The Public Library: Designing a Community Asset

Recently, HBM Architects received national attention for their leading-edge library projects. The CUDC’s new Post-Graduate Fellow, Sam Friesema, worked for the firm and had a hand in the recognized projects. This is his story about his involvement and how he plans to bring his expertise to our work with the Cleveland Public Library and their CPL150 Community Vision Plan.

Before joining the CUDC, I had the privilege of working for HBM Architects for 4 ½ years. HBM specializes in library planning and design and has worked with over 300 libraries throughout the country. Libraries are in an exciting period of exploration where traditional library services are transitioning as technologies rapidly alter information access in our society. Libraries are becoming community centers and neighborhood technology hubs. Instead of housing books they now house activities, workshops, cafés, performance spaces, interactive learning areas for all ages, and yes, still a few books.

Libraries are an integral part of any city. As a public amenity, libraries build upon input from the community to construct spaces which meet local needs. While we can only guess what the library of the future might look like, several new projects give a glimpse into cutting edge library design. Four HBM projects recently received national attention for their innovative architectural visions of the contemporary library. I was fortunate to work on all of these projects at varying capacities.

hbm projects

Click on project name for more images and information:


Projects range in size and scope, from adaptive reuse to new construction. While each project is very unique, themes start to emerge as to where library services are headed: Open floor plans, flexible meeting spaces, technology saturation, less book shelves, casual seating areas, maker spaces, interactive early childhood literacy areas, all act to inspire the next generation of public library users.

Looking ahead, I am excited by the CUDC’s involvement with Cleveland Public Library’s CPL150 Community Vision Plan and hope to continue contributing to the library world in my new role here at the CUDC.

-Sam Friesema, Graduate Fellow


Future City Sessions | McLain Clutter

future city logo

The CUDC’s Future City Sessions are an exploration of emerging ideas in urban design and citymaking. These sessions, developed with the support of The George Gund Foundation, will take place in the fall and winter of 2015/16. Each session will begin with a public presentation or workshop on a specific topic by a leading national thinker.  Following the public session, we will host a smaller, facilitated conversation over a meal with our guest speaker and a thoughtfully selected group of Greater Clevelanders. During these conversations, we can explore big and useful ideas in a comfortable setting, and uncover new directions in urban design that will be relevant locally and on a broader scale. These conversations will be captured and published as a book or a series of pamphlets so the discoveries made in conversation can be shared with the widest possible audience.

Our first Future City Session will feature a GIS Workshop: Fake Places and Data Shapes on Cleveland’s Opportunity Corridor taught by McLain Clutter on September 25th. This workshop will introduce participants to experimental workflows and data manipulation processes in conventional GIS software platforms in order to illuminate latent potentials for progressive urban design. The workshop is free, but limited, so please register soon. For more information and to register click here.

Eschewing the conventional use of GIS software, this workshop will introduce participants to experimental workflows between standard GIS software, publicly available datasets, and visualization software more common to architectural practice. McLain’s goal will be to reveal urban development potentials that are solicitous of new forms of public life, aesthetic regimes, formal conglomerations, urban intensities, and more. The workshop will entail a lecture delivering a conceptual framework through which to understand the potentials and liabilities of GIS as an urban design medium, an introduction to the ESRI ArcGIS software environment, and advanced instruction on unconventional and complex methods of spatial data manipulation, working between ArcGIS and architectural visualization software.


The Monday following the workshop, McLain will give a public lecture entitled Master of None at the CUDC , September 28th at 6 PM. McLain’s lecture will focus on his design practice that is dedicated to rethinking architecture’s disciplinary capacities within the complexities of contemporary urbanism. This event is free, but registration is requested. For more information and to register please click here.

McLain Clutter, is an architect, writer, and Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture. Clutter received a Bachelor of Architecture from Syracuse University and an MED from the Yale School of Architecture, where he was the recipient of the Everett Victor Meeks Fellowship. He has worked in design offices in New York, Chicago and New Haven on a diverse array of projects ranging in scale from residential renovations to urban master planning.

Register for GIS Workshop – September 25, 2015, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

Register for McLain Clutter Lecture – September 28, 2015, 6:00 pm


AIA Cleveland Emerging Practitioner Lecture Series | John Cerone

john cerone

Join us for an evening with John Cerone, Director of Virtual Design & Construction at SHoP Architects. John has been instrumental in SHoP’s development of technology and process, specializing in Building Information Modeling (BIM).

