01-26-17

Macy Nordhaus Banghart | Feb 03

We’re very excited about our Spring 2017 Lecture Series. We start off with Macy Nordhaus Banghart from Aerotek. Marcy is a recruiter for Aerotek Architecture & Engineering.  She specializes in full-time permanent placements in the field of Architecture.  She works with firms all over Ohio to fill their open positions. She has been recruiting for just over 3 years and graduated from Kent State University with a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies.

Macy will be speaking about hiring trends in the field of architecture, what firms are looking for in a candidate, and helpful interview tips that aren’t so obvious. If you are a recent graduate, graduating this spring, or just looking for tips from a professional recruiter this is a lecture you will not want to miss.

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“Over the past three decades we’ve built an unrivaled culture and our unique, people-focused approach yields competitive advantage for our clients and rewarding careers for our contractors. Today we serve virtually every major industry, and we’ve placed exceptional people in hundreds of thousands of roles and positions. Everything we do is grounded in our guiding principles to build and nurture quality relationships that allow us to place quality people in quality jobs.” -Aerotek

Join us, Friday, February 3rd, from 12 -1 PM. As always, this lecture is free and open to the public.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

 

01-05-17

We’re Hiring a Part-Time Office Manager

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The College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) at Kent State University is seeking applicants for a part-time Administrative Clerk/Office Manager at our downtown Cleveland facility.  This position will provide part-time administrative, budget, and clerical support to the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, located in downtown Cleveland. The office manager will maintain all budget documents for projects and the facility; schedule meetings; make sure CUDC is open for business; greet visitors; grant front door entries; assist with student concerns.

Bookkeeping knowledge is required.

Position is Part-Time, 20 hours per week.

Monday through Friday, 8:30 am – 12:30 pm preferred.

Submit all required materials as an on-line application to KSU Human Resources.

To complete the process, go to: https://jobs.kent.edu/ (Position#998181)

Kent State University is an Equal Opportunity Employer

12-08-16

Advocating for Diversity: A Conversation with Michelle Barrett of NOMAS

michele crawford cropMichele Crawford presents her architectural research at the 2014 Design Diversity Powered by PechaKucha event in Cleveland, Ohio

Michele Crawford from Architecture firm Robert P. Madison International speaks with Michelle Barrett, the new president of the National Organization of Minority Architects Student Chapter (NOMAS) at Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design

by Michele Crawford

My inspiration to become an architect emerged from my educational journey. I did not have many architectural influences prior to my start on the path to architecture. My career goal was to become a car designer. I translated this ambition to the creation of interior environments and ultimately completed both a Bachelor of Science degree in Interior Architecture and Master of Architecture from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. The study of architecture in Chicago proved to be an amazing experience. My studio space was on the top floor of The Sullivan Center, formerly the Carson Pirie Scott Building, and I could easily visit historical examples of designs from Frank Lloyd Wright, Renzo Piano, Mies Van Der Rohe, Stanley Tigerman, and others. Using the city as my classroom provided enduring inspiration.

I noticed, however, the lack of admiration of both women and architects of color in the Chicago scene and worldwide. When my professors suggested architects to use as inspiration, they were rarely African American, and never African American women. It was through my own investigations that I found images of architects similar to myself and my culture. Gradually, Paul Revere Williams became my Mies. Norma Merrick Sklarek became my F.L. Wright. Dina Griffith became my Renzo. Sharon Sutton could eloquently express my angst—preparing me for the suppression of the African American voice and visibility in the profession.

In my current position as Project Designer at Robert P. Madison International, I am surrounded by a rich history of architectural contributions from an African American owned firm, currently led by Sandra Madison. I make special attempts to show my face to those who are considering pursuing a design career, and try to persuade those with interest.

Currently, the United States has under 400 licensed African American women architects, making up just under .4% of the greater architect population. We have a desperate need for more representation. The diversity rates nationally in architecture are not keeping up with the changing communities that the profession is called upon to serve. African Americans comprise 13.9% of Ohio’s population. Strikingly, Ohio has 2,650 licensed architects, but only 63 are African American—that’s only 2% of the profession. This disparity has been evident since the inception of the profession. In 2015, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) initiated a deeper conversation about this matter. The AIA surveyed its members and supporters about the perception of diversity and also examined the relationship of diversity to success in the field. Its closing analysis suggested changes in hopes of creating greater equality and more balanced numbers. Communities and demographics are steadily changing, yet, the demographics of the designers of these same spaces are not keeping pace.

