ULI Competition Strategy Session | November 20

This Friday, November 20, from 12-1 pm the CUDC lunch lecture will feature strategies for the Urban Land Institute’s 2016 Urban Design Competition. Past participants recognized in the competition will be presenting their work and share their insights for competing in this noted international competition. Interested students for the 2016 competition should consider attending either the lunch lecture, or the ULI Team Formation session, also on Friday, from 5:00-6:30 pm.

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In past years, graduate students from the CUDC, Case Western Reserve University, and Cleveland State University have collaborated together to win four honorable mentions. More information on the competition can be found here.

The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.



Bill Willoughby Lecture | November 6th

Basic CMYK

This week as part of our Fall Lecture Series we welcome Bill Willoughby, Associate Dean and Associate Professor at Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design. His talk is titled, Changing Places: Affect, Activism, and Urban Refitting. Here is an excerpt from Bill about his talk:

“Every day, events affect the city and its citizens. This preceding statement points to the simple potential in all urban places to yield and affect changes upon people and things. The items in a citizen’s pockets or handbag form a geography of occasions, force, and exchanges than have small but precipitous influences throughout the city. Starting with the contents in my pocket, I can derive an affect theory for urban place. From these pocketed forms of identity, access, networks, and instruments of purchase power, transit, political and social affiliation, I envision a theory of affects in which the places where we encounter other people and things are subtly refitted through our actions—and the affect places make on us. This lecture looks at ways artists, architects, and urbanists refit places through art, activism, and other derivations of affect.”

Bill Willoughby is an architect, educator, and essayist. After graduating from Kent State University and beginning his architectural career in Cleveland, he served as an assistant professor at University of North Carolina at Charlotte and later became an educator and administrator at Louisiana Tech University where he served for 15 years. In 2013, he boomeranged back to Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design to serve as Associate Dean and Associate Professor. He founded the Community Design Activism Center (CDAC) at Louisiana Tech University and has published on architecture and urbanism from a cultural studies perspective since 1993.

Join us from 12-1 PM at the CUDC. As always, free and open to the public.

1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115



Commuting the Crooked River; Making a Present out of History


by Dax Roman Godkin

Morning. The river glistens with sunlight and possibilities. I paddle my kayak around a bend. A magnificent great blue heron rises from its quiet hunt in front of me in the river. I have disturbed its potential breakfast and it will have to seek different hunting grounds. The extended spread of the heron’s wings carries it into the horizon, two skinny little legs dangling along like an afterthought.

I am on the Second Annual Crooked River Commute down the Cuyahoga River. Organized by David Jurca, Associate Director of Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collective (CUDC), this trip begins at Kent State’s main campus and ends near the CUDC in Cleveland. More precisely, the trip ends at the river’s egress into Lake Erie at the U.S. Coast Guard station at Whiskey Island, site of the Great Lakes Brewing Company’s Burning River Festival. Many of us brought our own equipment, but there was a generous contribution of boats and gear from Mark Pecot from 41 North Coastal Kayak Adventures. Additional gear was rented from Dan Hudak of River Cruiser Kayaking.

The purpose of this event is to “promote the river as a shared regional asset for education, recreation, and sustainability.” Our intention, besides just enjoying the river, is to look for areas of improvement along the 50-mile stretch of river between Kent and Lake Erie.

The Cuyahoga River has the dubious reputation of catching on fire in the late 1960’s. This was not an isolated event. River fires were not uncommon in those days, but this particular fire became the catalyst for the creation of both the Clean Water Act and the Environmental Protection Agency. Vast improvements in water quality on the river have come about from the interventions of these governmental agencies. There are over forty species of fish that call the Cuyahoga River home, many of which live only in clean waters.

The group met for the first time at Waterworks Park in Kent. Most of us were strangers with David being the primary connection between us. I knew David because we had lived in the same neighborhood for a time. When I heard about last year’s trip, I made sure that I got myself included in this year’s adventure by consistently pestering him for months.
Another member of the crew, David Brandt, a Cleveland Heights native and graduate of Kent State who now resides in the Washington DC area, read about the trip in an alumni newsletter and similarly pestered David to be included. Sometimes it pays to be perseverant.

There was one return member from last year’s trip, Chris Maurer, a freelance architect and instructor at Kent State, who would act as our primary scout and guide.

We all said our hellos and had a little breakfast, then hit the water for the morning.

The weather could not have been nicer, seventy-five degrees, slightly overcast, with an occasional breeze to keep it cool.


