09-12-19

NEGOTIATING BODIES

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Can urban design help facilitate democratic processes? Political theories around Agonism describe the identification and negotiation of conflicts as a way to move towards a radical and diverse new democratic system. This new system arises from accepting that each individual in the system has multiple subjectivities, thus is able to create multiple political negotiated bodies. In this talk these theories will be used as a frame to look at professional and academic urban design work by Quilian Riano, founder of DSGN AGNC and new Associate Director of the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative.

Wednesday, September 18, 2019 from noon-1pm
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, Kent State University
1309 Euclid Avenue, 2nd Floor | Cleveland

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Please join us in welcoming Quilian to Cleveland and the CUDC!  This event is free and open to the public. You’re welcome to bring your lunch and snacks will be served. For more information: 216.357.3434 or cudc@kent.edu.

 

07-05-19

AIA Speakers on the Square

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AIA Cleveland presents, Speakers on the Square, in partnership with #SustainableCLE and APG Office Furnishings.

July 8 at 5:30 pm
APG Office Furnishings, 2516 Detroit Avenue

Panelists include Patrick Kearns of Ohio City Farm/The Refugee Response; Daniel Brown of Rust Belt Riders, and Jacob VanSickle of Bike Cleveland. The conversation will be moderated by Leah Ratner from the Cleveland Clinic.
Complementary Food and drink.

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07-05-19

Ballpark: Baseball in the American City

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Pulitzer Prize-winning architecture critic Paul Goldberger’s new book, Ballpark, is an exhilarating, splendidly illustrated look at the history of baseball told through the stories of the vibrant and ever-changing ballparks where the game was and is staged.

He will be in Cleveland at the Jukebox Courtyard, 1404 W. 29th Street, for a conversation on Monday, July 8 at 5:30pm. This event is free and open to the public.

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06-28-19

Designing for Dignity

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Is inequity hardwired into the design of our neighborhoods, homes and public buildings? If so, could equity and dignity be woven back in by placing people at the heart of the design process? Enterprise Community Partners is pleased to host John Cary at Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland (11400 Euclid Avenue) for a public keynote and conversation about how design can be used as a force for social change.
An architect by training, John has devoted his career to expanding the practice of design for the public good. His new book is called Design for Good: A New Era of Architecture for Everyone and the subject of his new TED talk, How architecture can create dignity for all.
Cocktail reception begins at 6pm | Keynote begins at 7pm
Free and open to the public.

REGISTER

 

06-11-19

Squidsoup on the Detroit-Superior Bridge

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Join us on the streetcar level of the Detroit Superior Bridge on from 10am-11pm on June 22, 2019!

The CUDC is working with UK-based arts group, Squidsoup on two immersive lighting installations for the bridge. Squidsoup’s work in Cleveland is supported by the Creative Fusion program at the Cleveland Foundation. The project is part of Cuyahoga50, a celebration of 50 years of progress since the last time the Cuyahoga River caught fire in 1969.

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The Squidsoup installations include Ascendance at the center span of the bridge, where visitors will be surrounded by light and directly over the river; and Cuyahoga Flow at the eastern end of the bridge, where waves of light will illuminate the remarkable subterranean architecture of the historic subway tunnels.

This is also an opportunity to learn more about planning efforts for the streetcar level of the bridge and offer your ideas about how the space can be improved for public use. Look for the large displays at both ends of the bridge and share your thoughts.

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The event is free and open to all ages. Visitors must wear flat shoes, bring a photo ID, and sign a waiver to enter the bridge. You can sign the waiver on site, or complete it in advance here: BRIDGE WAIVER. No ID is required for children under 18, though a parent or guardian will need to sign a waiver on their behalf.

As part of Cuyahoga50, the RTA will be free all day, so plan to catch a bus or a train to the bridge. The Settlers Landing Station of the RTA Waterfront Line stops near the eastern entrance to the bridge. Bus lines on Superior Avenue and West 25th Street stop near the western entrance.

For more information: cudc@kent.edu or 216.357.3434

 

06-06-19

Worship of Water Dance Ensemble

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On June 19, 2019 from 8-11pm, the Worship of Water Dance Ensemble will be performing on the streetcar level of the Detroit Superior Bridge. This performance is part of a special preview night for the Cuyahoga50 Celebration and the first opportunity to see an immersive lighting installation by UK-based artists, Squidsoup. The preview event is free and open to the public, but registration is required. REGISTER HERE

The Worship of Water is an exploration of the spiritual rituals in honoring water. The Orisha deity Yemoja or Yemayá, is honored by the Yoruba people of Nigeria and those who practice Yoruba and Santeria across Brazil, the Caribbean and the Americas. Yemoja is the deity of water, femininity, and the protector of women and children. She is honored in celebrations through dance, altars, spoken word, and rituals.