As the new president of the National Organization of Minority Architects Student Chapter (NOMAS) at Kent State University, Michelle Barrett is working towards creating and sustaining a space of support for students of color in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED). We recently discussed her ambitions to move past potential and into action in the architecture world’s quickly approaching future. Though the Kent State diversity numbers in the architecture and design programs seem to align with the national averages, the opportunity for a NOMAS chapter to spark a change is hopeful. The current minority students, and specifically Michelle, seem to recognize the importance of support for students of color at Kent State and are working towards change.

Michelle and I had the following conversation about her experience leading the NOMAS Chapter and her plans for the future.

Design Awards Michele and MichelleLeft to Right: Terrance Pitts (Turner Construction), Michelle Barrett, Michele Crawford, Teresa Giralt (Turner Construction), Amir Allenbey at the AIA Cleveland Design Awards

 

Michelle Barrett
Hometown: Gaithersburg, MD
Class / Year: Class of 2017, 4th year
Major: Architecture

 

MC: How did you hear about Kent State?

MB: As many black youth, I thought my future was in sports. I played soccer all of my life up until I tore my ACL during my senior year. Kent State was on my list of schools (for soccer) because my coach had past connections. After it was clear that I wouldn’t be playing sports in college, I had to approach that list of schools differently. Which one would provide the best academic value? Kent State was the answer.

 

MC: What inspired you to pursue the architecture path?

MB: I have always been drawn to art and design. Probably because of my mother; she is a graphic designer. But I never really wanted to be an artist. I wanted to have an impact on people’s everyday lives, to help people. I didn’t know how or what career would allow me to do that. At an away soccer tournament in Miami, a player’s mother took us on a tour of Downtown Miami. She gave us a history lesson on all the Art Deco inspired architecture and the type of events that happened there. I fell in love. At that point I realized how I could be creative, yet impactful, in society.

 

MC: Why NOMAS? Why now? 

MB: I did not previously know about NOMA/NOMAS until CAED Associate Dean Bill Willoughby initiated discussions on the topic. He was and continues to be an integral part of NOMAS here at Kent. After the initial informational presentations he gave students, a group of us students took the lead in formalizing the organization. The other students involved included: Torri Appling, Shelton Finch, and Zai Abdi. I personally took ownership of the process because I thought it was important to have an organization devoted to minority issues (diversity, inclusion, fellowship, etc) in relation to architecture. It’s a unique niche that cannot be fully realized in groups such as Black United Students (BUS).

 

MC: Have you ever felt as if you were treated unfairly because of your gender or race?

MB: On many occasions, people are surprised to hear about my academic achievements—be it my choice of major or my honors standing. After many years, their surprise no longer catches me off guard. However, I still feel an injustice when said individuals expect you to be 10x better than your peers. They hold you to different standards and it is unfair.

 

MC: What has been you favorite studio project?

MB: My favorite studio project was in Third Year Studio—The Media Center Library—a part of the Cleveland International School masterplan. It was the first time we interacted with real clients—the community, the students.

 

MC: As president what are the main goals that you have for the organization?

MB: My main goals for the organization include career development (educational and professional), community engagement in the Greater Cleveland area, and to ensure that the NOMAS voice continues to be heard as a legacy organization in the future CAED community.

 

***

Historically, the voice of the African American architect has been suppressed. However, as our world continues to change, the profession seems to be committed to making the field a more inclusive and welcoming place for all. Organizations like Design Diversity are working to push accountability in this matter. Design Diversity, an advisory committee which grew out of Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC), is committed to educating, connecting, and celebrating diversity in the design professions. Specifically focusing on African American and Latino communities, this group has specific goals of awareness to the larger design community with hopes of encouraging authentic, diverse views and considerations within and throughout the design process. Ultimately, Design Diversity and NOMA/NOMAS are promoting the importance of varied voices in educational and professional design communities.

