09-15-16

Charles Waldheim | Oct 6

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Charles Waldheim is a Canadian-American architect and urbanist. Waldheim’s research examines the relations between landscape, ecology, and contemporary urbanism. He is an author, editor, or co-editor of numerous books, including the soon to be published, Third Coast Atlas. Join us on October 6, 2016 at 5:30 PM. This event is free and open to the public, but RSVP is requested.

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Measuring over 10,000 miles, the Great Lakes coastline, known as the “third coast,” is longer than the Atlantic and Pacific coastlines of the United States combined. It is difficult to overstate the history and future of the region as both a contested and opportunistic site for urbanism. Envisaged as a comprehensive “atlas,” this publication comprises in-depth analysis of the landscapes, hydrology, infrastructure, urban form, and ecologies of the region, delivered through a series of analytical cartographies supported by scholarly and design research from internationally renowned scholars, photographers, and practitioners from the disciplines of architecture, landscape, geography, planning, and ecology.

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Following Waldheim’s presentation, there will be a panel discussion with several contributors to the Third Coast Atlas, including:

 Steve Litt, art and architecture critic at the Plain Dealer will moderate the discussion.

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The Future City Sessions are an on-going explore of emerging ideas in urban design and city-making made possible by the support of The George Gund Foundation.

AICP|CM credits will be provided for this event, sponsored by APA Cleveland

Thursday, October 6, 2016

5:30pm – 7:00pm

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

RSVP HERE

07-07-16

Call for Submissions | Future City Sessions Pamphlet 4: Age-Friendly Cities

The CUDC seeks written or graphic submissions for its Urban Infill publication. Urban Infill is the journal of Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative. The upcoming issue (Urban Infill 8) will be a series of pamphlets, bound together, that explore five broad topic areas in urban design and city-making. Pamphlet 4: Age-Friendly Cities is part of an initiative launched by the CUDC and with support from the George Gund Foundation called the Future City Sessions. The Future City Sessions are about informing practice—how can we anticipate emerging urban trends and embed them into current urban design practice? Submissions of realized urban projects, speculative designs, texts, and photo essays are encouraged for the August 26th deadline. Text is limited to 1000 words.

Pamphlet 4: Age-Friendly Cities seeks to address the following questions:

  • What changes to a city’s physical and social infrastructure are needed to make them more age-inclusive?
  • What projects and amenities are serving the needs of seniors well?
  • How can we reconsider the development and spatial model of senior developments to enable alternative forms of community?
  • Are there cities in the US of elsewhere that are especially well-suited to the needs of the aging populations? What can be learned from these places, and in what ways can we foster better environments in all cities?

Please send your work to cudc@kent.edu and include “Urban Infill” in the subject line of your email. Entries are due August 26, 2016.

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06-07-16

Future City Sessions: Aging in Cities | Matthias Hollwich

matthias_hollwichOn June 23rd at 5:30pm, the CUDC will host architect Matthias Hollwich. Matthias recently published the book with Bruce Mau Design called New Aging: Live Smarter Now to Live Better Forever.

New Aging investigates and applies recent advances in architecture and urbanism to address age-related challenges that assures the best utilization with the utmost dignity for age. There are 17,000 Medicare and Medicate certified nursing homes in the United States, which basically store old people away. Some of these places are decorated to seem “home like” with floral wallpaper and vinyl wooden floors, but these homey touches do not disguise the fact that our culture shuns the aged and prefers them out of sight. We are interested in the alternative. From “Geropolis, the city of the elderly” to “BOOM” our research is intellectual, human, and architectural. – Matthias Hollwich

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Matthias Hollwich is the co-founding principal of progressive New York architecture firm Hollwich Kushner (HWKN) and Architizer, the largest platform for architecture online.

Having previously led design teams within internationally acclaimed firms such as Rem Koolhaas’ Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), Eisenman Architects, and Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Matthias has established himself at the forefront of a new generation of ground-and rule-breaking international architects.

Combining his understanding of how architecture and cities can perform better with his research as a visiting professor at the University of Pennsylvania, Matthias has developed a new line of thinking about how to make aging an empowering process. He has since shared this message at events for TEDx, PICNIC, the World Health Organization, and the New Aging conference at University of Pennsylvania.

The event is free and open to the public, but RSVP is requested. **Please note: Dr. Margaret Caulkins was initially scheduled to be a co-presenter at this event. Do to an unforeseen conflict, she will not be able to participate. A recorded version of her presentation will be available on the CUDC website following the event. Apologies for any inconvenience.

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The Future City Sessions are an on-going explore of emerging ideas in urban design and city-making made possible by the support of The George Gund Foundation.

AICP|CM credits will be provided for this event, sponsored by APA Cleveland. 


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Thursday, June 23, 2016
5:30pm – 7:00pm

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

RSVP HERE

 

04-18-16

Future City Sessions Pamphlet 2 & 3 | Call for Entries

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The CUDC seeks written or graphic submissions for two separate publications. “Variability & Urban Change” & “Getting it Done: Urban Development” are part of an initiative launched by the CUDC and with support from the George Gund Foundation called the Future City Sessions. The Future City Sessions are about informing practice—how can we anticipate emerging urban trends and embed them into current urban design practice? Submissions of realized urban projects, speculative designs, texts, and photo essays are encouraged for the May 30th deadline. Text is limited to 1000 words.

