02-29-16

Ohio History Fund / New Life for Old Houses

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The Ohio History Fund supports innovative historic preservation projects across the state. Please consider donating to the Fund. It’s easy. Just look for “Ohio History Fund” on your Ohio tax return and designate a dollar amount. That’s it! Your tax-deductible donation goes to support history projects in local Ohio communities.

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The Ohio History Fund is a generous sponsor of the CUDC’s soon-to-be released publication, New Life for Old Homes. This guide contains ideas and advice for rehabbing vacant and abandoned housing that might otherwise be demolished. It includes recommendations and lessons-learned from Kent State University’s first design re/Build project—a beautiful reclaimed home at 1045 E. 67th Street in Cleveland’s St, Clair Superior neighborhood. The renovations to the design re/Build house were designed and implemented by undergraduate students from the KSU’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design, with the help of dozens of community volunteers. We’re currently completing the final punch list and the house is available for sale. Contact us at cudc[at]kent.edu if you’re interested in this very special property.

And look for the release of New Life for Old Homes later this spring.

02-22-16

Doug Steidl Lecture | February 26

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This Friday, February 26th at noon, we welcome Doug Steidl, Dean of the Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design. Doug’s talk, “International Travel and Lessons Learned”, will emphasize that learning about and understanding cultural subtleties, and some not so subtle, will facilitate both practical aspects for relationship building and a broader understanding of global perspectives.Doug3

Mr. Steidl was a practicing architect for 35 years. He was a founding partner of Braun & Steidl Architects in Akron, Ohio, a position he held from 1983 to 2007. Before joining Kent State, he served as manager of Renard, LLC, an investment, development and consulting company. His career also includes working at John David Jones & Associates as designer, project manager and director of architecture; the U.S. Navy Civil Engineering Corps; Allegheny County Redevelopment Authority in Pittsburgh, PA; and the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company. Over the course of his career, he was elected National President of the American Institute of Architects, and served as President of the National Architectural Accrediting Board. Mr. Steidl is a Registered Architect with the State of Ohio (23 jurisdictions previously).

The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.

 

02-08-16

Felipe Correa Lecture | February 11

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This week we will be holding our Spring Lecture Series on Thursday, February 11th, at 12:15 PM, here at the CUDC. We welcome architect, urbanist, and Harvard Associate Professor, Felipe Correa. Felipe’s talk, “Urbanism Primer: Approaches to City Design in the 21st Century”, will provide an overview of the most salient modes of practice currently being applied to the contemporary city. By presenting a series of projects that range in scale and ambition, the lecture showcases the rich instrumental diversity afforded by design and its ability to confront diverse urban scenarios.

correa__mex_strategiesProject Constellation for Mexico City. From Mexico City: Between Geometry and Geography. Courtesy of Felipe Correa

Felipe Correa is Associate Professor in the Department of Urban Planning and Design and Director of the Urban Design Degree Program at Harvard University. A New York-based architect and urbanist, Correa works at the confluence of Architecture, Urbanism and Infrastructure. Through his design practice, Somatic Collaborative, he has developed design projects and consultancies with the public and private sector in multiple cities and regions across the globe, including Mexico City, New Orleans, Quito, Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Seoul among many others.

If you can’t make it to our afternoon lecture, Felipe will be also speaking at the Kent State University Main Campus, Kiva Auditorium at 6:00 PM, Thursday, February 11th. His lecture is titled, “Elective Affinities: Architecture Across Scales”. Both are free and open to the public.

 

02-02-16

Casey Poe | February 5

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Join us this Friday, February 5th, at noon for our Spring Lecture Series. We will be welcoming MArch + MUD student, Casey Poe, for an interesting talk from the student perspective. She will be talking about her experiences as a student in Florence, Italy during the Fall 2015 semester. She will be sharing her travels, living in Florence and the ways in which she grew to understand the city within multiple contextual scales: from the larger European scale (in conjunction with her field study trips) down to the scale of her individual experience in finding a home in Florence.

