04-20-17

Hingetown Tour | April 28 | 12-1 PM

HT_1

For our last “lecture” of the Spring Series, we will be going on a tour of Hingetown to view and discuss the community projects happening in this neighborhood in Ohio City. Join us April 28, 2017, at 12 PM. The tour will begin at the corner of 29th & Detroit Ave. and will last about an hour. Our tour guides will be Marika Shioiri-Clark & Graham Veysey both residents and developers of this neighborhood. Stops on the tour will include the Striebinger block, the Print Shop buildings, few of the Creative Fusion murals, as well as, the new Spaces Gallery and the Transformer Station.

HT_2

CHURCH AND STATE 1

Marika Shioiri-Clark and Graham Veysey spend their days in a 140-year-old firehouse in Hingetown – part of the Ohio City neighborhood. As neighborhood developers and designers, Marika and Graham converted the vacant Ohio City Firehouse into a vibrant mixed-used building with a coffee shop, florist, and collection of offices. Graham and Marika developed the block kitty-corner from the Firehouse into a vibrant retail and residential building just completed a third project called the Print Shop, and have been involved in planning numerous public events in the area. Called Hingetown, their work often focuses on connections and collaborations through the arts to promote public space and walkability across the near west side of Cleveland.

t-private-lives-hingetown-peter-lawson-graham-veysey-marika-shiori-clark-vf

Photo credit: Peter Larson

Hingtown Tour
April 28, 2017
12-1 PM
29th & Detroit Ave.
Cleveland, OH 44113

HT_3

03-23-17

Mapping the Design Journey

by Jacinda Walker
Founder, designExplorr.com 

Design Journeys: Strategies for Increasing Diversity in Design Disciplines from Jacinda Walker on Vimeo.

The journey to a career can be met with great success or great struggle. When a traveler is prepared for the journey, they typically cover more distance and the experiences they encounter become quick stops along the way— moments of pause that, with rest and refueling, allow them to begin again. However, for a traveler who is less prepared to face the bumps, twists, and turns of the road, minor challenges become major roadblocks. Those minor challenges become permanent barricades that ultimately inhibit travel and one’s likelihood to continue on the path of success. Unfortunately, the latter path described here is all too common among young African American and Latino youth who seek a design-related career.

This line of inquiry led me to visualize what the journey to becoming a designer looks like and analyze what tools are needed to obtain a design-related career. My research work entitled, Design Journeys: Strategies for Increasing Diversity in Design Disciplines (2016) explores diversity in design disciplines and presents fifteen strategic ideas to expose African American and Latino youth to design-related careers. This solutions-based thesis introduces a map charting a design career from grade school to a seasoned professional. The “Design Journey Map” contains four color-coded passages: foundations, proficiency, workforce, and influence. The passages overlap with career competency components to cultivate soft skills together with the hard skills youth learn along the journey to a design career.

designJourney-ReDraw4

Figure 1: The Design Journey Map in full

The Design Journey Map is a simple navigational tool that can be used as a framework to better inform students, parents, professionals and organizations which strategic ideas are needed and where to place them along the career path to increase diversity in design disciplines.

This framework is important because it shows the journey to become a designer and provides four principles of a strategic solution for closing the diversity gap in the design industry. The principles address the complex problem of a lack of diversity in design by identifying characteristics of a strategic solution needed for helping to close the diversity gap in design. They are labeled as comprehensive, collaborative, local, and scholastic. These Design Principles help to ensure long-term success for programs and initiatives whose intent is to expose African American and Latino youth to design-related careers.

design Principles characteristics to solution-01

Figure 2: The four Design Principles for a strategic solution

Read more…

03-21-17

Samantha Ayotte | April 07

samantha_ayotte

On April 7, 2017, we welcome Samantha Ayotte to our Spring Lecture Series. Her talk, “My Birthright”, will present findings from her cultural exploration through Israel for her Birthright trip. There will be a discussion about how cultural, political, and religious experiences can differ and how they can provide solutions for contemporary living.