Honing Digital Design and Delivery (1 CEU)

Learning Objectives
• Model-based project delivery
• Parametric design-to-fabrication workflow efficiencies
• CNC-driven fabrication & data management
• Collaboration via cloud-based platforms

John received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the School of Architecture at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio (2002), and his Master of Architecture degree from the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University (2008). He currently serves as an Adjunct Professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Planning and Preservation, teaching seminars in ‘Digital Representation’ and ‘Parametric Modeling’. He has taught at Parsons New School for Design in New York and actively lectures on the topic of Virtual Design & Construction.

This lecture is brought to you by AIA Cleveland as part of their Emerging Practitioner Lecture Series and is sponsored by 3form.



Making Our Own Space (MOOS) focuses on youth to build community environments


Created in January 2015, MakingOurOwnSpace (MOOS) is a collaborative effort between Cleveland youth and local design professionals to empower the next generation of placemakers. Led by the CUDC, the project trains middle and high school students as community designers. Over the course of nine months, students will design and construct multiple public environments and outdoor playscapes.

Britt Oval, a large green space across the street from St. Luke’s Pointe, will serve as the site for all the outdoor constructions. Three on-site projects will be built by the students to respond to changing weather conditions and user preferences. Although the projects will be short-term, they are intended to guide future investments in permanent public space enhancements on the site.



Youth participating in the MOOS project include 7th & 8th graders from the Boys and Girls Clubs and high school students from East End Youth Services. The students, along with two adult leaders from the local community, will be paid a stipend for their participation. The project will increase collaboration across community-based organizations, residents, and public/private partners. The CUDC has brought in architect Erick Rodriguez and graphic designer Arlene Watson to teach workshops. As well as, Alex Gilliam of Public Workshop to teach a week long class.

Freshwater Cleveland recently spoke with David Jurca, our Associate Director and one of the leaders spearheading MOOS about the initiative and our upcoming event Splash on Britt Oval that is taking place on August 8th. Here is an excerpt from the article:

“On a sunny Friday afternoon at the park, Jurca asks Streeter and McClain-Ferrell, “What do you hope to get from this?”

“To get people to come and keep coming back. So they want to build things of their own,” says McClain-Ferrell. “I just want to be able to say, ‘I made that.’”

This is their park made to their specifications. And that’s no small feat.

Jurca knows that although community planning often focuses on creating spaces for youth, those very same voices are regularly left out of the actual discussion. The format of public meetings aren’t aligned to make them feel welcome, Jurca says, whether it’s the time, location or questions asked.”


Learn more about MOOS and read the entire article here. Also come out this Saturday and check it out for yourself. There will be music, games, hot dogs and ice cream from 12-2 PM. The event is free and open to the public and will be happening rain or shine. Britt Oval is located across the street from Saint Luke’s Foundation, 11327 Shaker Blvd., Cleveland, OH 44104.



CPL150: Community Vision Plan released and available for download


The CUDC partnered with the Cleveland Public Library (CPL) to conduct a planning process with four branch communities, together envisioning the 21st century library. CPL faces a challenge familiar to many institutions serving communities in Cleveland: How can we best meet the needs of our patrons in a changing context of new technologies, aging facilities, and declining population? CPL’s response to this question must be crafted individually for each branch neighborhood, based on the unique demands and opportunities present in those communities. The CUDC’s local knowledge of Cleveland neighborhoods and expertise in public engagement, depopulation research, and physical urban planning provide the complementary skills to enable CPL to take the next step in crafting an equitable Community Vision Plan.



The report articulates a wide-range of community priorities and reveals a clearer vision of the library’s role in each target area. Neighborhood asset maps, programming concepts, and visual renderings produced through this process enable CPL to now conduct a finer grain analysis of the operational costs, interior architectural feasibility, and financial investments required to commit limited resources appropriately. The CPL150: Community Vision Plan provides a road-map for actions worthy to celebrate in 2019 and beyond.