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Casey Poe is in her first year of the Masters of Architecture and Urban Design dual degree program. She grew up east of Cleveland, but completed my Bachelor of Arts in Architecture from Ball State University in Indiana. The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.

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01-27-16

Call for Ideas: COLDSCAPES//Adapt

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Registration is now open!

COLDSCAPES//Adapt seeks submissions that respond to challenges posed by volatile weather conditions in winter cities.

 
Entrants should provide an effective visual (and potentially aural, if using video) presentation of a built project or conceptual proposal that responds to the following design concerns:

  • How can the built environment quickly respond to changing weather conditions?
  • What design strategies can enable more adaptable buildings, public spaces, and urban infrastructure?
  • How can cities embrace and express indeterminacy, while maintaining a high quality of life for its residents?
  • What insights from winter cities can be applied to the challenges of increased variability and volatility caused by global climate change?
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    red square2013 COLDSCAPES Competition winning entry Second Hinterlands, Noel Turgeon and Natalya Egon

    This year’s call for entries builds on the previous COLDSCAPES Competition, which brought significant attention to three winning projects and ten honorable mentions. Propelled by the competition, one of the winners, The Freezeway by Matt Gibbs, recently opened as a pilot project in Edmonton, Canada.

    edmonton freezewayPhoto of the built Edmonton Freezeway pilot project, a 2013 COLDSCAPES competition winner. (photo credit: Heather Dailey)

    Three winning entries will be selected by the jury to receive awards:

  • $500 First Place
  • $300 Second Place
  • $200 Third Place
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    Learn more and register for the competition at Coldscapes.org.

    The registration fee is $10 per team. Registration ends on February 12, 2016 and the submission deadline is Friday, February 19th at 6pm EST.

    2_fullpagePOLAR 77 by Wendy Wang and Ryan Ort, selected as one of three winning projects in the 2013 COLDSCAPES Competition 

    Competition winners will be announced at Brite Winter in Cleveland on February 20th. The announcement will take place following a public talk by COLDSCAPES//Adapt juror Sergio Lopez-Pineiro. The talk is free and open to the public, beginning at 3pm. Learn more about the event and RSVP here.

    The COLDSCAPES competition and public event are organized by Kent State University’s Center for Outdoor Living Design (COLD) in partnership with Brite Winter, with generous support from Ohio Arts Council.

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    01-21-16

    2016 Spring Lecture Series kicks off with Rick Espe of MKSK

    Spring Lecture Poster_template Join us Friday, January 29th, for our first lecture of the spring semester. We welcome Rick Espe, Principal at MKSK as he will discuss “Transforming the Columbus Riverfront”. This will trace MKSK’s work on the Columbus Riverfront over the past 25-years. From the Riverfront Vision Plan, through specific projects – North Bank Park, Scioto Audubon Metro Park, Scioto Mile, and the recently opened Scioto-Olentangy Greenways. rick_espe Rick brings a career-long commitment to improving the quality of the built environment while minimizing the impact on the natural environment. Through each project he strives to find the appropriate balance within the interconnectedness of environmental, economic, and social sustainability and implementing sustainable design practices as a value-added proposition. His expertise in the management and design of complex national and international projects and design abilities demonstrate his experience in developing the built environment. Several of his projects have been recognized by the American Society of Landscape Architects awards programs from campus master plans to healthcare facilities to award-winning urban parks. View the full list of speakers here. The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.

    01-03-16

    Sergio Lopez-Pineiro Lecture | Feb 20

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    Please join us at the Brite Winter Fest for an engaging talk from Harvard’s Sergio Lopez-Pineiro entitled, “Three Models of Public Space: Adventure Playgrounds, Whiteswards, and Speakers’ Corners.” Lopez-Pineiro’s lecture will be followed by an announcement of the winners of this year’s COLDSCAPES Design Competition.