thumb_IMG_9576_1024

Samantha Ayotte is a second-year dual degree (M.Arch, M.UD) candidate from Cleveland, Ohio. She holds an undergraduate degree in Architecture from Kent State University. She enjoys the opportunity to design and understand urban design challenges and solutions for cities like Cleveland through contemporary means of investigation. She believes communities and shared experiences can positively impact urban design, and her work thus far has aimed to implement those elements.

thumb_IMG_0190_1024

Please join us from 12 PM - 1PMFriday, April 7th. This event is free and open to the public.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

02-28-17

Lithuanian Architect Aurimas Širvys presents at Cleveland State University

Aurimas_headshot

Levin College Forum Brown Bag Lunch Program Recovering Lithuania’s Architectural Cultural Heritage

A Presentation from Lithuanian Architect Aurimas Širvys
Monday, March 13, 2017
12:00 – 1:30 p.m.
Bonda Board Room 254
1717 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, Ohio 44115

Jointly Sponsored By the Levin College Forum Program and the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative

ziezmariai-synagogue-aurimas

Wooden synagogue in Ziezmariai, Lithuania under restoration. Photo: Aurimas Širvys

During nearly 50 years of Soviet occupation, buildings that were part of Lithuania’s cultural heritage, such as churches, monasteries, synagogues, and manor homes, were “re-purposed,” destroyed, or neglected.  Furthermore, news and education were highly controlled and politicized so that the public only heard a view of the country’s past that was distorted to serve the Soviet state.  As a result, much of the country’s cultural heritage was not known or well understood, especially by younger Lithuanians.

Since Lithuania regained its independence, architect Aurimas Širvys has advised individuals and organizations who have undertaken projects to restore the condition of existing buildings of cultural heritage.  He has also made studies of images of “lost buildings” and made two- and three-dimensional representations of those buildings so that the memory of such buildings can endure.

Mr. Širvys will discuss how he became interested in helping Lithuania recover its architectural cultural history and some of the restoration projects in which he has participated.

Please RSVP to m.s.schnoke@csuohio.edu

01-30-17

Mabel O. Wilson | Feb 09

Mabel Wilson headshot_560_bw

On Thursday, February 9th, we welcome Mabel O. Wilson to our Spring Lecture Series. Mabel’s talk, “Building Racial States”, will address race and nation-state formation and its implication in current social movements.

Mabel O. Wilson is a Professor of Architecture at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation where she co-directs the Global Africa Lab and appointed as a Research Fellow at the Institute for Research in African-American Studies. She has authored Begin with the Past: Building the National Museum of African American History and Culture (2016) and Negro Building: African Americans in the World of Fairs and Museums (2012). Exhibitions of her work have been featured at the Art Institute of Chicago, Istanbul Design Biennale, Wexner Center for the Arts, and the Smithsonian’s Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum’s Triennial. She is a founding member of Who Builds Your Architecture?—an advocacy project to educate the architectural profession about the problems of globalization and labor.

Mabel will also be speaking at the College of Architecture & Environmental Design at the Cene Lecture Hall at 5:30 PM, in Kent, OH. Her evening lecture is titled, “Notes on the Virginia Statehouse: Slavery, Race, and Jefferson’s America”.

This event is free and open to the public. RSVP isn’t required, but it is requested. Please RSVP HERE.

Thursday, February 9, 2017
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

01-26-17

Macy Nordhaus Banghart | Feb 03

We’re very excited about our Spring 2017 Lecture Series. We start off with Macy Nordhaus Banghart from Aerotek. Marcy is a recruiter for Aerotek Architecture & Engineering.  She specializes in full-time permanent placements in the field of Architecture.  She works with firms all over Ohio to fill their open positions. She has been recruiting for just over 3 years and graduated from Kent State University with a Bachelor of Arts in Communication Studies.

Macy will be speaking about hiring trends in the field of architecture, what firms are looking for in a candidate, and helpful interview tips that aren’t so obvious. If you are a recent graduate, graduating this spring, or just looking for tips from a professional recruiter this is a lecture you will not want to miss.