The water through Kent was placid and serene. However, as we expected, the water levels of the river were a little low. High-centered on the bedrock and gravel riverbed several times, we scooted our way into deeper water or just got out of the boats and walked around the longer shallows. This did not take away from the beauty of the morning as we wound around the bends in this truly crooked river, talking and laughing, getting to know one another without the usual filters.

Conversations were often interrupted with the necessity to pay attention as we maneuvered through the obstacles and occasional obstructions in the river. We all watched and learned from each other, sometimes following in a member’s path as they had obviously chosen a good line through the potential stickiness, others going a different way as they got stuck in their path; the low water levels adding spice to the complex decision making processes.

We stopped for lunch and a necessary portage of the Sheraton Falls in Cuyahoga Falls. These falls are impassible for all but the most experienced paddlers.

Charles Frederick of the CUDC was in charge of the truck for this portion of the trip. Charles, a member of last year’s Commute, was quite disappointed that a shoulder injury kept him out of this year’s trip. However, his and others efforts as the support crew were invaluable assets to the trip.

A good portion of us rode with the gear in the back of the truck. We felt we were on a secret spy mission during the dark, jostley ride to the next put-in below the falls.

The next section of the trip took us past Akron and into the Cuyahoga Valley National Park. Read more…


Mark Linder Lecture & Exhibition | October 19-23

amcity 2.5 card

We welcome Mark Linder as he presents a special gallery exhibition and talk titled, American City 2.5. The exhibition will be on display October 19-21, 9 am – 5 pm and October 22-23, 9 am – 12 pm. Mark will give a talk about the installation on October 21 at 12 pm. Both the exhibition and the gallery talk will be held at the CUDC. Following Mark’s gallery talk at the CUDC, he will be speaking at Kent State University’s Schwartz Center 177 at 6:30 pm.

Exhibition: On display October 19-21, 9 am – 5 pm and October 22-23, 9 am – 12 pm
Gallery Talk: October  21 @ 12:00 noon, CUDC
“American City 2.5”
American City 2.5 explores the imaging capacities of geographic information systems (GIS) as a mode of urban design. It is the most recent in a series of GIS projects that began in 2001 as transdisciplinary research on the differing capabilities, spatial logics, and disciplinary bases of GIS and CAD software. This project exploits the geo-processing and graphic capacities of GIS to transform the discrete categories and boundaries of census and municipal data into pliable, even plastic, relational images that can suggest new spatial networks, gaps, intensities, densities, and affiliations. We propose a hybridized, cross-programmed, and more efficient public services network that combines the scales, infrastructures, operations, programs, and constituencies of four underfunded, atrophying public institutions -schools, libraries, post offices, and bus transit- in the context of hydrology and economy. Our imaging techniques aspire to manifest dissensual and differential space in which “the people” does not consist of individual data points in a census of the population, and citizens are not units of demographic categorization or subjects in a policed domain of information. Rather, the people are reformulated as relative, unstable, and latent communities in an improper spatial mapping of an amalgamated, networked public institution.

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Kent State University Lecture: Wednesday, October 21 @ 6:30 PM, Schwartz Center 177 
“The New Brutal: Images, Mies and the Smithsons”
What might architectural practice become if its primary means and ends were images? Imaging is a field of inquiry and possibility with fundamental challenges for architecture today. It is also a field with a history in architecture, and a clear beginning in the work and ideas of the New Brutalist architects affiliated with the Independent Group of 1950s Britain, most famously theorized by Reyner Banham as topological “image-making.” The New Brutal is increasingly pertinent in today’s world of dense, instantaneous, superficial actualities which are as prevalent, and as necessary to grapple with, in architecture’s production, reception and dissemination as in any other field.

Mark Linder is a Professor of Architecture at Syracuse University, where he has chaired the graduate programs, coordinated the New York City program, and served as Chancellor’s Fellow in the Humanities. His research pursues design theory and history considered in a transdisciplinary framework and is focused on modern architecture since 1950. He is the author of Nothing Less than Literal: Architecture after Minimalism (MIT 2004) and is currently at work on a book titled That’s Brutal, What’s Modern? on the alternative mid-century modernisms, or Miesianisms, of Alison and Peter Smithson, Walter Segal, John Hejduk, and others. He has taught as a visiting professor at the University of Michigan, Harvard, University of Illinois-Chicago, Rice University, IIT, RISD, and UCLA.