    Saturday, February 20th
    3 – 4:30pm
    Brite Winter Festival
    Music Box Supper Club | Lower Level
    1148 Main Avenue
    Flats West Bank, Cleveland, OH


    Click here to RSVP


    Architect Sergio Lopez-Pineiro’s presentation will focus on the imagination and protection of truly open (indeterminate) public space. His research offers insights on how cities can embrace uncertainty, with particular applications for variable winter weather conditions. According to Lopez-Pineiro, cities do not require more specifically defined and controlled public space—despite current political discourses ignited by fear. Rather, we need to think of public space as a source of diversity and relatedness. In order to do this, future cities need to go beyond traditional models of public space. Voids are an opportunity for this alternative type of public space. Programmatic and seasonal temporality is an essential factor in the creation and protection of this openness and indeterminacy.

    Lopez-PineiroSnowscape1Image: Sergio Lopez-Pineiro’s project, Olmsted’s Blank Snow, received an Honorable Mention in the 2013 Coldscapes Design Competition

    As part of the CUDC’s Future City Sessions, the talk will explore an emerging idea in citymaking and is intended to provoke discussion about applications for Northeast Ohio. Lopez-Pineiro’s talk will lay out specific spatial qualities and how these can ignite an alternative type of public space. The value of indeterminacy will be illustrated by a range of projects, including his whitesward landscape project Olmsted’s Blank Snow.

    Sergio Lopez-Pineiro designs and writes about gaps found in everyday spaces, appearing due to mismatched relationships between social structures and spatial organizations. He is the founder of design practice Holes of Matter and 2014-15 Daniel Urban Kiley Fellow in Landscape Architecture at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. He has taught widely, primarily at the University at Buffalo, where he was the 2006-07 Reyner Banham Fellow. His work has been supported by several institutions such as the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA) and The MacDowell Colony, and has been published and featured in MAS Context, Bracket, arq: Architecture Research Quarterly, Places, 2G, and the Boston Globe, amongst others.

    fieldsImage: Studies of continuous, homogeneous, and non-hierarchical Spatial Fields by Holes of Matter

    Lopez-Pineiro graduated from ETSAM (Escuela Técnica Superior de Arquitectura de Madrid) in 1998 and received his M.Arch. degree from Princeton University in 2004, where he was awarded the Suzanne Kolarik Underwood Prize. A registered architect in Spain, Lopez-Pineiro has worked at No.mad (Madrid, 1998-2000) and at Foreign Office Architects (London, 2000-2002).

    This Future City Session is made possible by the generous support of the George Gund Foundation. The lecture is also part of this year’s Center for Outdoor Living Design (COLD) program, supported by the Ohio Arts Council and Brite Winter.

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    12-22-15

    The design/REbuild House nears completion at the end of 2015

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    With major support from the George Gund Foundation and numerous other partners, the CUDC at Kent State’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design have nearly completed our first design/REbuild house. The design/REbuild initiative aims to recapture the value of vacant Cleveland houses that would otherwise be demolished.

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    Our first design/REbuild house is at 1045 E. 67 Street in the St. Clair Superior neighborhood. Thanks to the efforts of KSU students and many community volunteers, we’re now completing the final punch list for a Certificate of Occupancy. The St. Clair Superior Development Corporation, which owns the house, is now negotiating with a buyer. The proceeds from the sale of this first house will be used to rehab another house in the neighborhood. We’re house hunting now!

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    In the spring of 2016, the CUDC will release New Life for Old Homes, a guide book that captures rehab lessons from the design/REbuild house and other recent low cost/high impact housing rehab projects in the city. Thanks to the generous support of the Ohio History Fund, the publication will be available free of charge through the CUDC website.

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    12-21-15

    Point of View: Architecture + Migration

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    Associate Professor, Steve Rugare, will be speaking at Museum of Contemporary Art on January 7th, 2015. Departing from the work of Do Ho Suh, Steve’s talk will look at  how immigrant communities have adapted to the built environment in Cleveland and beyond.

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    Steve Rugare has been a full-time Associate Professor at Kent State University’s College of Architecture & Environmental Design (CAED) since 2009. In addition to teaching introductory courses in architectural history, he teaches urban history and theory at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) and the upper division courses in architectural history and theory. He has also coordinated the Master of Urban Design capstone project at the CUDC. Before 2009, Steve was a full-time member of the CUDC professional staff, managing competitions, coordinating events, and doing editing and graphic design. With Terry Schwarz, he edited the first two volumes of the CUDC’s Urban Infill journal. He has advised the Cleveland Design Competition since its inception.