Mktg_AerotekLogo_Tagline

“Over the past three decades we’ve built an unrivaled culture and our unique, people-focused approach yields competitive advantage for our clients and rewarding careers for our contractors. Today we serve virtually every major industry, and we’ve placed exceptional people in hundreds of thousands of roles and positions. Everything we do is grounded in our guiding principles to build and nurture quality relationships that allow us to place quality people in quality jobs.” -Aerotek

Join us, Friday, February 3rd, from 12 -1 PM. As always, this lecture is free and open to the public.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

 

12-08-16

Advocating for Diversity: A Conversation with Michelle Barrett of NOMAS

michele crawford cropMichele Crawford presents her architectural research at the 2014 Design Diversity Powered by PechaKucha event in Cleveland, Ohio

Michele Crawford from Architecture firm Robert P. Madison International speaks with Michelle Barrett, the new president of the National Organization of Minority Architects Student Chapter (NOMAS) at Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design

by Michele Crawford

My inspiration to become an architect emerged from my educational journey. I did not have many architectural influences prior to my start on the path to architecture. My career goal was to become a car designer. I translated this ambition to the creation of interior environments and ultimately completed both a Bachelor of Science degree in Interior Architecture and Master of Architecture from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. The study of architecture in Chicago proved to be an amazing experience. My studio space was on the top floor of The Sullivan Center, formerly the Carson Pirie Scott Building, and I could easily visit historical examples of designs from Frank Lloyd Wright, Renzo Piano, Mies Van Der Rohe, Stanley Tigerman, and others. Using the city as my classroom provided enduring inspiration.

I noticed, however, the lack of admiration of both women and architects of color in the Chicago scene and worldwide. When my professors suggested architects to use as inspiration, they were rarely African American, and never African American women. It was through my own investigations that I found images of architects similar to myself and my culture. Gradually, Paul Revere Williams became my Mies. Norma Merrick Sklarek became my F.L. Wright. Dina Griffith became my Renzo. Sharon Sutton could eloquently express my angst—preparing me for the suppression of the African American voice and visibility in the profession.

In my current position as Project Designer at Robert P. Madison International, I am surrounded by a rich history of architectural contributions from an African American owned firm, currently led by Sandra Madison. I make special attempts to show my face to those who are considering pursuing a design career, and try to persuade those with interest.

Currently, the United States has under 400 licensed African American women architects, making up just under .4% of the greater architect population. We have a desperate need for more representation. The diversity rates nationally in architecture are not keeping up with the changing communities that the profession is called upon to serve. African Americans comprise 13.9% of Ohio’s population. Strikingly, Ohio has 2,650 licensed architects, but only 63 are African American—that’s only 2% of the profession. This disparity has been evident since the inception of the profession. In 2015, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) initiated a deeper conversation about this matter. The AIA surveyed its members and supporters about the perception of diversity and also examined the relationship of diversity to success in the field. Its closing analysis suggested changes in hopes of creating greater equality and more balanced numbers. Communities and demographics are steadily changing, yet, the demographics of the designers of these same spaces are not keeping pace.

As the new president of the National Organization of Minority Architects Student Chapter (NOMAS) at Kent State University, Michelle Barrett is working towards creating and sustaining a space of support for students of color in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED). We recently discussed her ambitions to move past potential and into action in the architecture world’s quickly approaching future. Though the Kent State diversity numbers in the architecture and design programs seem to align with the national averages, the opportunity for a NOMAS chapter to spark a change is hopeful. The current minority students, and specifically Michelle, seem to recognize the importance of support for students of color at Kent State and are working towards change.

Michelle and I had the following conversation about her experience leading the NOMAS Chapter and her plans for the future.

Design Awards Michele and MichelleLeft to Right: Terrance Pitts (Turner Construction), Michelle Barrett, Michele Crawford, Teresa Giralt (Turner Construction), Amir Allenbey at the AIA Cleveland Design Awards

 

Michelle Barrett
Hometown: Gaithersburg, MD
Class / Year: Class of 2017, 4th year
Major: Architecture

 

MC: How did you hear about Kent State?

MB: As many black youth, I thought my future was in sports. I played soccer all of my life up until I tore my ACL during my senior year. Kent State was on my list of schools (for soccer) because my coach had past connections. After it was clear that I wouldn’t be playing sports in college, I had to approach that list of schools differently. Which one would provide the best academic value? Kent State was the answer.