The CPL150 Community Vision Plan | Group 1 report includes recommendations for four initial branch communities:

  • Fleet Branch Slavic Village neighborhood
  • South Branch Clark-Fulton and Tremont neighborhoods
  • Sterling Branch Campus District and Central neighborhoods
  • Woodland Branch Central and Kinsman neighborhoods


The branches in the Community Vision Plan have been selected by CPL and their order of participation in the process has been determined through conversations with local public officials. The planning process is expected to be refined and expanded beyond this first group to include additional CPL branch neighborhoods.

Final recommendations for the current target neighborhoods were developed by the CUDC in close partnership with CPL and Enlightenment Consulting Group (ECG), through a carefully designed engagement process for each of the targeted branch locations. ECG’s previous work gathered feedback from residents that promote community building and address community deficits. Building upon this initial engagement process, the CUDC advanced the community conversations into the realm of physical planning. Gathering abundant feedback, the CUDC led 6 focus group sessions, 8 public meetings, 12 advisory committee meetings, and collected over 280 surveys in English and Spanish. In order to stay connected with people unable to attend meetings in person, the design team shared frequent updates on the process through a project website at www.CPL150.org.

The CPL150: Community Vision Plan articulates a wide-range of community priorities and reveals a clearer vision of the library’s role in each target area. Neighborhood asset maps, programming concepts, and visual renderings produced through this process enable CPL to now conduct a finer grain analysis of the operational costs, interior architectural feasibility, and financial investments required to commit limited resources appropriately.



CUDC Alumni ‘Branch Out’ at the Cleveland Botanical Gardens

The Cleveland Botanical Garden has a special exhibit on display called Branch Out. They invite you to explore a series of magical, interactive tree houses throughout the garden. Its a chance for kids (and adults) to put away technology and let their imagination run wild. Each tree house explores a theme connected to learning and fun including art, music, reading, math and play.

The tree houses were designed by local architects several of whom are CUDC alums. Two Teams of CUDC alums participated ThenDesign Architecture who built Jack and the Giant Pulpit and Sap +Iron Design|Build who built Acoustic Canopy and Seasons.

The team from ThenDesign Architecture included CUDC alums Wade Kratzer, Mia Katz, Claire Markwardt, Steve Bell, and Scott Alleman. Jeff Henderson of Ohio State University and Ed Parker of Kent State University were also on the team. We spoke with the team about their design,  Jack in the Giant Pulpit. Here is what they had to say about their design process and working with the Cleveland Botanical Gardens.

“We surround ourselves with design; it is our livelihood. All of us find ourselves in nature whether it’s exploring on our own, or designing within, so when the Cleveland Botanical Gardens released a Competition to design a Treehouse, it was something that we could not pass up. It combined the opportunity to design with nature in the most literal way. During the competition process, we challenged ourselves to understand what a treehouse was and what a treehouse could be. Is it a shelter? Is it a private getaway? Is it a platform to overlook nature? Could it be all of these and more?

Our love of nature skewed us to think of what nature is. How big in reality it is compared to humans and how our imagination always leads us to get lost within it. We began thinking of folk-lore and Science-Fiction and other childhood tall tales that involved nature. This led us to expand upon the tale of Jack and the Beanstalk, giving us the opportunity to work a Giant Jack in the Pulpit into the story, so that adults and children alike could have the opportunity to participate in the tale.”


The team from Sap + Iron Design|Build  consisted current and former CUDC students including Mykie Hrusovski, Alan Hipps, Jessie Hawkins, Adrian Marti, and Charles Fredrick who is an Assistant Professor and Interim Director of the Master of Landscape Architecture Program. Of the five projects that ultimately got selected for construction via a juried competition, two of their submissions were accepted. Of note, the jury was headed by Pete Nelson, the Tree House Master!

The houses each have a particular theme, Acoustic Canopy being a tree house that has built-in, bespoke musical instruments that encourages children to make and discover noises within the tree canopy, and Seasons being a small outdoor reading room for children. Both houses have a lot of custom details and features that were either planned from the beginning, or evolved as the project progressed. Another important note to emphasize is that Sap + Iron’s contractor was unable to commit to the project as it was beginning, so their team ended up constructing, rigging and installing everything by themselves.

acoustic canopy

Interesting facts:

  • The Acoustic Canopy project weighs well over 2.5 tons, and was lifted manually by only four people over the course of 2 days.
  • The tree that supports it is a Dawn Redwood which is a species thought to have gone extinct many millions of years ago, but was rediscovered and introduced to the U.S. only about 50 years ago as seeds and saplings. It’s already about 160′ tall.
  •  The Seasons Reading Room’s exterior is wrapped in Western Red Cedar that was hand-charred with a torch. This gives it its iridescent black color which serves a couple of purposes; a pleasing aesthetic, weather protection, rot resistance and insect repellency, (bugs don’t enjoy the taste of burnt wood).