    Steve Rugare’s primary research focus is modernism in the communicative and planning context of world’s expositions. This work–drawing on a wide interdisciplinary background in political theory, philosophy, art history, cultural studies, and intellectual history—has resulted in several articles and conference presentations, and a book is in the works.

    DATE:
    January 7, 2016
    7:00 PM

    LOCATION:
    Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland (MOCA)
    11400 Euclid Avenue
    Cleveland, OH 44106

    TICKETS:
    Free with museum admission

    12-17-15

    Cleveland Climate Resilience and Urban Opportunity Plan

     

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    Over the past year, the CUDC has been working with Cleveland Neighborhood Progress, the University of Buffalo, the Cleveland Office of Sustainability, and a host of local partners on an initiative to improve climate resilience in Cleveland neighborhoods.

    Although climate change is typically considered a problem for coastal cities, the inland cities of the Great Lakes are also at risk of more extreme weather, protracted heat waves, and increased precipitation. The adverse impacts of climate change disproportionately impact lower income residents and the elderly. This planning effort focused most specifically on the needs of these residents through community-driven projects and programs.

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    We had a one year planning grant from the Kresge Foundation that supported the work of a team of Climate Ambassadors in Cleveland’s Glenville, Slavic Village, Central-Kinsman, and Detroit Shoreway neighborhoods. These four neighborhoods were selected because they are representative of conditions found throughout Cleveland and in other Great Lakes cities. Our planning approach integrates local knowledge and community-based ideas with scientific expertise to help determine where programs and interventions will be most effective in combatting the adverse impacts of climate variability and change. The climate ambassadors received training in basic climate science and mitigation/adaptation strategies  They then served as resources throughout the planning process, recruiting participants for community workshops and helping to identify and prioritize ideas for projects, programs, policies, and future research that would help advance climate resiliency at the neighborhood scale.

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    Based on this initial, nine-month planning process the Kresge Foundation has awarded $660,000 in implementation funding to Cleveland over the next three years. The George Gund Foundation has provided $40,000 in matching support. These funds will be used to:

    • Expand and amplify community engagement efforts and develop new and innovative ways to bring more diverse participants into climate planning and adaptation initiatives.
    • Build on recommendations in existing plans, especially the Cleveland Climate Action Plan, the Climate Action Toolkit, the Cleveland Tree Plan, Re-imagining a More Sustainable Cleveland, and the Cleveland Complete & Green Streets Typologies plan.
    • Connect with existing officials at the region-, county-, and city- level to coordinate climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts.
    • Leverage the city’s growing inventory of vacant land, to convert some of these sites into neighborhood assets that enhance property values and buffer residents against the adverse effects of climate change.
    • Connect with ongoing efforts in other Great Lakes Region cities to share lessons learned and promote resilience at the regional level.

    Out of over 250 initial applicants to Kresge’s Climate Resilience and Urban Opportunity initiative, Cleveland is one of only twelve cities to be selected for implementation funding and the only city in the Great Lakes to receive this support. The CUDC is proud to be a partner on this important and exciting project.

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    12-17-15

    Historic Preservation in Legacy Cities

    Brush Park_Emilie_Evans(photo credit: Emilie Evans)

    In 2014, Cleveland State hosted a conference that looked at historic preservation issues for legacy cities. The term “legacy cities” refers to places like Cleveland, which are experiencing a level of population loss and vacancy that puts historic buildings and neighborhoods at risk. The conference laid the groundwork for a growing network of preservation agencies and allied organizations, including the Preservation Rightsizing Network (PRN), the American Assembly at Columbia University, and the Cleveland Restoration Society, and many others.