The Worship of Water is an attempt to learn from the practice of honoring water so that we may develop a healthier relationship to our waterways. Yemoja serves as our reminder to re-connect with water and to remember what an important role it plays in our daily life. We dance on the edge of one of the largest bodies of freshwater on our planet. May we embrace the responsibility to care for water so that it can provide us with life for future generations to come. Many hands, minds, and spirits who shaped this work, including Parade the Circle staff at the Cleveland Museum of Art who provided an encouraging presence in guiding this project. Thank you to those among us who honor Yemoja and honor water, so we may approach the next 50 years caring for our lakes and rivers with admiration and respect.

05-24-19

PechaKucha Night: Waterways

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On June 20th, 2019, Cleveland will kick off a weekend of celebration with PechaKucha Night: Waterways, a groundbreaking global event featuring presentations from thought leaders from around the world!

Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative is a community partner and we hope you will join us at the event.

Taking place at Jacobs Pavilion at Nautica on the banks of the Cuyahoga almost 50 years to the day of the Cuyahoga River’s last burning, the free event will highlight clean water issues in an exciting, format appealing to those who love creativity, those who love clean water, and all those who love Cleveland.

Presenters from Ethiopia, Uganda, Lebanon, Vancouver, Minneapolis, Detroit, and Cleveland leverage the rapid-fire PechaKucha format to share diverse perspectives on how communities around the world can re-think their relationship with the world’s more important resource. The beauty of the PechaKucha presentation is its concise format: each speaker presents only 20 images and each image is timed to 20 seconds.

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Taraneh Meshkani, Assistant Professor in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State will be one of the presenters. She will talk about the work of our graduate students in a recent studio which focused on reclaiming urban riverfront sites in Cleveland; Beirut, Lebanon; and Medellin, Colombia.

This event is 100% free and open to the public due through the generous support of the Cleveland Foundation and partnership with LAND Studio. Reserve your ticket today at: https://globalpkn.com/

We hope that you us for this unique evening filled with diverse perspectives. Together, let’s celebrate #Cuyahoga50!

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05-17-19

Community Design Charrette: Call for Proposals

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Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative is looking for a city, suburb, town, or neighborhood that is facing an urban design challenge and needs fresh ideas and perspectives. The CUDC will select one community to be the focus of an intensive community design charrette to be held in October of 2019.

The ideal community partner will be a government agency or other vested stakeholder with the potential ability to realize some of the recommendations that emerge during the charrette process. The partner will also be responsible for basic food and lodging for approximately 30 students and staff over a 3-4 day charrette period. The CUDC will bring drawing supplies and expertise.

The CUDC is accepting proposals from communities within about a three-hour radius of Cleveland, as highlighted on the map below. Any community–large or small–is welcome to submit a proposal for the charrette. Major cities are shown on the map for reference.

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What is a Community Design Charrette?
A charrette is an intensive, multi-day planning session where residents, local stakeholders, elected officials, designers collaborate on a vision for future development and public improvements. Recent charrettes have focused on the revitalization of Toledo’s Junction Neighborhood (executive summary and final slideshow); the removal and redevelopment of a section of the Akron Innerbelt; and public space and transportation improvements in Downtown Youngstown.

The community design charrette is a rewarding experience for students who get an opportunity to tackle real-world design challenges and propose solutions. Our partner communities gain a wide range of design and planning ideas in a short and intense period of time.

About the CUDC
The CUDC is the outreach division for the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State University. Based in downtown Cleveland, the professional staff of the CUDC work with communities throughout Northeast Ohio and beyond on a wide range of urban design and planning projects. The CUDC is co-located with the College’s graduate programs in urban design, landscape architecture, and architecture. The Community Design Charrette teams these graduate students with CUDC staff to to tackle a project proposed by a community partner.

The CUDC partners with other design schools, including Lawrence Technological University’s College of Architecture and Design in Detroit, Ball State University’s Urban Design Center in Indianapolis, and the University at Buffalo to bring their graduate students to the selected community for the charrette.

PROPOSAL
Please send a proposal of no more than two pages, introducing your community its particular design challenges and opportunities, along with any other information to help us understand the needs of your community. Maps and photos are welcome, in addition to your two-page proposal. All proposal materials should be combined into a single PDF and emailed to cudc@kent.edu.

