10-25-19

OUTprint / INprint: What does dignity mean?

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Tour and presentation by Malaz Elgemiabby
October 31, 2019 | 9-10 AM
Riverview Welcome Center, 1701 West 25th Street, Cleveland

MALAZ

Malaz Elgemiabby, a Cleveland-based design consultant from Sudan, will discuss a public art project highlighting the potential of a future park overlooking the Cuyahoga River and the downtown skyline at Irishtown Bend.  The Welcome Center, used for more than a decade as a storage facility, is just north of CMHA’s Riverview apartments.

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Planners envision turning the one-story, gable-roofed building into a gateway for the proposed 17-acre park at Irishtown Bend that will take shape on a weed-covered slope downhill, once occupied by 19th-century Irish immigrant laborers.

Malaz’s project grew out of her participation in the Cleveland Foundation’s Creative Fusion program, which engages local and international artists in creative ventures in Cleveland. The project, completed in partnership with LAND Studio, is a local manifestation of a global initiative launched by the French photographer known as JR, who plasters large black-and-white photographs on buildings to broadcast the identity of participants. The work grew out of extensive community discussions in Ohio City.

This event is free and open to the public. More information: cudc@kent.edu | 216.357.3434

 

 

10-24-19

BAT CAMP: ASLA Student Award Winner!

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Congratulations to Katherine Kelleher, 2019 Graduate of Kent State’s Master of Landscape Architecture Program, for her Student Merit Award from the Ohio Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects. Her advisor on the project was Dr. Reid Coffman.

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The Indiana Bat is an endangered species in Ohio. Their population has significantly declined since the mid 1970s and continues to struggle. There are many factors for this including habitat loss and the detrimental fungal disease known as White Nose Syndrome. Bat Camp creates a space mutually beneficial for all. The structures create a habitat which supports life and prosperity at Acacia Reservation in Lyndhurst, Ohio. Katherine’s design addresses and enhances the broader ecosystem including plant and animal life.

The Indiana Bat is a hibernating species. From about mid-October to mid-March the Indiana Bat will hibernate in limestone caves in Ohio and adjacent states. The fungus of White Nose Syndrome unfortunately lives in these caves. The bats can contract the fungus here or from contact with infected bats. Starting in about mid-March the bats will emerge from the caves and start heading towards their spring and summer time roosts.

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Existing conditions at Acacia Reservation are accommodating to the Indiana Bat. The ecologically patchy environment provides diversity for habitat. The Indiana Bat likes to forage down long, open corridors. The wet meadows are part of a network of wet depressions and established wetlands which host diverse aquatic insects that the bat will feed on. The typical trees that host the Indiana Bat are typically along forest edges near water, or in open fields. The scale of the reservation provides several spaces for the bat to meet their daily needs.

The structure’s design is flexible and constantly changing. Layers of untreated wood become more habitable as it decays, opening up more space to occupy. The roosting spaces from the decay will come naturally – but there is flexibility to adjust the design to manually beat up the wood before being added to the structure to give faster habitability. The design is simple and responsive, allowing adjustments and change every season to better accommodate the bats.

The structure’s interior is built with copper. Copper has antimicrobial properties that radiate to adjacent material. This gesture is an attempt to slow down the spread of White Nose Syndrome. Additionally, the copper becomes an ideal hanging space for the bats once the wood has decayed enough.

Katherine conducted a series of sun studies to demonstrate the dynamic changes that the structures go through during season change and time change. Indiana Bats are especially particular to temperature. The scale, and multiple roosting options allow the bats to have ample choices to move around for ideal comfort and temperature.

Bat Camp uses ecomimicry to create a space for cohabitation at Acacia. This shared space is beneficial for the Indiana Bat, plant life, pollinators, people, and more. The design is adaptable from year to year, with the goal of becoming more mutually beneficial for all with each passing year.

10-17-19

2019 Graduate Programs Open House

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Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design presents
2019 Graduate Programs Open House | November 2, 2019

Explore graduate education at Kent State University College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED). Whether you’re beginning a new career path or you have it already in place—learn about attaining your next level of education!

The CAED offers a wide array of graduate programs in architecture (including two unique dual-degree programs), urban design, construction management, healthcare design, landscape architecture, and graduate-level research in environmental design. Join us to learn more about all our graduate programs, meet faculty, staff, and students. You are welcome to visit the Kent campus and the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative facilities. You can choose to attend both locations or just one. Reimbursement for designated parking is available.