    The 2014 conference included a day-long work session to discuss some of the unique preservation challenges faced by legacy cities. Preservation leaders from around the country participated in this event. Key ideas and  outcomes of the workshop were captured in an action agenda intended to guide collaborative preservation efforts in Legacy Cities. PRN engaged the CUDC to produce a concise and visually compelling summary of this work. The Action Agenda for Historic Preservation in Legacy Cities was released at a public event, held at Rutgers University in Newark in early December.

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    As part of the release event, CUDC director Terry Schwarz facilitated a workshop to discuss national priorities for historic preservation in legacy cities from the Action Agenda and discuss the goals and framework of a multi-city pilot project for 2016 and beyond. The results of this workshop will support preservation efforts in Cleveland and other cities that represent the range of challenges and opportunities in legacy cities.

    A follow up conference will be held in Detroit in June of 2016. Please contact PRN for additional information.

    Vacant Not Blighted 1 - Credit Emilie Evans_bw(photo credit: Emilie Evans)

    12-08-15

    Nicholas Rajkovich Lecture | December 11

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    For our final speaker in our Fall Lecture Series we welcome Nicholas Rajkovich. His talk, Designing the Resilient City, will discuss the concept of resilience as it relates to cities, the expected impacts of climate change in Cleveland, and how our design processes need to go beyond just an examination of the physical environment to include issues like social cohesion.

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    Nicholas B. Rajkovich, PhD, AIA is an Assistant Professor at the University at Buffalo. His research investigates the intersection of energy efficiency, renewable energy, and adaptation to climate change. Prior to earning a PhD in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Michigan, he was a Senior Program Engineer at the Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) Company Customer Energy Efficiency Department. At PG&E, he was responsible for coordinating a new Zero Net Energy Pilot Program. He was also chair of the San Francisco American Institute of Architects (AIA) Committee on the Environment.

    The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.

    11-30-15

    Jennifer Mapes Lecture | December 4

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    There are only a couple of lectures left in our Fall Series. Join us Friday, December 4th, as Jennifer Mapes will be discussing Lessons for Sustainability from Small Towns.

    Jennifer Mapes, Assistant Professor of Geography, arrived in Kent in Fall 2012, having previously taught at Plattsburgh State in New York State and University of Southern California in Los Angeles.

    Jen’s dissertation examined the effects of global contemporary change in small towns, connecting theoretical understandings of place and space to on-the-ground outcomes. She spent nine months in seven towns in the American West, interviewing local residents and key decision-makers to learn how their towns experience and react to socio-economic and environmental change.

    Her primary research and teaching interest is connecting global and national change to local outcomes, with a focus on urban sustainability in small cities. Living in downtown Kent, Jen continues her work on small towns by studying causes and effects of the city’s recent downtown redevelopment.

    As a community geographer and internship coordinator, Jen works to connect students to local projects and non-profits. Last year, she taught a new course, “Online Mapping for Community Outreach” in which students created interactive maps to serve local groups.

    The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.

    11-23-15

    Alena Miller and James Lennon Receive AIA Student Awards

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    Each year, AIA Cleveland recognizes excellence in design by inviting local firms and students to submit their best work to be reviewed by nationally renowned juries from all over the country. This year we are excited to announce that two CUDC graduate students received awards. Alena Miller received the Merit Award and James Lennon the Honor Award. Both submitted work from their Graduate Design Studio, focused on Cleveland’s Opportunity Corridor.

    The studio explored new urban planning and design approaches for redeveloping the Corridor through adaptive reuse of vacant land. Led by co-instructors David Jurca, Jeff Kruth, and Pravin Bhiwapurkar, students developed alternative visions for the local neighborhood intended to establish connections with emerging economic development in the region. Of particular interest was the potential for physical interventions to build social cohesion, ecological value, and cultural resources through short- and long-term actions.

    We spoke with Alena and James about their studio experience and design process. First, Alena tells us about her experience and her project, Urban Seam.