TIMELINE

  • June 17, 2019: Deadline to submit your proposal
  • June 30, 2019: Selection of charrette community
  • Early-mid October, 2019: Community design charrette in selected community

 

 

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DELIVERABLES for the PARTNER COMMUNITY

Students and staff will produce a series of analytical drawings, diagrams, renderings, design guidelines, and other relevant planning & urban design graphics, to be presented to the community partner at the end of the Charrette period. Following the Charrette, CUDC staff will assemble the design proposals into a final report and presentation to be delivered to the community partner by the end of 2019.

QUESTIONS?
Contact the CUDC at cudc@kent.edu or 216.357.3434

05-03-19

Cleveland Climate Action Plan Wins APA Award

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The Cleveland Climate Action Plan: Building Thriving and Resilient Neighborhoods for All, from the City of Cleveland’s Mayor’s Office of Sustainability, has been recognized by the APA Sustainable Communities Division! The 2019 Annual Awards for Excellence in Sustainability have recognized the 2018 CAP Update in the category “Community Sustainability or Resilience Plan.”

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In 2018 the CUDC worked with the Mayor’s Office of Sustainability on the information design & graphic design of the CAP Update & its Appendices. Additionally, the CUDC produced a short fold-out brochure highlighting the main takeaways from the Plan. We’re proud to support our city’s efforts in increasing the sustainability of our region.

Click here to download the full 2018 CAP Update, and here to view the Snapshot. Congratulations, CAP Team!

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05-01-19

Living Architecture Symposium

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Please join us at a day-long seminar championing Ohio activities and linking local resources for the advancement of vegetative roofs, walls, and innovative forms of living architecture. Join this kick-off event of the Greater Ohio Living Architecture Center (GOLA) to learn about Ohio’s university research and education activity; policy and incentive programs; and new projects from industry and design professionals. Tuesday, May 21, 2019 | 8:30 am – 6:30 pm

  • Morning: Local to Global market places and trends
  • Afternoon: Research Innovation emerging from Ohio labs, student and faculty.
  • Evening: Socialize at Masthead brewery

Check out the Agenda. Register Soon. Seats are limited. See you there.  https://www.golacenter.org/

04-04-19

Zero Threshold Design Competition

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ZeroThreshold is an international architectural design competition that elevates ideas of housing accessibility through beautiful design.

Winning entries will receive monetary awards and be featured in an exhibition and publication. The strongest and most innovative awards may be constructed in a future second phase of the competition. The submission deadline in June 28, 2019.

Meet the jurors…

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GYUNGIU CHYON is an assistant professor of Product and Industrial Design at Parsons.

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ANDREW FRONTINI is a Principal at Perkins+Will and the Design Director of the Toronto and Ottawa studios.

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SHEENA MCGEE, Allied ASID, is the principal and owner of Sheena McGee Designs in Cleveland, Ohio.

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JUSTIN GARRETT MOORE is an urban designer and the executive director of the New York City Public Design Commission.

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LIZ OGBU is a designer, urbanist, and spatial justice advocate. She is an expert on social and spatial innovation in challenged urban environments globally.

04-04-19

Dialoguing Toledo

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Please join us at noon on April 12 for a lecture by Elizabeth Ellis entitled Dialoguing Toledo. The lecture will be held at the CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue on the second floor. Elizabeth will discuss the quest to capitalize on grassroots organizational capacity and community engagement within the city of Toledo.

Toledo has a population and infrastructural bandwidth that is not quite large enough to be considered one of Ohio’s big cities. Within the city, there is the feeling that it is left out or somehow cheated by Capitol Hill. But the root of the problem can likely be traced to a lack of transparency and the need to control outputs that stem from local organizations.

While topics such the algal bloom, or most recently the Lake Erie Bill of Rights, make national headlines, there is still no clear line of sight to which organizations manage the underlying environmental issues that Toledo has faced since its birth. Almost equally as important to environmental issues is how the city draws lines in physical plans for expansion and continued stabilization in the near future. The City of Toledo is fighting the clock as the latest city-wide plan, completed in 2011, will be obsolete after 2020. With the City of Toledo Plan Commission staff at a deficit, there is a need for an organization to help take on long range planning and implementation efforts.

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One consistent factor in promoting change within Toledo has been grassroots organizations. It was a local group of concerned community members who took on implementing the Lake Erie Bill of Rights, and it will eventually be a team of multiple local organizations who take on the Toledo “Future City Plan.” So how Toledo better leverages these organizations to get the work done ultimately becomes the quest. Sustainable partnerships of grassroots internal linkages and linkages to major Toledo institutions becomes pivotal in ensuring capacity. There is an immense opportunity for expansion of expertise as the gap that excludes them seems to grow. Toledo has looked outside city limits to capture talent that already exists within its grassroots efforts, so at what point does all of the hard work pay off?