We’re pleased to see our students working on such creative endeavors. The tree houses will be on display from now until August 23rd. Go out and explore the tree houses today!


CUDC welcomes a new office manager!


The CUDC would like to welcome our new office manager, Ellen Schneider. Prior to joining the CUDC, Ellen worked as an Advising Office Assistant for the College of Urban Affairs at Cleveland State University for three years. Ellen holds a B.A. in Classical and Medieval Studies from Cleveland State University and is currently pursuing a Master of Library and Information Sciences and a Master of Science in Information Architecture and Knowledge Management from Kent State University.

We are excited to have Ellen on our team and please contact her for any administrative inquiries.


Urban Agriculture in Cuba: film + talk


Please join us for a brown bag lunch talk with Cuban agronomist Isis Salcines along with a screening of the film, Tierralismo

This free event will take place at the CUDC (1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200) on May 27 from noon-1pm. Please bring your lunch–we’ll provide drinks and snacks.

About the film…

TIERRALISMO A film by Alejandro Ramirez Anderson

On the outskirts of Havana, sandwiched between highways and public housing, a revolution is taking place. Here, in the district of Alamar, a 26-acre farming co-op provides employment for dozens of workers, while producing vegetables and medicinal plants for the local community and beyond.

Following the collapse of the Soviet Bloc in the early 1990s, Cuba was no longer able to access machinery and agricultural chemicals from its former Communist allies. In this difficult environment, the government relaxed economic rules and allowed the formation of cooperatives like the Organopónico Vivero Alamar.

What began as necessity—farming without pesticides and chemical fertilizers—has become a source of pride to coop members. They fertilize with compost and cow manure, raise their own insects for biological pest control, and have even created a fully biodegradable alternative to the plastic bag for use with seedlings.

Tierralismo introduces us to everyone from agronomists and senior management to workers who plant, plow, and propagate. The film also covers non-farming aspects of the operation, such as human resources and accounting practices where transparency is paramount.

Lovingly photographed, TIERRALISMO offers a behind-the-scenes portrait of the Organopónico Vivero Alamar and a stirring defense of the importance of farm work and sustainable farming practices.


About the speaker…

Following the film, Isis Salcines, Projects Coordinator in the Projects and Investments Office at the Organoponico, will give a presentation about her work. Ms. Salcines holds an advanced studies degree in Agricultural Engineering and has been with Organoponico since 1998. During her time at the cooperative, she has launched a new food preservation project and has focused on the marketing and distribution of local organic produce to domestic and international markets.

For more information about the event, please contact the CUDC here.


EASTSIDE HUB multi-family living for a multicultural population


Congratulations to Kent State CUDC graduate student Alena Miller who took 3rd place in the 2015 Cleveland State University Real Estate Market Analysis Competition. Alena competed in a field of 20 students. Her project focused on the design of a community to support an influx of immigrants and refugees, in accordance with resettlement criteria outlined by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Using a site in Cleveland (E. 61 Street, just south of Chester Avenue) she developed a plan for 180 apartment units plus 156,000 SF of urban agriculture. The inclusion of  urban farming generated 25 on-site jobs for the refugee community.

PowerPoint Presentation

Alena’s project is especially timely, given the large and growing numbers of people who are forced to flee their homelands each year due to political conflicts and violence. Greater Cleveland receives approximately 600-700 refugees a yeara number that could grow if planning, policies, and programs are in place to support these populations.

Her work represents a unique investment opportunity that advocates for the future of Cleveland. Congratulations, Alena!


design/REbuild summer course announced!

flyer_header The CUDC’s design/REbuild program argues that design brings value, and may help others re-envision the possibilities for Cleveland’s undervalued housing stock. Cleveland loses thousands of houses to demolition every year. Can new design and construction ideas breathe life back into some of these houses?

