10-17-17

Cleveland Public Library: Community Vision Plan Wrap-Up!

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We’re happy to announce the final publication of our CPL150 Community Vision Plan!

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For the past three years, CUDC staff have been working with the Cleveland Public Library (CPL) on their Community Vision Plan. One of CPL’s strategic priorities is to prepare the library system for its 150th anniversary, in 2019. CPL150, the name of the engagement process, involved 13 of the system’s 27 branch communities to ask what they need from their local library branch.

CPL faces a challenge familiar to many institutions serving communities in Cleveland: How can we best meet the needs of our patrons in a changing context of new technologies, aging facilities, and declining population? How can each branch custom-tailor its library experience to meet the specific needs of its community?

For each group of branches, the team engaged community members in a series of public meetings, surveys, open houses, advisory committee meetings, and targeted focus groups, for a three-year total of over 1,500 points of engagement. The team then produced a report for each group, summarizing the engagement feedback and the final recommendations. These recommendations included physical improvements, like interior reconfiguring or exterior seating areas, but also ideas for improving services, as well as larger neighborhood connections which can better integrate each branch into its surroundings. We summarized this overall branch experience into four distinct, nested levels: library building; library grounds; neighborhood; and library services.

Experience-Diagram

The final reports, from all three years, are on our CPL150.org site, available for perusal or download:

Group 1 (2015): Fleet, South, Sterling, and Woodland branches (Purchase report on Amazon)

Group 2 (2016): Brooklyn, Mt Pleasant, and South Brooklyn branches (Purchase report on Amazon)

Group 3 (2017): Eastman, Hough, Union, Walz, and West Park branches (Purchase report on Amazon)

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In addition, we’ve assembled a Summary Report which outlines some of the major themes we heard across most or all branches studied (Purchase Summary Report on Amazon). The design team found that far from becoming obsolete, our neighborhood libraries are more important than ever for the many ways they continue to serve their local population. Our library branches are information centers, community work spaces, workforce assistance centers, after-school gathering spots, and more.

Please visit cpl150.org for more information on our three-year collaboration with the Cleveland Public Library!

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05-02-16

AIA Goodtime for Design Boat Cruise | June 3

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Join members in the design, planning, construction and building management professions on board the GOODTIME III cruise ship for an evening of informal networking, collegiality and fun! Over 500+ attendees regularly attend and enjoy themselves on the cruise! Passengers enjoy food and drink while the Goodtime III cruise ship navigates down the Cuyahoga River and out onto Lake Erie. This event proves to be a terrific opportunity to network between members from multiple design organizations. Family, friends and guests are welcome and encouraged to attend.

After the cruise the fun continues at the After-Party which will be held on the private upper deck of Shooters in the Flats! A limited number of tickets are available for the After-Party so make sure to purchase yours before they are sold out.

Ticket Prices
$25 for boat cruise ONLY ticket
$30 for boat cruise and after-party combined ticket

For more information on the event including times, locations, parking and to purchase your tickets, please visit www.aiacleveland.com/boatcruise. This year’s theme is a “Black | White Party” so come dressed in all black, all white, or a little of both!

11-23-15

Alena Miller and James Lennon Receive AIA Student Awards

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Each year, AIA Cleveland recognizes excellence in design by inviting local firms and students to submit their best work to be reviewed by nationally renowned juries from all over the country. This year we are excited to announce that two CUDC graduate students received awards. Alena Miller received the Merit Award and James Lennon the Honor Award. Both submitted work from their Graduate Design Studio, focused on Cleveland’s Opportunity Corridor.

The studio explored new urban planning and design approaches for redeveloping the Corridor through adaptive reuse of vacant land. Led by co-instructors David Jurca, Jeff Kruth, and Pravin Bhiwapurkar, students developed alternative visions for the local neighborhood intended to establish connections with emerging economic development in the region. Of particular interest was the potential for physical interventions to build social cohesion, ecological value, and cultural resources through short- and long-term actions.

We spoke with Alena and James about their studio experience and design process. First, Alena tells us about her experience and her project, Urban Seam.

“The summer studio was a unique graduate experience, because it required a concise analysis of the current proposal for Opportunity Corridor. My design process began by identifying strengths within the Kinsman neighborhood that may be viewed as constraints and acknowledging that the existing urban fabric was not useless, but compromised. From this point, I developed a “sewing kit” of urban design strategies that identified formal and informal design solutions that were culturally appropriate for the existing population. These “patches and stitches” create multiple scenarios for future development in the neighborhood. Further expansion of the “residential patch and stitch” included a typology study and the design of alternative housing units that better served the existing population’s needs. The housing typologies met the required density for transit-oriented development while offering social and recreational amenities to the residents. Overall, the design of Urban Seam focused on the positive impact of the Opportunity Corridor on an existing population by creating design strategies that were culturally appropriate, transitional, and a catalyst for future development.” – Alena Miller

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If you would like to see more of Alena’s award winning project, you can view it here.