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Elizabeth’s talk is part of our alumni series in which graduates from Kent State’s Cleveland-based design programs talk about their work. This event is free and open to the public. You’re welcome to bring a brown bag lunch and refreshments will be served.

04-01-19

Happy 150th, CPL!

 

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In December of 2018 Cleveland’s South Branch, a historic Carnegie library in the Tremont neighborhood, reopened to the public. The hundreds of community stakeholders who reentered their local library for the first time in years discovered a renovated hybrid space where historic woodwork & Tudor-style windows coexist with recording studios, multimedia meeting spaces, and room for teens. Youth were already experimenting with the interactive VR equipment, while older residents were sitting near the fireplace in comfortable chairs reading the newspaper. The crowd was incredibly diverse, spanning multiple neighborhoods, ages, languages, and organizations.

In the ensuing months, the branch has already become a community hub, demonstrating the ways libraries are changing to meet new social & technological needs. South Branch embodies a new vision for a neighborhood branch library, and is at the forefront of a wave of changes for all our urban branches.

Since 2014, the CUDC has been collaborating with the Cleveland Public Library on a community visioning process for their branch libraries, including South Branch. Through the process, we’ve spoken with hundreds of Clevelanders about how they use and interact with their local neighborhood libraries, and how they’d like their libraries to evolve. Ironically, many voiced their fears that in the 21st century our libraries may become obsolete – even as they themselves continue to revolutionize the way we use our branches.

In reality, in an era of overwhelming access to information, Cleveland’s public libraries are more important than ever. Far from simply being repositories for books, today’s libraries provide technology training, social services, safe space for youth, and community work spaces. They attract hugely diverse user groups, and could be made even more relevant to a wider range of people—truly becoming community hubs for the public.

2019 is CPL’s 150th Anniversary, with a whole host of events & celebrations planned throughout the year. As an anniversary gift to our favorite library system and its incredible staff, here are some findings we’d like to share. Read more…

03-06-19

Making Our Own Space

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Now in its fifth year, Making Our Own Space (MOOS) is a CUDC program in which teenagers design and build public space improvements that make their neighborhoods more comfortable, functional, and appealing. MOOS began in Cleveland’s Buckeye neighborhood with the support of the Saint Luke’s Foundation and has since expanded to other neighborhoods around the city.

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Last fall, the CUDC partnered with the Detroit Shoreway Community Development Organization to bring MOOS to the neighborhood for the first time. For one week, students worked in Dudley Triangle, a pocket park at the intersection of Dudley Avenue and 73rd Street. This location is particularly significant to us, since the conversion of this vacant lot into a public park was a recommendation included in the 2013 neighborhood plan that the CUDC prepared for the south end of Detroit Shoreway. It’s exciting to see our partners implement ideas for public spaces generated during a community planning process, and especially rewarding when we get to contribute to the activation of one of those spaces through MOOS.

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For this workshop, the youth focused their work on improving the pedestrian experience on the nearby Lorain Avenue commercial corridor. Working in groups, they developed two concepts—one for a long bench dubbed the Lorain Lounger and another for a larger sheltered seat with an iconic framework design surrounding it. Despite a week of almost constant rain, the crew rallied to quickly develop their ideas and realize final iterations of their designs. We were excited to incorporate some lighting features into the finished products, and share some of our work with the DSCDO community at their recent annual meeting.

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MOOS students also designed one of the winning entries in the Sit & See CLE competition, sponsored by Destination Cleveland and LAND studio. Sit & See CLE will create a collection of places where Clevelanders and visitors can sit (or stand) and take in views along Cleveland’s trail system and possibly get a new perspective. The MOOS team is building a three-dimensional viewing platforms along the recently opened section of the Cleveland Lakefront Bikeway, between West 28th Street and West Boulevard. The students built a prototype on-site in February and will work with a professional fabricator to build a permanent structure on the site this spring. 

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Visit wearemoos.org or email CUDC urban designer Katie Slusher to learn more about the exciting things going on with MOOS.

03-06-19

Historic American Landscape Survey for Liberty Row

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Please join us for a lecture by Landscape Architect Jeff Knopp on Friday, March 8 at noon at Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, 1309 Euclid Avenue, 2nd Floor.

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Jeff Knopp PLA, ALSA, CID is Principal and President of Behnke Landscape Architecture in Cleveland.

He will  will discuss his experience in participating in the Historic American Landscape Survey (HALS) challenge co-sponsored by the National Park Service and American Society of Landscape Architects. In particular, he will discuss his 2018 submission documenting the history of Liberty Row.

This event is free and open to the public. You are welcome to bring your lunch. Light refreshments will also be served.