 

Michele Crawford, Assoc. AIA, is a Project Designer at Robert P. Madison International, based in Cleveland, Ohio. Michele serves on a number of service organizations, including the Design Diversity Advisory Committee. In 2016, Michele was recognized with the Activism Award by AIA Cleveland. Follow Michele on Twitter @initiat_ed.

 

 

References:

NCARB By the Numbers 2015
http://www.ncarb.org/About-NCARB/NCARB-by-the-Numbers/~/media/Files/PDF/Special-Paper/2015NCARBbytheNumbers.ashx

African American Architects Directory
http://blackarch.uc.edu/

Diversity in the Profession of Architecture
http://www.aia.org/aiaucmp/groups/aia/documents/pdf/aiab108092.pdf

African Americans in Ohio
https://development.ohio.gov/files/research/P7003.pdf

 

12-08-16

Helen Liggett’s MOOS photographs on display now through Jan 2 at The Dealership

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Helen Liggett’s documentation of the Summer 2016 activities of students and planners participating in Making Our Own Space at Britt Oval in the Buckeye neighborhood and in the Moreland neighborhood in Shaker will be on display at The Dealership, 3558 Lee Road in Shaker Heights, Monday-Friday, 9AM-5PM, until January 2nd.

The exhibit follows middle school and high school students as they transform ideas about improving their neighborhoods into physical structures.

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The images are arranged in sequences that “tell a story” about particular activities or projects. The Buckeye sequences tend to be about MOOS skills in general. The Moreland sequences tend to be about designing and executing special projects, reflecting the greater maturity of this group. Viewers are encouraged to see the spatial or ordination and communication that building requires. In the end, the art of building play structures is remarkably like the art of building community.

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Helen Liggett’s interests are in the related fields of urban theory, visual culture, and photography. She teaches at the Urban College at Cleveland State University and at the ARCH Studies program at Kent State University.

The Dealership
3558 Lee Road
Shaker Heights, OH
44120

Exhibit Times
Monday – Friday
9AM – 5PM
through January 2, 2017

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11-29-16

Halina Steiner & Forbes Lipschitz | Dec 02

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This Friday, December 2, 2016, we welcome Halina Steiner & Forbes Lipschitz to the CUDC for our last lunch lecture of our Fall Series. Their talk, “Memorials for the Future Competition: American Wild”, will discuss how The National Parks are a living memorial to a uniquely American idea of wilderness. In celebration of the National Parks Centennial, American Wild brings the National Park experience to the Nation’s capital by projection mapping high-definition video of 59 parks onto the L’Enfant Plaza Station over 59 days.

Forbes Lipschitz is an Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at the Austin E. Knowlton School of Architecture at The Ohio State University. She teaches both studio and seminar courses in landscape planning, geographic information systems, and representation. As a faculty affiliate with the Initiative for Food and Agricultural Transformation, her current research explores the role of geospatial analysis and representation in rethinking North American agricultural territories. She has been awarded teaching and research grants from the LSU Office of Research and Development, the Coastal Sustainability Studio, and the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in Fine Arts. Her professional experience in landscape architecture has spanned a range of public, private, and infrastructural work, including a multi-year installation at Les Jardins de Metis. She received her Master in Landscape Architecture from the Harvard Graduate School of Design and a BA in environmental aesthetics from Pomona College in Claremont, California.

Halina Steiner is an Assistant Professor of Landscape Architecture at the Austin E. Knowlton School of Architecture at The Ohio State University. Her current research focuses on the visualization of transboundary hydrologic and infrastructure systems. Prior to her appointment at OSU, Steiner served as the Design Director for DLANDstudio Architecture + Landscape Architecture where she was the project manager for master planning, green infrastructure, temporary installations, and public design projects. This work included Paths to Pier 42, a three-year pop-up park to activate underused waterfront space impacted by Superstorm Sandy, Public Media Commons, The QueensWay Plan, and HOLD System. She received a Master in Landscape Architecture from the City College of New York and a Bachelor of Science in Design in Visual Communication Design from Arizona State University.

