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Mark Linder Lecture & Exhibition | October 19-23

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We welcome Mark Linder as he presents a special gallery exhibition and talk titled, American City 2.5. The exhibition will be on display October 19-21, 9 am – 5 pm and October 22-23, 9 am – 12 pm. Mark will give a talk about the installation on October 21 at 12 pm. Both the exhibition and the gallery talk will be held at the CUDC. Following Mark’s gallery talk at the CUDC, he will be speaking at Kent State University’s Schwartz Center 177 at 6:30 pm.

Exhibition: On display October 19-21, 9 am – 5 pm and October 22-23, 9 am – 12 pm
Gallery Talk: October  21 @ 12:00 noon, CUDC
“American City 2.5”
American City 2.5 explores the imaging capacities of geographic information systems (GIS) as a mode of urban design. It is the most recent in a series of GIS projects that began in 2001 as transdisciplinary research on the differing capabilities, spatial logics, and disciplinary bases of GIS and CAD software. This project exploits the geo-processing and graphic capacities of GIS to transform the discrete categories and boundaries of census and municipal data into pliable, even plastic, relational images that can suggest new spatial networks, gaps, intensities, densities, and affiliations. We propose a hybridized, cross-programmed, and more efficient public services network that combines the scales, infrastructures, operations, programs, and constituencies of four underfunded, atrophying public institutions -schools, libraries, post offices, and bus transit- in the context of hydrology and economy. Our imaging techniques aspire to manifest dissensual and differential space in which “the people” does not consist of individual data points in a census of the population, and citizens are not units of demographic categorization or subjects in a policed domain of information. Rather, the people are reformulated as relative, unstable, and latent communities in an improper spatial mapping of an amalgamated, networked public institution.

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Kent State University Lecture: Wednesday, October 21 @ 6:30 PM, Schwartz Center 177 
“The New Brutal: Images, Mies and the Smithsons”
What might architectural practice become if its primary means and ends were images? Imaging is a field of inquiry and possibility with fundamental challenges for architecture today. It is also a field with a history in architecture, and a clear beginning in the work and ideas of the New Brutalist architects affiliated with the Independent Group of 1950s Britain, most famously theorized by Reyner Banham as topological “image-making.” The New Brutal is increasingly pertinent in today’s world of dense, instantaneous, superficial actualities which are as prevalent, and as necessary to grapple with, in architecture’s production, reception and dissemination as in any other field.

Mark Linder is a Professor of Architecture at Syracuse University, where he has chaired the graduate programs, coordinated the New York City program, and served as Chancellor’s Fellow in the Humanities. His research pursues design theory and history considered in a transdisciplinary framework and is focused on modern architecture since 1950. He is the author of Nothing Less than Literal: Architecture after Minimalism (MIT 2004) and is currently at work on a book titled That’s Brutal, What’s Modern? on the alternative mid-century modernisms, or Miesianisms, of Alison and Peter Smithson, Walter Segal, John Hejduk, and others. He has taught as a visiting professor at the University of Michigan, Harvard, University of Illinois-Chicago, Rice University, IIT, RISD, and UCLA.

His most recent work explores the potential of image studies for architecture. As Chancellor’s Fellow in the Humanities (2011-14) he taught a seminar and organized an event series, titled IMAGES?Precisely!, which focused on the ways that the precise analysis, application, and understanding of images invite innovative research methods and collaborations, and promise to shuffle the presumed territories, limits, affiliations, and purposes of academic fields. A website, imagesproject.org documents the results of that work.

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