 

MC: What inspired you to pursue the architecture path?

MB: I have always been drawn to art and design. Probably because of my mother; she is a graphic designer. But I never really wanted to be an artist. I wanted to have an impact on people’s everyday lives, to help people. I didn’t know how or what career would allow me to do that. At an away soccer tournament in Miami, a player’s mother took us on a tour of Downtown Miami. She gave us a history lesson on all the Art Deco inspired architecture and the type of events that happened there. I fell in love. At that point I realized how I could be creative, yet impactful, in society.

 

MC: Why NOMAS? Why now? 

MB: I did not previously know about NOMA/NOMAS until CAED Associate Dean Bill Willoughby initiated discussions on the topic. He was and continues to be an integral part of NOMAS here at Kent. After the initial informational presentations he gave students, a group of us students took the lead in formalizing the organization. The other students involved included: Torri Appling, Shelton Finch, and Zai Abdi. I personally took ownership of the process because I thought it was important to have an organization devoted to minority issues (diversity, inclusion, fellowship, etc) in relation to architecture. It’s a unique niche that cannot be fully realized in groups such as Black United Students (BUS).

 

MC: Have you ever felt as if you were treated unfairly because of your gender or race?

MB: On many occasions, people are surprised to hear about my academic achievements—be it my choice of major or my honors standing. After many years, their surprise no longer catches me off guard. However, I still feel an injustice when said individuals expect you to be 10x better than your peers. They hold you to different standards and it is unfair.

 

MC: What has been you favorite studio project?

MB: My favorite studio project was in Third Year Studio—The Media Center Library—a part of the Cleveland International School masterplan. It was the first time we interacted with real clients—the community, the students.

 

MC: As president what are the main goals that you have for the organization?

MB: My main goals for the organization include career development (educational and professional), community engagement in the Greater Cleveland area, and to ensure that the NOMAS voice continues to be heard as a legacy organization in the future CAED community.

 

***

Historically, the voice of the African American architect has been suppressed. However, as our world continues to change, the profession seems to be committed to making the field a more inclusive and welcoming place for all. Organizations like Design Diversity are working to push accountability in this matter. Design Diversity, an advisory committee which grew out of Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC), is committed to educating, connecting, and celebrating diversity in the design professions. Specifically focusing on African American and Latino communities, this group has specific goals of awareness to the larger design community with hopes of encouraging authentic, diverse views and considerations within and throughout the design process. Ultimately, Design Diversity and NOMA/NOMAS are promoting the importance of varied voices in educational and professional design communities.

 

Michele Crawford, Assoc. AIA, is a Project Designer at Robert P. Madison International, based in Cleveland, Ohio. Michele serves on a number of service organizations, including the Design Diversity Advisory Committee. In 2016, Michele was recognized with the Activism Award by AIA Cleveland. Follow Michele on Twitter @initiat_ed.

 

 

References:

NCARB By the Numbers 2015
http://www.ncarb.org/About-NCARB/NCARB-by-the-Numbers/~/media/Files/PDF/Special-Paper/2015NCARBbytheNumbers.ashx

African American Architects Directory
http://blackarch.uc.edu/

Diversity in the Profession of Architecture
http://www.aia.org/aiaucmp/groups/aia/documents/pdf/aiab108092.pdf

African Americans in Ohio
https://development.ohio.gov/files/research/P7003.pdf

 

10-24-16

Ryan Dewey | Oct 28

lectures_fall 2016_dewey

This week we welcome Ryan Dewey to our Fall Lecture Series. He will be speaking at the CUDC this Friday, October 28th,  at 12 PM. His talk is titled, “Landscaping the Deep Future”, is a land art project that speculates at how we can harness future climate conditions for human-geologic collaborations after human extinction by exploring formal relationships between supply chains and geologic forces. Supply chains already are a kind of geologic force in that they move natural materials faster and farther than nature ever could, this project makes use of that acceleration to prime landscapes for phase changes and activation at the transitions of deep future climactic regimes.