Saturday, November 2, 2019

Kent State University
Center for Architecture and Environmental Design
132 South Lincoln Street, Kent OH 44240
Room 120 (Cene Lecture Hall)

9:00 am – 10:00 am | Registration
10:00 am – 10:30 am | Welcome and all CAED Program Introductions
10:30 am–11:30 pm | Program Breakout Sessions – 20 minutes each
11:30 am – 12:00 pm | Tour of the Center for Architecture and Environmental Design
11:30 am – 12:30 pm | Lunch [provided]

Cleveland Studios and CUDC
1309 Euclid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44115
1:30 pm – 3:00 pm | Tour and presentation in Cleveland: Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Urban Design

REGISTRATION | MORE INFORMATION

10-17-19

Building Youth Power In Cities

 

Image credit: Cody Rouge & Warrendale Neighborhood Framework Investigators (HECTOR, Rodney Bridges, Marnesha Davenport, Khadijah Harris, Taylin Hodges, Skylah Pounds, Mouley Yusef Sabour, LaKendra Reynolds-Smith, Lillie Reynolds-Smith, Alexcia Stoner)

How are design & planning professionals collaborating with young people to build cities for the future?

Please join us for a special event celebrating five years of the CUDC’s Making Our Own Space program.

Tuesday, November 19, 2019 | 6:30 PM
Shaker Heights Public Library, 16500 Van Aken Boulevard

The event will include the release of a new guide to youth engagement and community design, inspired by the projects created by Cleveland area students through Making Our Own Space.

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It will also include a presentation by Jae Shin and Damon Rich entitled, Building Youth Power in Cities: Newark/Detroit/Cleveland at tha Crossroads. Jae and Damon are urban designers at HECTOR in Newark, New Jersey. They will discuss the triumphs and frustrations of inter-generational work to make change and build things in Newark, Philadelphia, and Detroit.

Free and open to the public. All ages are welcome. Refreshments will be served. REGISTER HERE

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This event is made possible through the generous support of The Saint Luke’s Foundation.

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Co-sponsored by APA Ohio. AICP Certification Maintenance credits (CM: 1.5 hours) available for certified planners.

Image credit: Cody Rouge & Warrendale Neighborhood Framework Investigators (HECTOR, Rodney Bridges, Marnesha Davenport, Khadijah Harris, Taylin Hodges, Skylah Pounds, Mouley Yusef Sabour, LaKendra Reynolds-Smith, Lillie Reynolds-Smith, Alexcia Stoner)

09-20-19

Lunch Lecture at the CUDC

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Please join us for a lecture with Dominic Mathew of the Fund for Our Economic Future at noon on Wednesday, September 25 in the CUDC gallery.

For decades, industrial, commercial and residential development has migrated outward, but there has been no net increase in jobs or population to substantiate the regional spread. The result: Jobs are farther and farther away from where people live, which creates a disconnect between people and the economy. The disconnect exacerbates racial inequities, limits economic mobility, harms the region’s businesses, and diminishes the overall health of our economy. At the same time, we’re seeing an explosion of transportation solutions around the country, including ride-sharing, ride-hailing, van-pooling, and on-demand services. We are no longer living in a world where transportation options need to be limited by the choice between individualized car ownership or a traditional bus. This summer, the Fund for Our Economic Future, in conjunction with the National Fund for Workforce Solutions, Greater Cleveland Partnership, Cuyahoga County, The Lozick Family Foundation, the Cleveland Foundation, and DriveOhio, launched The Paradox Prize, a $1 million, multi-year challenge to invest in big ideas that help Northeast Ohioans stranded economically by their geography connect to tens of thousands of open positions. Learn more about this effort and some of the solutions that are being surfaced and tested through this initiative.

This lecture is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided and you’re welcome to bring your lunch. Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative is located at 1309 Euclid Avenue, on the second floor. Ring the intercom next to the front door to be buzzed in. For more information, call 216.357.3434 or email cudc@kent.edu.

09-12-19

ZeroThreshold Awards Event

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Celebrating winning entries from the ZeroThreshold, an international design competition for accessible housing. Hosted by North Coast Community Homes and sponsored by the Cleveland Foundation.

September 19, 2019 at 5:30 PM
Ariel International Event Center, 1163 East 40th Street, Cleveland

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Featuring a keynote address by architect Chris Downey.
Tickets available at ZeroThreshold.org

09-12-19

Collective Reality: Image without Ownership

Collective Reality

An Interactive augmented reality installation that engages citizens in imagining the Future of the Urban Environment.

A project by EXTENTS, stock-a-studio, and Mark Linquist.
Opening on Saturday, September 14, 5-8PM
5324 Fleet Avenue, Cleveland

09-12-19

NEGOTIATING BODIES

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Can urban design help facilitate democratic processes? Political theories around Agonism describe the identification and negotiation of conflicts as a way to move towards a radical and diverse new democratic system. This new system arises from accepting that each individual in the system has multiple subjectivities, thus is able to create multiple political negotiated bodies. In this talk these theories will be used as a frame to look at professional and academic urban design work by Quilian Riano, founder of DSGN AGNC and new Associate Director of the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative.