James also shared his overall impressions of the studio and the design process for his project, Reintegration.

“As far as the Studio experience goes, it was a great learning experience. In general, I believe that the project itself was an excellent opportunity to share insights and generate excitement for possible design solutions in a real world scenario. Being from another city, it was great to see how open-minded Clevelanders are to improving the city with new ideas. The support and feedback we received from a number of city officials and project stakeholders allowed us to better understand problems relative to the site. We were offered an inside look at how these projects may develop.

I also benefited from having three studio co-instructors. They each provided expertise from different perspectives, forcing us to use critical thinking in making our own decisions for the project. All nine students collaborated well together throughout the semester and served as a great support system. The design language and principles learned in this Urban Design Studio reinforced and improved my understanding of Architecture and its related fields.

Reintegration_Reintegration, James Lennon

The design process for my work involved identifying key social, economic, and environmental problems that exist within the site. The solution was to leverage existing anchors and amenities in order to provide a cohesive site that encouraged user interaction through transitional “social condenser” spaces. Interaction with diverse community members will serve as a support system for people who have been recently released from incarceration. My project’s ultimate goal is to reduce recidivism. The design itself was a response to current conditions while also acknowledging the history of the site through various urban design interventions. The programming is organized to connect people with landscape, architecture, and each other.” – James Lennon

Reintegration_13Reintegration, James Lennon

If you would like to see more of James award winning project, you can view it here.

Alena and James both set high personal goals that extended beyond the studio requirements. It is evident by their achievements that their hard work and dedication has paid off. We can’t wait to see what they will accomplish in the future!

 

 

04-21-15

Keith Hayes + Nikole Bouchard | In Version: The Mistaking of Placemaking

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Join AIA Cleveland and the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative for the next lecture in the Emerging Practitioners Series as we welcome visiting designers Keith Hayes and Nikole Bouchard. Based in Milwaukee, Keith and Nikole are currently working in Cleveland’s St. Clair Superior neighborhood on the matireal landshape project. Focused on creating an up-cycled public plaza, the project will reuse discarded tires to construct topography and engage residents to build community.

In Version: The Mistaking of Placemaking
A first hand perspective on the amalgam of forces at work (Keith) and the role of architecture in the field of public interest design (Nikole).

Friday, April 24, 2015
5:30pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115
Lecture is free and open to the public.
Visit the Facebook event page here.

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As a designer and social entrepreneur, Keith Hayes is informed by interfacing with resources, landscape, and language.

ln 2010, he launched beintween, a social and spatial organization improv(is)ing leftover spaces, based in Milwaukee, WI. Noteworthy accomplishments include a successfully funded Kickstarter for matireal, an 8 acre linear corridor known as the artery, a guerilla installation known as the swing park, and the organization of a design/build coopetition. He is now actively pursuing partnerships to develop a takerspace, the reclamation of a double lot + vacant home in Milwaukee, in addition to a plaza proposal in Cleveland. Hayes informs his practice through the application of relationships, resources, and research through a process he refers to as sp/acement, whereby arts and cultural development become a retainer of community rather than a token to displace it.

Education:
University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, MArch
University of Miami, BArch

Nikole Bouchard’s research focuses on how the intersection between architecture, landscape, and infrastructure can stimulate ecologically sensitive and culturally relevant design interventions.

Nikole has previously taught at Syracuse University, Cornell University, The University of Waterloo and The University of Toronto. While teaching in Canada, Nikole collaborated with Toronto-based InfraNet Lab/Lateral Office on various design competitions and exhibitions. During this time, a number of award-winning projects were produced, including the 2011 Holcim Gold project Regional Food-Gathering Nodes and Logistics Network in Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada. Prior to joining InfraNet Lab/Lateral Office, Nikole worked at the offices of Steven Holl Architects and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP in New York City.

Education:
Princeton University, MArch
Cornell University, BArch

For more information, contact the CUDC at cudc(at)kent.edu or call (216) 357-3438.

04-14-15

Spring Lecture Series | MAKER

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CUDC LUNCH TALK

M A K E R // Westleigh Harper and Michael Horton
Friday, April 17th
12-1pm
CUDC Conference Room, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Event is free and all are welcome!
Click here to RSVP.