_MG_9660

 

GROOVESRyan Dewey does post-disciplinary translational research that crosses borders between expanded media, cognitive science, and environmental practice. He is the founder of Geologic Cognition Society, an open platform for collaboration focused on helping people experience nature in new ways. He is the author of the upcoming book Hacking Experience: New Tools for Artists from Cognitive Science (Punctum Books), and has also published in KERB, MONU, and Archinect on topics of urban design, landscape design, and spatial-emotional design. Dewey holds an MA from Case Western Reserve University where he served two appointments as visiting researcher in the Department of Cognitive Science exploring design cognition, ethnography, human attention, visual rhetoric and spatial cognition.

IMG_0885

Join us, Friday, October 28th, from 12 -1 PM. As always, this lecture is free and open to the public.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

 

09-13-16

INDEX Studio: Cleveland x Havana Report

Blog_Cuba Final for KSU 7

The INDEX studio examined the relationships between two cities–Cleveland, Ohio and Havana, Cuba. The 15-week studio took place in the spring of 2016 at Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC). By comparing these very different urban contexts, the studio provided new insights into familiar places and a better understanding of the challenges facing global cities.

Read and download the full report, written in English and Spanish, below.

Twelve graduate students generated proposals for a waterfront site in each of the two cities. The Cleveland site is the now-defunct Lakeshore Coal Plant, a monumental structure on a 60 acre site along the city’s eastern lakefront. The Havana counterpart is the Nico-Lopez Oil Refinery, a 500 acre facility still functioning as a refinery on the southeastern banks of Havana Bay.

Ash Pond ParkGraduate students Alexander Scott and Jordan Fitzgerald re-envisioned the Lakeshore Coal Plant as a regional destination for industrial arts preservation and production, located in close proximity to Cleveland’s University Circle arts and culture district.

Proposed Havana Bay Waterfront DevelopmentGraduate student Morgan Gundlach examined the opportunities to incorporate the 5′ (1.50 m) sea-level rise expected by 2100 by creating a dynamic ribbon of green spaces along Havana Bay’s waterfront.  

Students met with a range of design professionals and local experts while in Havana. These insights and direct observations gathered during the five day travel formed the basis of urban design proposals shown in the report. At the conclusion of the studio, students received feedback on their proposals from Cuban architects Ernesto Jimenez and Sofia Marquez Aguiar during the architects’ visit to Cleveland. The students’ design work will be exhibited in Havana, at the Fabrica de Arte Cubano, in Spring 2017.

The INDEX Studio is part of the curriculum for the Master of Architecture and Master of Urban Design programs in Kent State’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED). Kent State is committed to global education and expanding the cultural literacy of our students. Cuba offers a remarkably complex and locally relevant range of design opportunities. This initial studio is a first step toward establishing relationships with colleagues and collaborators in Cuba.

View and download the full report below:

Support for the travelling studio was generously provided by The Cleveland Foundation.

05-19-16

Save the Date | June 9 | Ernesto Jiménez & Sofía Márquez Aguiar

ernesto_sofia

Thursday, June 9th the CUDC will welcome Ernesto Jiménez and Sofía Márquez Aguiar, architects at the Fabrica de Arte Cubano (FAC) in Havana, Cuba. Ernesto and Sofia will present their architecture projects built in both Havana, Cuba and in Oporto, Portugal. Based on their experience as professional architects inside and outside Cuba, Ernesto and Sofia will share insights on potential collaboration between designers in Cleveland and Havana. The first half of the talk is titled, “Fabrica de Arte Cubano – A Never Ending Project”. They will discuss the history of the building that now serves as the headquarter of the cultural Fabrica de Arte Cubano (Cuban Art Factory) project. This path is indispensable to understand the logic of intervention from conceptualization to its ever-unfinished realization. Unfinished because the project has the idea of mutation embedded since its genesis. The mutation generated by the fusion of all the arts.

Click here to RSVP for the event. 

fabrica_de_arte0

FAC is an artistic project driven by the need to rescue, support and promote the work of artists from all branches of art such as film, music, dance, theater, visual arts, literature, photography, fashion, graphic design and architecture; that through their integration art / artist promote exchanges and direct approach between the public and the creator a massive scale.