His most recent work explores the potential of image studies for architecture. As Chancellor’s Fellow in the Humanities (2011-14) he taught a seminar and organized an event series, titled IMAGES?Precisely!, which focused on the ways that the precise analysis, application, and understanding of images invite innovative research methods and collaborations, and promise to shuffle the presumed territories, limits, affiliations, and purposes of academic fields. A website, imagesproject.org documents the results of that work.




Havana: the future never happened by itself…



On October 7th, the CUDC hosted a lecture by the influential Cuban architect and urban planner, Miguel Coyula. Professor Coyula is on the faculty at the University of Havana. In his lecture at the CUDC, he talked about Havana–past, present, and future. He organized his remarks around a central idea:

The future never happened by itself. It was created.

As many have observed, Havana is a city that feels fixed in time. Yet everything is on the verge of change. Buildings, infrastructure, and public spaces throughout the city are crumbling due to the decades-long embargo, widespread poverty, and a complex political system that allocates resources inefficiently. As foreign capital flows into Cuba at an accelerating rate, local entrepreneurs and outside investors are beginning to transform the city. The long term cultural effects and the physical form of the city in the future are as yet unknown. And Havana’s future is yet to be created.



Professor Coyula is both optimistic and concerned about the future of Havana. He sees opportunities to learn from other cities; that every city can show you something, good or bad. But despite the outside pressures and international influences that will inevitably be part of Havana’s regeneration, his advice to architects and planners in Cuba is to:

Think Cuban. Be Cuban. Don’t imitate.

In the US, we’re on the outside looking in. But that too is about to change. Havana poses many complex questions…about architecture, real estate development, historic preservation, and infrastructure networks. We have a remarkable opportunity to both support reconstruction efforts in Havana with new technologies and design expertise, and simultaneously learn from the resourcefulness and tenacity of the many Cubans who’ve held their city together under difficult circumstances for the past six decades.

Havana remains a vibrant place, though the scale of disinvestment feels overwhelming at times. But there’s good reason for optimism and the US and Cuba gradually rediscover each other.

The Kent State’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design and the CUDC are exploring opportunities to engage our students, faculty, and research staff in Cuban design issues. In March of 2015, CAED Dean Doug Steidl and CUDC Director Terry Schwarz traveled to Havana with Jorge Delgado and James Thompson of the Joaquin Weiss Institute. The purpose of this trip was to observe the physical environment of the city and provide initial reactions about how future development might evolve. We also used the trip to explore ideas for future academic programs. Our findings are summarized in a report: CUBA_observations.

The CUDC is grateful to Kent State University President Lester Lefton who provided support for Miguel Coyula’s visit to Cleveland, and also to KSU Professor Anne Morrison who organized the event. Anne is organizing a study trip to Cuba from December 31, 2015 – January 8, 2016. If you’d like to see Cuba for yourself, contact Anne at amorriso[at]kent.edu for more information.


Matthew Feinberg Lecture | October 2nd


Join us this Friday, October 2nd, for another exciting talk as part of our Fall Lecture Series. We welcome Matthew Feinberg, he will be talking about Re-Making Madrid: Cultural Ecology and the Spanish Economic Crisis.

Matthew Feinberg holds a PhD in Hispanic Studies from the University of Kentucky. His research studies contemporary Spanish culture with a particular focus on the relationship between theatrical production and urbanism in Madrid’s iconic Lavapiés neighborhood. Combining the analysis of dramatic texts, performance spaces, urban planning documents, and the cultural activities of urban social movements like the indignados or 15-M movement, Professor Feinberg explores how struggles over cultural production are deeply connected to the physical and symbolic shaping of contemporary cities. His work has been published in a range of academic journals including, most recently, the Journal of Spanish Cultural Studies, the Journal of Urban Cultural Studies, and in the forthcoming collection of essays entitled Ethics of Life: Contemporary Iberian Debates. He currently teaches at Case Western Reserve University in the SAGES writing program.

Free and open to the public. Join us from 12-1 pm at the CUDC.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115



Miguel Coyula Lecture | October 7th

miguel coyula_2

Miguel Coyula is an architect, urban planner, and professor at the University of Havana. He will give a comprehensive overview of Havana from its origins to the present, ending with an open question shared by many people these day: What kind of city will Havana be in the coming years?

The event will be held at:

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
Kent State University
Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, Ohio 44115
Directions to the CUDC

Following Professor Coyula’s talk, there will be a light dinner catered by Earth Bistro Café featuring contemporary American cuisine with a Cuban flair. This event is free and made possible by KSU President Emeritus Lester Lefton, but REGISTRATION is required.

For any inquiries regarding the event, please contact the CUDC.