In 2014 a 3rd year architecture studio led by Chris Maurer examined design possibilities for radically renovating an existing vacant brick house. At the end of the semester, the ideas were consolidated into a final construction document set and submitted to the City for permitting. Over the summer CAED/CAEST students worked on-site every afternoon to realize their collective design vision. Then, this spring, our 2nd year Interior Design students proposed ideas for the house interior.

In Summer of 2015, we’re returning to the house to finish construction with the aim of selling it in the fall and using the funds to renovate another house in 2016. And we’re looking for students to join us.

This program invites CAED/CAEST students to get on-site and renovate a house from start to finish. Make thoughtful, creative design decisions during the process and learn about the relationship of architecture, interior design, and construction with your own hands.

Course Details:

SESSION 1: June 8 – July 11 | ARCH 46922-001

SESSION 2: July 13 – August 15 | ARCH 46922-002

Both sessions are 3 Field Study credits. The courses will be held on-site at the house, 1045 E 67th St, in the St Clair-Superior neighborhood of Cleveland. Class meets Monday through Friday from 1:00-6:15 PM every day. It is the students’ responsibility to get to and from the site. As of now, we project that Session 1 will be primarily framing, insulation, drywall, floor refinishing; Session 2 will be more finish work (painting, trimwork, casework, and landscaping). That said, there is no guarantee of precisely what students will be doing on a day-to-day basis – a willing attitude and flexibility are essential.

Construction experience is more than welcome, but not a necessity. Basic tools will be required from each student: workboots, hardhat, safety glasses, gloves, measuring tape, square, utility knife, hammer, toolbelt, etc. Other tools and supplies are helpful but can be provided.

Housing: We know many Kent students have difficulty commuting to and from Cleveland every afternoon. Potentially, session-long neighborhood housing may be available at the Slovenian National Home (6417 St Clair Ave), but they currently have outstanding construction needs before apartments are ready. As a result, if any student is interested in Cleveland housing in the neighborhood of the design/REbuild house, please get in touch with Kristen Zeiber (kzeiber[at]kent.edu] NO LATER THAN APRIL 10th. If enough students are interested, this gives the Slovenian National Home time to finish apartment preparation. Rent is still in negotiations, but likely to be low – ~$150-$200 per student per 5-week session.

Questions? If you have any further questions please reach out to Kristen Zeiber via email: kzeiber[at]kent.edu; and check out the program website here.


Spring Lecture Series | Dr. Xinyue Ye


Join us Friday, April 3rd, as we welcome Dr. Xinyue Ye to our Spring Lecture Series. His talk will focus on the introduction of several research tools for spatiotemporal modeling and analytics of social media data, such as information diffusion modeling over time and space, the connection between online activities and real world human behaviors, and new knowledge discovery tools. Some case studies on disaster and public health will be demonstrated.

Dr. Xinyue Ye’s research focuses on space-time analytics development, implementation, and application in the context of big social data and urban/regional science. His work won the national first-place award of “research and analysis” from the US University Economic Development Association in 2011 and he received the emerging scholar award from AAG’s Regional Development and Planning Specialty Group in 2012. He has co-edited eight journal special issues and about 60 journal articles on fostering the interaction of space-time analytics research and socioeconomic dynamics studies. Dr. Ye’s research emphasizes that the application of space-time analytics sheds new light on socioeconomic dynamics research while research questions from socioeconomic dynamics studies push the frontier of space-time analytics innovation.

Dr. Ye is the founding director of Computational Social Science Lab at Kent State University since 2013. Recent and current main federal research projects include University Center Program (Department of Commerce), Coastal Ohio Wind (Department of Energy), Comparative Space-Time Dynamics (National Science Foundation), and Spatiotemporal Modeling of Human Dynamics Across Social Media and Social Networks (National Science Foundation). Since 2011, he serves as Associate Editor of Stochastic Environmental Research & Risk Assessment, a leading SCI journal in spatial statistical modeling.

As always our lectures are free and open to the public. Join us from 12-1 PM on Friday, April 3rd,  from 12-1 PM, at the CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200, Cleveland, OH 44115.



Rooms to Let: CLE | Call for Artist


Built upon the overwhelming success of the inaugural Rooms to Let: Cleveland last year, the innovative event will return to the Slavic Village neighborhood on Saturday, May 16th and Sunday, May 17th, 2015. Artists will create a temporary art exhibition using vacant homes as their medium. The event, free and open to the public, will also include a neighborhood block party with live music, hands-on art activities and local food purveyors.