Join us, Friday, December 2nd, from 12 -1 PM. As always, this lecture is free and open to the public.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

 



11-22-16

CUDC students win AIA Design Awards!

AIA awards

This past Friday, the Cleveland chapters of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and International Interior Design Association (IIDA) hosted the 2016 Design Awards. The annual event honors work by local professionals as well as students. This year, CUDC students Caitlyn Scoville and Ziyan Ye received awards for their work in the 2016 summer studio; Home Economics: A State of Housing in Cleveland. Scoville was awarded the Honor Award—the highest award possible for her project “Lead Exposed,” while Ye received an Honorable Mention for his project “The Distributed Center.”

Caitlyn Scoville project Lead ExposedClick image to view full project. 

Scoville’s winning project examined housing demolition and redevelopment through a decision-making framework in relation to levels of lead contamination and environmental hazards in Cleveland’s neighborhoods. Her scheme addresses areas of lead concentration within the postindustrial landscape using a series of scales (regional, city, community, and individual) in order to alter the fabric over time. Scoville says of her work in the summer studio, “The studio allowed us to explore different scales of interventions, from the intimate to the city at large, and I think my passion for designing across these multiple scales was articulated in my final project”.

Ziyan Ye project The Distributed CenterClick image to view full project. 

Ye’s project examined new housing options near the proposed expansion of the Nord Family Greenway near University Circle and the Hough neighborhood to better integrate world class institutions and existing neighborhood needs. A variety of housing types and public spaces meet demands for high quality and affordable housing options across the economic spectrum. The proposed expanded greenway contextually weaves together multiple contexts, allowing for the development of multiple neighborhood anchors that tie in to a larger network.

11-08-16

ULI Team Formation Session & Brunch

2017 poster event 2-13-12

Graduate students at the CUDC, Cleveland State University, and Case Western Reserve University are gearing up for another year of the Urban Land Institute’s Urban Design Competition. Students will compete in January for the chance to win $50,000 in this international design and real estate finance competition. In recent years, collaborations between the Cleveland area schools have resulted in four honorable mentions.

Teams of 5 students gather at the CUDC to put together viable urban schemes for North American cities. Questions of transportation, infrastructure, healthy cities, and connectivity are all designed in the two-week competition. Local advisors and ULI representatives from real estate development, banking, architecture, and landscape architecture support the students as they develop hypothetical solutions for real world cities. Throughout November, students will form teams and will prepare for the competition through the winter break. Sunday, Nov. 13 we will sponsor a recruitment brunch at the CUDC. The deadline for registration is Dec. 5th. More information on the competition can be found here.

Team Formation Session and Brunch
Sunday, November 13, 2016
12 PM
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

RSVP at 216-357-3434 or cudc@kent.edu

11-01-16

ULI Competition Informational Session | Nov 4

2016 ULI Poster_560(click image to view larger)

This Friday, November 4 at 6:00pm the CUDC will host an information session for the 2017 ULI Hines Urban Design Competition. The interdisciplinary competition will take place January 9-23 and welcomes graduate students from architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, real estate, MBA, urban planning and associated disciplines. In recent years, students from Kent State University, Case Western Reserve University, and Cleveland State University have received 4 honorable mentions, in the pursuit of a $50,000 grand prize.

Free food and drinks will be provided. If you are interested in attending the information session please contact Jeff Kruth of the CUDC at: jkruth@kent.edu

11-01-16

MUD Research Symposium | Nov 04

Please consider joining eleven Master of Urban Design students and Associate Dean, Bill Willoughby, this Friday, November 4, 11:00AM-1:00PM at the CUDC for a student-led conference we’re calling, Divergent Humanisms for Urban Space.

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2016 MUD Research Symposium participating students:

Samantha Ayotte, “AGRI-SOURCING: A Menu of Options for Food Production in the City”
Elizabeth Ellis, “The Memory of the City: An Argument for Place in an Impending Placeless World”
Morgan Gundlach, “The Secret Life of Autonomous Vehicles”
Megan Mitchell, “A Concern for Happiness in Urban Design”
Casey Poe, “Wanted: Cities for People”
Alexander Scott, “City: The Urban Canvas”
Caitlyn Scoville, “Toxicity”
Elizabeth Weiss, “The City is a Game”
Spencer White, “Be Ye a Foolish Virgin or a Wild One? Designing the City for a Wild 21st Century”
Connor Wollenzier, “A Retroactive Manifesto for Rem Koolhaas”
Ziyan Ye, “Vertical Urbanism”

Friday, November 4, 2016
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

This event is free and open to the public.