Wednesday, September 18, 2019 from noon-1pm
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, Kent State University
1309 Euclid Avenue, 2nd Floor | Cleveland

Quilian

Please join us in welcoming Quilian to Cleveland and the CUDC!  This event is free and open to the public. You’re welcome to bring your lunch and snacks will be served. For more information: 216.357.3434 or cudc@kent.edu.

 

07-05-19

AIA Speakers on the Square

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AIA Cleveland presents, Speakers on the Square, in partnership with #SustainableCLE and APG Office Furnishings.

July 8 at 5:30 pm
APG Office Furnishings, 2516 Detroit Avenue

Panelists include Patrick Kearns of Ohio City Farm/The Refugee Response; Daniel Brown of Rust Belt Riders, and Jacob VanSickle of Bike Cleveland. The conversation will be moderated by Leah Ratner from the Cleveland Clinic.
Complementary Food and drink.

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07-05-19

Ballpark: Baseball in the American City

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Pulitzer Prize-winning architecture critic Paul Goldberger’s new book, Ballpark, is an exhilarating, splendidly illustrated look at the history of baseball told through the stories of the vibrant and ever-changing ballparks where the game was and is staged.

He will be in Cleveland at the Jukebox Courtyard, 1404 W. 29th Street, for a conversation on Monday, July 8 at 5:30pm. This event is free and open to the public.

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06-28-19

Designing for Dignity

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Is inequity hardwired into the design of our neighborhoods, homes and public buildings? If so, could equity and dignity be woven back in by placing people at the heart of the design process? Enterprise Community Partners is pleased to host John Cary at Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland (11400 Euclid Avenue) for a public keynote and conversation about how design can be used as a force for social change.
An architect by training, John has devoted his career to expanding the practice of design for the public good. His new book is called Design for Good: A New Era of Architecture for Everyone and the subject of his new TED talk, How architecture can create dignity for all.
Cocktail reception begins at 6pm | Keynote begins at 7pm
Free and open to the public.

REGISTER

 

06-11-19

Squidsoup on the Detroit-Superior Bridge

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Join us on the streetcar level of the Detroit Superior Bridge on from 10am-11pm on June 22, 2019!

The CUDC is working with UK-based arts group, Squidsoup on two immersive lighting installations for the bridge. Squidsoup’s work in Cleveland is supported by the Creative Fusion program at the Cleveland Foundation. The project is part of Cuyahoga50, a celebration of 50 years of progress since the last time the Cuyahoga River caught fire in 1969.

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The Squidsoup installations include Ascendance at the center span of the bridge, where visitors will be surrounded by light and directly over the river; and Cuyahoga Flow at the eastern end of the bridge, where waves of light will illuminate the remarkable subterranean architecture of the historic subway tunnels.

This is also an opportunity to learn more about planning efforts for the streetcar level of the bridge and offer your ideas about how the space can be improved for public use. Look for the large displays at both ends of the bridge and share your thoughts.

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The event is free and open to all ages. Visitors must wear flat shoes, bring a photo ID, and sign a waiver to enter the bridge. You can sign the waiver on site, or complete it in advance here: BRIDGE WAIVER. No ID is required for children under 18, though a parent or guardian will need to sign a waiver on their behalf.

As part of Cuyahoga50, the RTA will be free all day, so plan to catch a bus or a train to the bridge. The Settlers Landing Station of the RTA Waterfront Line stops near the eastern entrance to the bridge. Bus lines on Superior Avenue and West 25th Street stop near the western entrance.

For more information: cudc@kent.edu or 216.357.3434

 

06-06-19

Worship of Water Dance Ensemble

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On June 19, 2019 from 8-11pm, the Worship of Water Dance Ensemble will be performing on the streetcar level of the Detroit Superior Bridge. This performance is part of a special preview night for the Cuyahoga50 Celebration and the first opportunity to see an immersive lighting installation by UK-based artists, Squidsoup. The preview event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. REGISTER HERE

The Worship of Water is an exploration of the spiritual rituals in honoring water. The Orisha deity Yemoja or Yemayá, is honored by the Yoruba people of Nigeria and those who practice Yoruba and Santeria across Brazil, the Caribbean and the Americas. Yemoja is the deity of water, femininity, and the protector of women and children. She is honored in celebrations through dance, altars, spoken word, and rituals.

