, but REGISTRATION is required.

    For any inquiries regarding the event, please contact the CUDC.