Future City Sessions | McLain Clutter

future city logo

The CUDC’s Future City Sessions are an exploration of emerging ideas in urban design and citymaking. These sessions, developed with the support of The George Gund Foundation, will take place in the fall and winter of 2015/16. Each session will begin with a public presentation or workshop on a specific topic by a leading national thinker.  Following the public session, we will host a smaller, facilitated conversation over a meal with our guest speaker and a thoughtfully selected group of Greater Clevelanders. During these conversations, we can explore big and useful ideas in a comfortable setting, and uncover new directions in urban design that will be relevant locally and on a broader scale. These conversations will be captured and published as a book or a series of pamphlets so the discoveries made in conversation can be shared with the widest possible audience.

Our first Future City Session will feature a GIS Workshop: Fake Places and Data Shapes on Cleveland’s Opportunity Corridor taught by McLain Clutter on September 25th. This workshop will introduce participants to experimental workflows and data manipulation processes in conventional GIS software platforms in order to illuminate latent potentials for progressive urban design. The workshop is free, but limited, so please register soon. For more information and to register click here.

Eschewing the conventional use of GIS software, this workshop will introduce participants to experimental workflows between standard GIS software, publicly available datasets, and visualization software more common to architectural practice. McLain’s goal will be to reveal urban development potentials that are solicitous of new forms of public life, aesthetic regimes, formal conglomerations, urban intensities, and more. The workshop will entail a lecture delivering a conceptual framework through which to understand the potentials and liabilities of GIS as an urban design medium, an introduction to the ESRI ArcGIS software environment, and advanced instruction on unconventional and complex methods of spatial data manipulation, working between ArcGIS and architectural visualization software.


The Monday following the workshop, McLain will give a public lecture entitled Master of None at the CUDC , September 28th at 6 PM. McLain’s lecture will focus on his design practice that is dedicated to rethinking architecture’s disciplinary capacities within the complexities of contemporary urbanism. This event is free, but registration is requested. For more information and to register please click here.

McLain Clutter, is an architect, writer, and Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture. Clutter received a Bachelor of Architecture from Syracuse University and an MED from the Yale School of Architecture, where he was the recipient of the Everett Victor Meeks Fellowship. He has worked in design offices in New York, Chicago and New Haven on a diverse array of projects ranging in scale from residential renovations to urban master planning.

Register for GIS Workshop – September 25, 2015, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

Register for McLain Clutter Lecture – September 28, 2015, 6:00 pm


Bialosky Day at our Design RE/build House


Every other weekend this summer, volunteers have been coming out of the woodwork* to help us finish constructing Kent State University’s first Design RE/build house in the St. Clair-Superior neighborhood of Cleveland. Lots of progress has taken place at the house, not least because of the boundless, donut-fueled energy of our crews.

On August 22nd six employees from Bialosky + Partners Architects donated their time, energy, and expertise to the project. Alongside our other enthusiastic volunteers, the construction crew graded landscape, placed insulation, installed cabinets & countertops, replaced floorboards, welded guardrails, and many other important jobs around the project. The project is finally nearing the extra-fun finishing details, when we’re really getting to apply our creativity.



For those of you thinking how much fun this all looks, you’re in luck! We’ve extended the schedule through September and October. Our 5 remaining dates are:

  • September 5
  • September 19
  • October 3
  • October 17
  • October 31 : Halloween House Party!

These dates are tentative and may change, based on our progress, so check our Facebook page regularly for updates and email Kristen Zeiber at kzeiber [at] kent.edu to get on the mailing list.

Also, if your firm is interested in “sponsoring” a day at the Design RE/build house, let us know. This is a great opportunity for your architects & interns to get out of the office for a day and get some hands-on experience in the field (plus PR for your firm). AIA Associates, you’re eligible to use the volunteer hours towards your IDP Leadership and Service hours too! Just email Kristen with any questions and we’ll set you up.


Thanks to all our dedicated students, volunteers, and community members who are supporting this project! The end is in sight, and we couldn’t be more excited to see the finishing touches emerge.

* – please forgive the construction pun.

This project is generously funded by The George Gund Foundation, Sandvick Architects, Sears-Swetland Family Foundation, and the Helen Brown Fund. Additional support from 84 Lumber, RoosWork, VIP Restoration, and St. Clair Superior Development Corporation


To view more photos of our Design RE/build house click here.