For more details about submissions, please see the linked calls: Pamphlet 2: Variability & Urban Change and Pamphlet 3: Getting it Done: Urban Development.

Each of the publications seeks to address the following questions:

Variability & Urban Change:

  • Given climate change and increased weather variability, how can design be more responsive to fluctuating & unpredictable conditions?
  • What projects (infrastructural, architectural, public space, or policies) contribute to a more nuanced understanding of our relationship to change and variability in our urban environment?
  • In what ways can variability and adaptability be used as a design tool to improve the quality of life for individuals and communities?
  • In what ways has indeterminacy affected things like public space activation, development agendas, and geographic migration?

 

Getting it Done: Urban Development:

  • What can be learned from already implemented projects that can help spur innovation?
  • What are the gaps and missing pieces to creating substantive and scalable development models that maximize community benefit?
  • What are the specific ways in which the private, public, and institutional sectors can provide better solutions? Are there ways to foster better co-disciplinary collaboration and timing?
  • Between funding mechanisms, building codes, zoning, & design imagination-what are the various tools and disciplines that could be adapted for better outcomes? Where are there good examples of this

 

Please send your work to cudc[at]kent.edu and include “Urban Infill” in the subject line of your email. Entries are due May 30th, 2016.

01-03-16

Sergio Lopez-Pineiro Lecture | Feb 20

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Please join us at the Brite Winter Fest for an engaging talk from Harvard’s Sergio Lopez-Pineiro entitled, “Three Models of Public Space: Adventure Playgrounds, Whiteswards, and Speakers’ Corners.” Lopez-Pineiro’s lecture will be followed by an announcement of the winners of this year’s COLDSCAPES Design Competition.

Saturday, February 20th
3 – 4:30pm
Brite Winter Festival
Music Box Supper Club | Lower Level
1148 Main Avenue
Flats West Bank, Cleveland, OH


Click here to RSVP


Architect Sergio Lopez-Pineiro’s presentation will focus on the imagination and protection of truly open (indeterminate) public space. His research offers insights on how cities can embrace uncertainty, with particular applications for variable winter weather conditions. According to Lopez-Pineiro, cities do not require more specifically defined and controlled public space—despite current political discourses ignited by fear. Rather, we need to think of public space as a source of diversity and relatedness. In order to do this, future cities need to go beyond traditional models of public space. Voids are an opportunity for this alternative type of public space. Programmatic and seasonal temporality is an essential factor in the creation and protection of this openness and indeterminacy.

Lopez-PineiroSnowscape1Image: Sergio Lopez-Pineiro’s project, Olmsted’s Blank Snow, received an Honorable Mention in the 2013 Coldscapes Design Competition

As part of the CUDC’s Future City Sessions, the talk will explore an emerging idea in citymaking and is intended to provoke discussion about applications for Northeast Ohio. Lopez-Pineiro’s talk will lay out specific spatial qualities and how these can ignite an alternative type of public space. The value of indeterminacy will be illustrated by a range of projects, including his whitesward landscape project Olmsted’s Blank Snow.

Sergio Lopez-Pineiro designs and writes about gaps found in everyday spaces, appearing due to mismatched relationships between social structures and spatial organizations. He is the founder of design practice Holes of Matter and 2014-15 Daniel Urban Kiley Fellow in Landscape Architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. He has taught widely, primarily at the University at Buffalo, where he was the 2006-07 Reyner Banham Fellow. His work has been supported by several institutions such as the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA) and The MacDowell Colony, and has been published and featured in MAS Context, Bracket, arq: Architecture Research Quarterly, Places, 2G, and the Boston Globe, amongst others.

fieldsImage: Studies of continuous, homogeneous, and non-hierarchical Spatial Fields by Holes of Matter

Lopez-Pineiro graduated from ETSAM (Escuela Técnica Superior de Arquitectura de Madrid) in 1998 and received his M.Arch. degree from Princeton University in 2004, where he was awarded the Suzanne Kolarik Underwood Prize. A registered architect in Spain, Lopez-Pineiro has worked at No.mad (Madrid, 1998-2000) and at Foreign Office Architects (London, 2000-2002).

This Future City Session is made possible by the generous support of the George Gund Foundation. The lecture is also part of this year’s Center for Outdoor Living Design (COLD) program, supported by the Ohio Arts Council and Brite Winter.

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11-17-15

Future City Sessions | Call for Submissions

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Urban Infill is the journal of Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative. The current issue (Urban Infill 8) will be a series of pamphlets, bound together, that explore emerging ideas in urban design and city-making. Each pamphlet will correspond to conversations and public events held at the CUDC in 2015/16 under the banner of The Future City Sessions, sponsored by the George Gund Foundation.

We are currently seeking short works (text, images, or both) to be included in the first pamphlet on urban data, geographic information systems, and new design scenarios for cities that result from understanding and manipulating vast amounts of information.

We’re particularly interested in the older industrial cities of the Great Lakes region, but welcome contributions about other cities if they are broadly applicable to the topic or offer a useful comparison or contrast to Great Lakes conditions.

Click HERE to view Key Questions and Submission Guidelines. The deadline for submissions is January 11, 2016, 5:00 PM (EST).