    “The summer studio was a unique graduate experience, because it required a concise analysis of the current proposal for Opportunity Corridor. My design process began by identifying strengths within the Kinsman neighborhood that may be viewed as constraints and acknowledging that the existing urban fabric was not useless, but compromised. From this point, I developed a “sewing kit” of urban design strategies that identified formal and informal design solutions that were culturally appropriate for the existing population. These “patches and stitches” create multiple scenarios for future development in the neighborhood. Further expansion of the “residential patch and stitch” included a typology study and the design of alternative housing units that better served the existing population’s needs. The housing typologies met the required density for transit-oriented development while offering social and recreational amenities to the residents. Overall, the design of Urban Seam focused on the positive impact of the Opportunity Corridor on an existing population by creating design strategies that were culturally appropriate, transitional, and a catalyst for future development.” – Alena Miller

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    If you would like to see more of Alena’s award winning project, you can view it here.

    James also shared his overall impressions of the studio and the design process for his project, Reintegration.

    “As far as the Studio experience goes, it was a great learning experience. In general, I believe that the project itself was an excellent opportunity to share insights and generate excitement for possible design solutions in a real world scenario. Being from another city, it was great to see how open-minded Clevelanders are to improving the city with new ideas. The support and feedback we received from a number of city officials and project stakeholders allowed us to better understand problems relative to the site. We were offered an inside look at how these projects may develop.

    I also benefited from having three studio co-instructors. They each provided expertise from different perspectives, forcing us to use critical thinking in making our own decisions for the project. All nine students collaborated well together throughout the semester and served as a great support system. The design language and principles learned in this Urban Design Studio reinforced and improved my understanding of Architecture and its related fields.

    Reintegration_Reintegration, James Lennon

    The design process for my work involved identifying key social, economic, and environmental problems that exist within the site. The solution was to leverage existing anchors and amenities in order to provide a cohesive site that encouraged user interaction through transitional “social condenser” spaces. Interaction with diverse community members will serve as a support system for people who have been recently released from incarceration. My project’s ultimate goal is to reduce recidivism. The design itself was a response to current conditions while also acknowledging the history of the site through various urban design interventions. The programming is organized to connect people with landscape, architecture, and each other.” – James Lennon

    Reintegration_13Reintegration, James Lennon

    If you would like to see more of James award winning project, you can view it here.

    Alena and James both set high personal goals that extended beyond the studio requirements. It is evident by their achievements that their hard work and dedication has paid off. We can’t wait to see what they will accomplish in the future!

     

     

    11-17-15

    design/REbuild house nears the final stretch!

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    Things have been moving on our design/REbuild house this extra-warm fall! On October 17th Sherwin-Williams hosted a Painting Day at the house and a small crew of professionals painted the entire first floor & some of the second. They graciously donated not just the paint, but also their time and impressive expertise. Local sponsors like Sherwin-Williams (and Moen, and the Cuyahoga County Land Bank, and many others) really helped us keep close to our budget for the project – we wouldn’t have been able to do it without them. Plus, they helped us pick out some beautiful colors that really complement the exposed brick and original hardwood floors. It’s an amazing transformation from the beginning of the summer.

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    In addition to the paint, the kitchen cabinets & countertops have also been installed. We’re all especially excited about the red maple island made of rough-sawn slabs from Metro Hardwoods, which salvages trees from the City of Cleveland. Tim Roos of Rooswork worked with us to join and finish the countertop, leaving the tree’s live edge exposed. The house is full of these special details, many creatively reinventing salvaged materials to breathe new life into them – echoing the whole mission of the house itself.

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    We’ve also held two open houses for the local neighborhood & the development community, and it’s been fantastic to finally let people see what we’ve been working on. We opened the house up on Halloween for trick-or-treaters and campfire enthusiasts, and the following week held a happy hour for interested professionals and neighborhood residents. Lots of people have been curious about the project, and now that we’re close to completion it felt like a great time to show everyone around.

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    The great news is that the house is for sale! The price is being finalized right now, but if you’re interested in learning more about the home please contact Andrea Bruno at St. Clair-Superior Development Corporation: ABruno[at]StClairSuperior.org and check out the comp sheet for more details. Thanks to everyone who’s helped us out on the house so far! We’re excited to be on the final stretch.