Making Our Own Space (MOOS) focuses on youth to build community environments


Created in January 2015, MakingOurOwnSpace (MOOS) is a collaborative effort between Cleveland youth and local design professionals to empower the next generation of placemakers. Led by the CUDC, the project trains middle and high school students as community designers. Over the course of nine months, students will design and construct multiple public environments and outdoor playscapes.

Britt Oval, a large green space across the street from St. Luke’s Pointe, will serve as the site for all the outdoor constructions. Three on-site projects will be built by the students to respond to changing weather conditions and user preferences. Although the projects will be short-term, they are intended to guide future investments in permanent public space enhancements on the site.



Youth participating in the MOOS project include 7th & 8th graders from the Boys and Girls Clubs and high school students from East End Youth Services. The students, along with two adult leaders from the local community, will be paid a stipend for their participation. The project will increase collaboration across community-based organizations, residents, and public/private partners. The CUDC has brought in architect Erick Rodriguez and graphic designer Arlene Watson to teach workshops. As well as, Alex Gilliam of Public Workshop to teach a week long class.

Freshwater Cleveland recently spoke with David Jurca, our Associate Director and one of the leaders spearheading MOOS about the initiative and our upcoming event Splash on Britt Oval that is taking place on August 8th. Here is an excerpt from the article:

“On a sunny Friday afternoon at the park, Jurca asks Streeter and McClain-Ferrell, “What do you hope to get from this?”

“To get people to come and keep coming back. So they want to build things of their own,” says McClain-Ferrell. “I just want to be able to say, ‘I made that.’”

This is their park made to their specifications. And that’s no small feat.

Jurca knows that although community planning often focuses on creating spaces for youth, those very same voices are regularly left out of the actual discussion. The format of public meetings aren’t aligned to make them feel welcome, Jurca says, whether it’s the time, location or questions asked.”


Learn more about MOOS and read the entire article here. Also come out this Saturday and check it out for yourself. There will be music, games, hot dogs and ice cream from 12-2 PM. The event is free and open to the public and will be happening rain or shine. Britt Oval is located across the street from Saint Luke’s Foundation, 11327 Shaker Blvd., Cleveland, OH 44104.



Chris Connell Lecture Cancelled


chris connell lecture

The Chris Connell Lecture has been cancelled. We will updated your when it is rescheduled and apologize for any inconvenience. 

Join AIA Cleveland for a lecture by Chris Connell of Foster + Partners, Partner in Charge of the Health Education Campus, a joint venture with the Cleveland Clinic and Case Western Reserve University.

When: Wednesday, August 5th 6:00pm – 8:00pm

Where: CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44115

Cost: $5 for AIA Members (Must provide valid AIA #)

$15 for Non-Members

Free for all Students

Drinks and snacks will be provided for those in attendance. This program is worth 1.0 HSW CEU. Seating is limited and  advanced registration is required.



Volunteer at our design/REbuild house!


Can new design and construction ideas breathe life back into some of  Cleveland’s houses?

We believe that design brings value, and may help others re-envision the possibilities for Cleveland’s undervalued housing stock. Every year Cleveland loses thousands of houses to demolition.

In 2014 a 3rd year Kent State University architecture studio led by Chris Maurer examined design possibilities for radically renovating an existing vacant brick house, 1045 E 67th St. Over the summer, CAED/CAEST students worked on-site every afternoon to realize their collective design vision.

In 2015, we’re returning to the house to finish construction with the aim of selling it in the fall and using the funds to renovate another house in 2016. And we’re looking for volunteers to join us!

Five Saturdays in 2015 – July 11; July 25; August 08; August 22; and September 05 – we’ll be on-site working 8:00AM-4:00PM at the house. If you’re interested in volunteering please reach out to Kristen Zeiber via email: kzeiber[at]kent.edu – we’ll put you on our list and email out the to-do tasks the week ahead of every Saturday. Earn Community Outreach IDP hours, bring tools for the day if you have them, and come as you can, whenever you can.

Thanks in advance for all your help! For more information on the design/REbuild house visit here.


2015 AIA Cleveland Sand Castle Competition and Volleyball Tournament | July 18th


AIA Cleveland is bringing back their annual summer festival that will bring architecture and design firm personnel and their families together with the public to celebrate design and enjoy the beach! The AIA Cleveland Sand Castle Competition and Beach Volleyball Tournament will take place at Edgewater Beach on Saturday, July 18th and feature a competition of more than two dozen sand castle and volleyball teams populated by Cleveland architecture, engineering, and construction firms.