The Worship of Water is an attempt to learn from the practice of honoring water so that we may develop a healthier relationship to our waterways. Yemoja serves as our reminder to re-connect with water and to remember what an important role it plays in our daily life. We dance on the edge of one of the largest bodies of freshwater on our planet. May we embrace the responsibility to care for water so that it can provide us with life for future generations to come. Many hands, minds, and spirits who shaped this work, including Parade the Circle staff at the Cleveland Museum of Art who provided an encouraging presence in guiding this project. Thank you to those among us who honor Yemoja and honor water, so we may approach the next 50 years caring for our lakes and rivers with admiration and respect.

05-24-19

PechaKucha Night: Waterways

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On June 20th, 2019, Cleveland will kick off a weekend of celebration with PechaKucha Night: Waterways, a groundbreaking global event featuring presentations from thought leaders from around the world!

Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative is a community partner and we hope you will join us at the event.

Taking place at Jacobs Pavilion at Nautica on the banks of the Cuyahoga almost 50 years to the day of the Cuyahoga River’s last burning, the free event will highlight clean water issues in an exciting, format appealing to those who love creativity, those who love clean water, and all those who love Cleveland.

Presenters from Ethiopia, Uganda, Lebanon, Vancouver, Minneapolis, Detroit, and Cleveland leverage the rapid-fire PechaKucha format to share diverse perspectives on how communities around the world can re-think their relationship with the world’s more important resource. The beauty of the PechaKucha presentation is its concise format: each speaker presents only 20 images and each image is timed to 20 seconds.

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Taraneh Meshkani, Assistant Professor in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State will be one of the presenters. She will talk about the work of our graduate students in a recent studio which focused on reclaiming urban riverfront sites in Cleveland; Beirut, Lebanon; and Medellin, Colombia.

This event is 100% free and open to the public due through the generous support of the Cleveland Foundation and partnership with LAND Studio. Reserve your ticket today at: https://globalpkn.com/

We hope that you us for this unique evening filled with diverse perspectives. Together, let’s celebrate #Cuyahoga50!

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05-17-19

Community Design Charrette: Call for Proposals

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Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative is looking for a city, suburb, town, or neighborhood that is facing an urban design challenge and needs fresh ideas and perspectives. The CUDC will select one community to be the focus of an intensive community design charrette to be held in October of 2019.

The ideal community partner will be a government agency or other vested stakeholder with the potential ability to realize some of the recommendations that emerge during the charrette process. The partner will also be responsible for basic food and lodging for approximately 30 students and staff over a 3-4 day charrette period. The CUDC will bring drawing supplies and expertise.

The CUDC is accepting proposals from communities within about a three-hour radius of Cleveland, as highlighted on the map below. Any community–large or small–is welcome to submit a proposal for the charrette. Major cities are shown on the map for reference.

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What is a Community Design Charrette?
A charrette is an intensive, multi-day planning session where residents, local stakeholders, elected officials, designers collaborate on a vision for future development and public improvements. Recent charrettes have focused on the revitalization of Toledo’s Junction Neighborhood (executive summary and final slideshow); the removal and redevelopment of a section of the Akron Innerbelt; and public space and transportation improvements in Downtown Youngstown.

The community design charrette is a rewarding experience for students who get an opportunity to tackle real-world design challenges and propose solutions. Our partner communities gain a wide range of design and planning ideas in a short and intense period of time.

About the CUDC
The CUDC is the outreach division for the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State University. Based in downtown Cleveland, the professional staff of the CUDC work with communities throughout Northeast Ohio and beyond on a wide range of urban design and planning projects. The CUDC is co-located with the College’s graduate programs in urban design, landscape architecture, and architecture. The Community Design Charrette teams these graduate students with CUDC staff to to tackle a project proposed by a community partner.

The CUDC partners with other design schools, including Lawrence Technological University’s College of Architecture and Design in Detroit, Ball State University’s Urban Design Center in Indianapolis, and the University at Buffalo to bring their graduate students to the selected community for the charrette.

PROPOSAL
Please send a proposal of no more than two pages, introducing your community its particular design challenges and opportunities, along with any other information to help us understand the needs of your community. Maps and photos are welcome, in addition to your two-page proposal. All proposal materials should be combined into a single PDF and emailed to cudc@kent.edu.

TIMELINE

  • June 17, 2019: Deadline to submit your proposal
  • June 30, 2019: Selection of charrette community
  • Early-mid October, 2019: Community design charrette in selected community

 

 

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DELIVERABLES for the PARTNER COMMUNITY

Students and staff will produce a series of analytical drawings, diagrams, renderings, design guidelines, and other relevant planning & urban design graphics, to be presented to the community partner at the end of the Charrette period. Following the Charrette, CUDC staff will assemble the design proposals into a final report and presentation to be delivered to the community partner by the end of 2019.

QUESTIONS?
Contact the CUDC at cudc@kent.edu or 216.357.3434