10-24-16

Ryan Dewey | Oct 28

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This week we welcome Ryan Dewey to our Fall Lecture Series. He will be speaking at the CUDC this Friday, October 28th,  at 12 PM. His talk is titled, “Landscaping the Deep Future”, is a land art project that speculates at how we can harness future climate conditions for human-geologic collaborations after human extinction by exploring formal relationships between supply chains and geologic forces. Supply chains already are a kind of geologic force in that they move natural materials faster and farther than nature ever could, this project makes use of that acceleration to prime landscapes for phase changes and activation at the transitions of deep future climactic regimes.

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GROOVESRyan Dewey does post-disciplinary translational research that crosses borders between expanded media, cognitive science, and environmental practice. He is the founder of Geologic Cognition Society, an open platform for collaboration focused on helping people experience nature in new ways. He is the author of the upcoming book Hacking Experience: New Tools for Artists from Cognitive Science (Punctum Books), and has also published in KERB, MONU, and Archinect on topics of urban design, landscape design, and spatial-emotional design. Dewey holds an MA from Case Western Reserve University where he served two appointments as visiting researcher in the Department of Cognitive Science exploring design cognition, ethnography, human attention, visual rhetoric and spatial cognition.

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Join us, Friday, October 28th, from 12 -1 PM. As always, this lecture is free and open to the public.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

 

10-18-16

Akron Innerbelt Charrette | Recap

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On October 14-16, the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative took 18 of our grad students to Akron for an intense three-day design workshop, or “charrette”. The students came from our Masters of Architecture, Masters of Urban Design, and Masters of Landscape Architecture programs, plus Cleveland State University’s Masters of Urban Planning & Development program. We were also joined by six students & faculty from Lawrence Tech University in Detroit, plus CUDC alumni.

The three-day charrette examined Akron’s Innerbelt Removal site, the northern section of Highway 59 directly adjacent to Akron’s Downtown. Students, staff, and faculty formed four interdisciplinary teams to each produce a vision for the redevelopment of the site once it closes to vehicular traffic in the next year. They were charged with examining the current Innerbelt site and its linkages to the Downtown, surrounding neighborhoods, and larger region, in order to determine program, density, infrastructure, and character of new development & green space. How can a piece of highway previously perceived as a barrier be transformed into a meaningful connector, a piece of cohesive urban fabric, and a place in its own right?

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To tackle this complex and rich design problem, students first took tours of the site area with City of Akron Planning Director, Jason Segedy; presented preliminary research to a room of local stakeholders, who gave their own advice and feedback; and then got to work producing site analysis and redevelopment concepts. After 48 hours, they presented four schemes on Sunday, Oct 16th to community stakeholders.

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Final schemes addressed such specific topics as:

  • connectivity between the Downtown and the near-west side neighborhoods;
  • four-season recreation opportunities;
  • linking to the existing network of trails like the Towpath;
  • topographic shifts, grading, and landforming;
  • short-term, flexible programming of the roadway surface;
  • retrofitting adjacent Downtown buildings to face new Innerbelt development; and
  • affordable and diverse housing options for all ages and populations.

PowerPoint Presentation

PowerPoint Presentation

The 2016 CUDC Community Design Charrette was graciously supported by the City of Akron; the Knight Foundation; Summit MetroParks; NAIOP Northern Ohio Chapter; and the Mastriana Endowment/4M Company LCC.

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The charrette was recently featured in the Akron Beacon Journal. Read: “Reimagining Akron: Could 30 acres transform downtown into a place where millennials want to live?”

 

 

10-11-16

Making Our Own Stories Podcast Launched!