When: Saturday, July 18th

Where: Edgewater Beach

10 AM – Castle Competition / Volleyball Tournament Begins
5 PM – Parade of Castles, Jury
6 PM – Championship Volleyball Match & Awards Presentation

Registration closes Friday, July 3rd. Register HERE to build collegiality within the architectural community and raise design awareness across Cleveland.


Urban Agriculture in Cuba: film + talk


Please join us for a brown bag lunch talk with Cuban agronomist Isis Salcines along with a screening of the film, Tierralismo

This free event will take place at the CUDC (1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200) on May 27 from noon-1pm. Please bring your lunch–we’ll provide drinks and snacks.

About the film…

TIERRALISMO A film by Alejandro Ramirez Anderson

On the outskirts of Havana, sandwiched between highways and public housing, a revolution is taking place. Here, in the district of Alamar, a 26-acre farming co-op provides employment for dozens of workers, while producing vegetables and medicinal plants for the local community and beyond.

Following the collapse of the Soviet Bloc in the early 1990s, Cuba was no longer able to access machinery and agricultural chemicals from its former Communist allies. In this difficult environment, the government relaxed economic rules and allowed the formation of cooperatives like the Organopónico Vivero Alamar.

What began as necessity—farming without pesticides and chemical fertilizers—has become a source of pride to coop members. They fertilize with compost and cow manure, raise their own insects for biological pest control, and have even created a fully biodegradable alternative to the plastic bag for use with seedlings.

Tierralismo introduces us to everyone from agronomists and senior management to workers who plant, plow, and propagate. The film also covers non-farming aspects of the operation, such as human resources and accounting practices where transparency is paramount.

Lovingly photographed, TIERRALISMO offers a behind-the-scenes portrait of the Organopónico Vivero Alamar and a stirring defense of the importance of farm work and sustainable farming practices.


About the speaker…

Following the film, Isis Salcines, Projects Coordinator in the Projects and Investments Office at the Organoponico, will give a presentation about her work. Ms. Salcines holds an advanced studies degree in Agricultural Engineering and has been with Organoponico since 1998. During her time at the cooperative, she has launched a new food preservation project and has focused on the marketing and distribution of local organic produce to domestic and international markets.

For more information about the event, please contact the CUDC here.


Keith Hayes + Nikole Bouchard | In Version: The Mistaking of Placemaking

hayes bouchard event blog

Join AIA Cleveland and the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative for the next lecture in the Emerging Practitioners Series as we welcome visiting designers Keith Hayes and Nikole Bouchard. Based in Milwaukee, Keith and Nikole are currently working in Cleveland’s St. Clair Superior neighborhood on the matireal landshape project. Focused on creating an up-cycled public plaza, the project will reuse discarded tires to construct topography and engage residents to build community.

In Version: The Mistaking of Placemaking
A first hand perspective on the amalgam of forces at work (Keith) and the role of architecture in the field of public interest design (Nikole).

Friday, April 24, 2015
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115
Lecture is free and open to the public.
Visit the Facebook event page here.

2015-04-14 - EPLS_560px

As a designer and social entrepreneur, Keith Hayes is informed by interfacing with resources, landscape, and language.

ln 2010, he launched beintween, a social and spatial organization improv(is)ing leftover spaces, based in Milwaukee, WI. Noteworthy accomplishments include a successfully funded Kickstarter for matireal, an 8 acre linear corridor known as the artery, a guerilla installation known as the swing park, and the organization of a design/build coopetition. He is now actively pursuing partnerships to develop a takerspace, the reclamation of a double lot + vacant home in Milwaukee, in addition to a plaza proposal in Cleveland. Hayes informs his practice through the application of relationships, resources, and research through a process he refers to as sp/acement, whereby arts and cultural development become a retainer of community rather than a token to displace it.

University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, MArch
University of Miami, BArch

Nikole Bouchard’s research focuses on how the intersection between architecture, landscape, and infrastructure can stimulate ecologically sensitive and culturally relevant design interventions.

Nikole has previously taught at Syracuse University, Cornell University, The University of Waterloo and The University of Toronto. While teaching in Canada, Nikole collaborated with Toronto-based InfraNet Lab/Lateral Office on various design competitions and exhibitions. During this time, a number of award-winning projects were produced, including the 2011 Holcim Gold project Regional Food-Gathering Nodes and Logistics Network in Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada. Prior to joining InfraNet Lab/Lateral Office, Nikole worked at the offices of Steven Holl Architects and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP in New York City.

Princeton University, MArch
Cornell University, BArch

For more information, contact the CUDC at cudc(at)kent.edu or call (216) 357-3438.