Led by Slavic Village Development, Rooms to Let: Cleveland seeks to continue the conversation around vacancy and the plight of Cleveland’s historic neighborhoods in the wake of the foreclosure crisis. This year’s event will expand this dialogue to a new group of visual and performance artists to further interpret the evolution of community and recovery.

Interested artists should apply here. The deadline for submissions is March 20, 2015.

Rooms To Let: Cleveland is supported in part by the residents of Cuyahoga County through a public grant from Cuyahoga Arts & Culture.

Slavic Village Development is an entrepreneurial non-profit neighborhood redevelopment organization serving the Broadway Slavic Village neighborhood of Cleveland with over 30 years of experience in community development.


Spring Lecture Series | Mary Ann Lasch, FASLA, LEED AP


This week our featured guest speaker will be Mary Ann Lasch. Mary Ann is the Program Manager for Planning and Landscape Architecture at AECOM. If you have never joined us for our Spring Lecture Series, but have always been curious, this is one that you are not going to want to miss.

Mary Ann will be speaking about inspiration and the almost unlimited range of possibilities and opportunities for landscape architects.

Mary Ann Lasch is both an accomplished landscape architect with experience in design, planning, project management, and environmental advocacy; and an organization development consultant with expertise in process facilitation, change management, and strategic planning. Her landscape architecture and planning career includes work for architecture firms, real estate developers, national planning agencies, and major corporations.

With this broad experience she understands and addresses planning issues from all sides. Mary Ann establishes clear, realistic, and actionable strategies for planning and real estate development projects worldwide. She then creates land use plans and regulations, master plans, guidebooks, and implementation programs to ensure that development and conservation strategies can be implemented. She has more than twenty years of experience in building group consensus and facilitating large groups for a broad range of public and private sector clients.

As always our lectures are free and open to the public. Join us from 12-1 PM on Friday, March 6th, at the CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200, Cleveland, OH 44115.

*Due to the overwhelming response of our past lectures we are asking that people RSVP so that we can accurately prepare for the number of people attending. Please RSVP here or at cudc[at]kent.edu.

Mary Ann Lasch, FASLA, LEED AP


Uptown District finalist for Rudy Bruner Award


The 2015 Rudy Bruner Award selection committee met last weekend in Cambridge to review applications from 40 communities in 26 states, and selected five finalist, among them was Cleveland’s Uptown District.

The Uptown District is the redevelopment of a corridor linking art, educational and health care institutions with surrounding neighborhoods, creating outdoor gathering spaces, retail shops and restaurants, student and market-rate housing, and public transit connections.

Congratulations on such a prestigious honor! Stay tuned to late May/early June when the medalists are announced.


Main Avenue Bridge | Underpass Improvement Competition


Downtown Cleveland Alliance seeks a creative professional or team (architect, designer, artist, engineer, landscape architect or combination thereof) to propose unique and attractive design solutions for the area under and around the Main Avenue Bridge Underpass, centered at the intersection of West 9th Street and Main Avenue in Downtown Cleveland. This location is a critical pedestrian, bicycle, and vehicular connection between the Warehouse District and the Flats East Bank, with infrastructure, history, and functional potential to inspire the highest level of creative treatments.

The CUDC recently worked with the Downtown Cleveland Alliance to complete a strategic planning process to create a holistic vision and tactical plan for improving the physical connectivity of Downtown Cleveland. The resulting plan, Step Up Downtown, enumerates eighteen (18) key connections where real or perceived gaps or barriers impede the experience of Downtown Cleveland as continuous and traversable.

This is an open Request for Qualifications (RFQ) from established creative professionals based anywhere in North America who are interested in a highly visible and impactful project in Downtown Cleveland, Ohio. Click here to view full submissions details and criteria.

CLE Main Avenue Bridge Underpass Improvement Competition_2

CLE Main Avenue Bridge Underpass Improvement Competition

Please submit materials on or before March 6th, 2015 at 4:30pm. Questions may be addressed to Laura Kushnick Wiegand, Director of Development & Community Relations, at 216-325-0975 or lwiegand@dowtowncleveland.org, or to Thomas Starinsky, Associate Director of the Historic Warehouse District Development Corporation, at tstarinsky@warehousedistrict.org, or 216-325-0937.