Elastic Limits

MAKER is a Cleveland-based design studio established in 2011 by Westleigh Harper and Michael Horton. The firm was founded on the principle of responsibly contributing to the development of the City’s urban fabric. Through design, construction and planning exercises, they seek to uncover the inherent potentials specific to each site while progressing the design culture of the region forward. In addition, factors such as project timeline, budget, site constraints and zoning restrictions are viewed as generative attributes. This method has instigated new opportunities within each project, allowing their studio to produce thought-provoking work and contribute to the success of our Cleveland neighborhoods.

Their lecture, titled “Elastic Limits”, will follow the trajectory of their growing practice from its inception in 2011 to the present. Maximizing density, material exploration, and responding to client and zoning challenges are common themes throughout their body of work and have served as the guiding ethos behind their design process.

To RSVP, please click here. (RSVPs encouraged, but not required.)

For more information, please contact us at cudc@kent.edu or (216) 357-3434.

 

03-02-15

Women in Architecture & Design: Lecture, Panel & Exhibit | March 11, 2015

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To celebrate Women’s History Month in March, AIA Cleveland presents an evening with 5 prominent female architects and designers that will broaden the discussion of gender roles within the architecture profession.

The program will begin with a lecture by Elizabeth Corbin Murphy, FAIA on important female designers in history and her own experience in elevating as an Ohio AIA Gold Medalist, the highest honor the institute bestows on an individual. Following Elizabeth’s talk, she will moderate a panel discussion with 4 other influential female practitioners to engender a discussion about the opportunities and challenges for women in the contemporary design and construction workplace.

An exhibition will be mounted as part of the program to be exhibited at the CUDC and subsequently in the gallery of the AIA Cleveland office through the month of April.

To learn more or to register please visit here

When:
Wednesday, March, 11, 2015
5:30 – 7:30 PM

Where:
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

Cost:
Free for AIA Members and students
$10 for Non- Members
(light refreshments provided)

10-07-14

Alumni Lecture Series | Theodore Ferringer

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Designer Theodore Ferringer, Assoc. AIA, LEED Assoc., joins us this Friday for another installment of our Alumni Lecture Series.

Theordore works, resides and advocates in Cleveland, OH. A graduate of the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (MArch ’08, MUD ’08), his enthusiastic activism, creativity, and community involvement has led to roles on Cleveland’s East Side Design Review Committee, and the Bike Cleveland Advocacy Committee. Theodore is the American Institute of Architects (AIA) Ohio Valley Region Associate Director as a member of the National Associates Committee and is a Designer and the Business Development Director at Bialosky + Partners Architects.

Theodore’s talk, Designing in Public: Agency, Empowerment, & Sensibility or Towards A 21st Century Gesamtkunstwerk Via a Few Buildings, a Couple Panning Projects, Some Projects That Are Not Buildings, An Advocacy Issue, and a Couple Other Things focuses on these issues through lessons learned in his own career.

As always our Alumni Lecture Series is free and open to the public. Join us from 12-1 PM on October 10th, 1309 Euclid Ave, Suite 200.

 

05-13-13

LECTURE: Marika Shioiri-Clark on Dignifying Design

Marika Shioiri-Clark, principal of SOSHL Studio, will speak at the CUDC on “Dignifying Design” as part of AIA Cleveland‘s 2013 Emerging Practitioner Lecture Series. Based in Cleveland, SOSHL Studio is dedicated to creating social impact through architecture and design. In response to Denise Scott Brown’s comments on her exclusion from the Pritzker Prize, Marika recently co-authored a CNN.com article on the continuing discrimination of women in architecture.

Marika Shioiri-Clark | Dignifying Design
Friday, May 31, 2013
5:30pm
Kent State CUDC
1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
RSVP on the Facebook event page here

From 2007 to 2010, Marika was Co-Founder and Managing Director of MASS Design Group, an architectural nonprofit designing well-built environments that aid in the reduction of global poverty. Marika was a lead designer on the Butaro Hospital project in northern Rwanda in collaboration with Partners in Health, the Clinton HIV/AIDS Initiative, and the Rwandan Ministry of Health, and lived on-site in 2008 developing the designs and overseeing construction.


Marika has received several awards for her work in reframing architects as global change agents. She was an invited Ideas Scholar at the Aspen Institute in 2009, and received a US National Commission for UNESCO Traveling Fellowship in 2008. Marika received her BA in Urban Studies from Brown University, and her Masters of Architecture from the Harvard Graduate School of Design, where her graduate thesis under advisors Jacques Herzog and Pierre DeMeuron focused on gendered public spaces in Cairo, Egypt. In 2011 she served in the first class of global residents at IDEO.org.

Watch Marika’s TEDxStellenbosch talk on Empathic Architecture:

The Emerging Practitioner Lecture Series is organized by AIA Cleveland‘s Associates Committee in partnership with Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative. Events are free and open to the public.

Questions can be directed to: angela.jayjack@gmail.com