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Making Our Own Stories, a youth podcast about placemaking, launched its first four episodes. The podcast will reveal the stories behind the projects built in the Buckeye neighborhood through the Making Our Own Space workshops. The podcast puts the mic in the hands of youth, training them to craft and tell stories they find interesting—in their own voice.

MOOStories is led by a team of partners including Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC), designer Ellen Sullivan, Kent State University Master of Landscape Architecture student Jessie Hawkins, community leader and independent radio broadcaster D’Angelo Knuckles, and Sidewalk founder and urban planner Justin Glanville.

Students learned how to use recording equipment so they could interview people on the street, design professionals, grant funders, police officers, and each other. The podcast gives youth the opportunity to ask adults why the neighborhood looks the way it does. Then take actions to make it better.

You can listen to the first four episodes on the MOOS website or on iTunes. We will be posting another episode each week for the next two months. If you enjoy the stories, please share the podcast link on social media and ask your friends to check it out, too. On iTunes, you can rate the podcast (5 stars please!) and leave a comment. The ratings and comments are really important ways to increase the podcast’s reach. We hope MOOStories will help people in Cleveland and across the country get a better understanding of the Buckeye community and how youth can play a larger role in shaping their own neighborhoods.

Want to listen live? There will be a live stream of the podcast at Sidewalks of Buckeye, Thursday, October 13th, from 6-8 PM. The event is sponsored by the Buckeye Shaker Square Development Corporation in partnership with ioby. It will be a night of readings, musical performances, poetry, meditation and more!  There will be  hot dogs and freshly pressed juice. The event will take place at Art and Soul Park, E 118th and Buckeye Rd. 

Making Our Own Stories is made possible through the generous support of the Cleveland Foundation’s Minority Arts & Education Fund.

10-06-16

CAED Hiring Public Relations & Media Specialist

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The College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) at Kent State University is seeking applicants for a full‐time Public Relations and Media Specialist. Responsible for the creation, publication and dissemination of promotional materials, event planning and implementation, web and new media account curating. The position will oversee media communication efforts related to programming, content dissemination, student recruitment, advancement, and alumni relations.

This is a full-time position, located on the main campus in Kent, Ohio. For more information please view the complete job description here.

Submit all required materials as an on‐line application to KSU Human Resources. To complete the process, go to: https://jobs.kent.edu/postings/10885 (Position #989358)

09-26-16

Norman Krumholz | Sept 30

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This week we welcome Norman Krumholz to our Fall Lecture Series. His talk, “Cleveland Neighborhoods in Black and White” will explore equity planning, a theory of urban planning that Norman and his staff practiced with three Cleveland mayors (Stokes, Perk, and Kucinich) in the 1970s.  He will also talk about how an equity planner thinks about certain issues and the results of their work in Cleveland.

Norman Krumholz is a Professor in the Levin College of Urban Affairs at Cleveland State University who earned his planning degree at Cornell. Prior to this, he served as a planning practitioner in Ithaca, Pittsburgh, and Cleveland. He served as Planning Director for the City of Cleveland from 1969-1979 under Mayors Carl B. Stokes, Ralph J. Perk, and Dennis Kucinich. 

Join us, Friday, September 30th, from 12 -1 PM. As always, this lecture is free and open to the public.

 

09-20-16

CUDC welcomes Post Graduate Fellow | Jonny Hanna

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The CUDC created the Post Graduate fellowship as a one-year position for recent graduates holding a Master’s degree in Architecture, Urban Design, Landscape Architecture, or Planning. This year we welcome Jonny Hanna as our Post Graduate Fellow.

Jonny is a Detroit-based real estate developer, architect, and urban designer. He earned his B.S. Architecture and Master of Urban Design from the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Michigan. He has worked in varies design firm in and around the Detroit area, most recently working for A(n) Office on the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale for the U.S. Pavilion. He has previously worked for Clement Blanchet Architecture in Paris and Etchen Gumma Limited in Detroit. He has lectured and been an invited guest critic at Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning and Columbia Graduate School of Architecture Planning and Preservation. His work has been featured on I Made That, Students of Architecture, Arquisemteta, and Paprika! His research focuses on alternative means of representation for projective urban conditions including, cartography, photography, videography and short story narrative writing.

We’re excited to have Jonny on board!