The second half of the talk is titled, “Belomonte Studio, some projects”. This discussion contains part of the work done by Belomonte Studio during its ten years of existence, oriented to the development of various projects related to art, architecture and design, from a cross-sectional view; The studio was founded in 2004 by architects Ernesto Jimenez (Cuba) and Sofia Marques de Aguiar (Portugal), in the city of Porto, where they resided until 2013, then was established in Havana.

Ernesto Jiménez (La Habana, 1974)
Architect from Architecture Faculty, ISPJAE, (1996). Member of UNAIC and the Order of the Architects of Portugal (2009).
1996 – 1998> Department of Rehabilitation and Architectural Restoration of the National Center for Conservation, Restoration and Museology (CENCREM).
1999 – 2005> Company Filipe Oliveira Dias, architect.
2004> Foundation Belomonte Studio.
2007> Enterprise Vitrocsa and Jofebar.
2013> EICTV, San Antonio de los Baños. School of Cinema.
2013 – 2014> FAC, Cuban Art Factory.
Other works > Publications Grafic Design, Furniture Design and Architecture Photography.

Sofia Marques de Aguiar (Porto, 1973)
Architect> Art School of Porto (ESAP), (1998). Member of the Order of
Architects of Portugal (1998).
1993 – 2001> Atelier of architecture and urbanism, architect Manuel Marques de Aguiar.
1996 – 2005> CRUARB (urban rehabilitation of Porto as World Heritage city).
2004> Foundation of Belomonte Studio.
2013> EICTV San Antonio de los Baños, School of Cinema
2013 – 2014> FAC, Cuban Art Factory.
Other works> Painting, sculpture, illustration, jewelry, scenery and costume Design for Cinema

Visit our Eventbrite page to RSVP. 

Ernesto Jiménez and Sofía Márquez Aguiar
June 9, 2016
6-8 PM
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, 1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200, Cleveland, OH 44115

04-28-16

AIA Design Lecture Series | micro MARCRO – Eric Bunge

nARCHITECTS micro MACRO

The CUDC will be hosting an AIA Cleveland Event, Thursday, May 12, 2016. They welcome Eric Bunge of nARCHITECTS. Eric founded nARCHITECTS, with his partner Mimi Hoang in 1999 with the aim of addressing contemporary issues in architecture through conceptually driven, socially engaging and technologically innovative work. The letter ‘n’ represents a variable, indicating their interest in designing for a dynamic variety of experiences within a cohesive approach. In this spirit, they embrace challenges and scales of work ranging from buildings to public spaces to interiors, and across cultural, residential and commercial uses.

nA Eric Bunge & Mimi Hoang

Eric’s talk, titled “micro-MACRO” will address:

  • Humane living solutions in dense cities
  • Approaches to architecture / landscape
  • Responding to short & long-term climatic change
  • Unifying material, structure and enclosure

nA_M2_XYC_Design-Development_M2_ShiftedLayers_MirFinal_med_1700wide1

TIME - Doors Open at 5:30, Lecture 6:00-7:00

LOCATION - CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44115

Drinks and hors d’oeuvres will be provided prior to the lecture courtesy of the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative and AIA Cleveland.

This program is approved for 1.0 HSW Learning Units

COST-

AIA Members: $5

Non-Members: $20

KSU CUDC Students: Free

For more information and to register click here. 

*Stick around after the talk and view this year’s students capstone projects in a small reception. 

 

03-07-16

Sai Sinbondit Lecture | March 11

circulation mapping

Migration Flow

This Friday, March 11th, we welcome Sai Sinbondit to our Spring Lecture Series. His talk is titled, “In Between Places”, which will talk about how his research uses data mapping and visualization to leverage architecture and art as vehicles to explore the world and its dynamic relationship between people, cultures, systems and settlement. It is in the context of displacement, such as refugees, homelessness and migration that drives his work.

DisplacementsDisplacements

Sai received a Masters of Architecture from Syracuse University and graduated with honors in the Bachelor of Fine Art program in Painting and Printmaking as well as receiving a Bachelor of Science in Philosophy of Religions from the University of Toledo. He has spent some time abroad living and working with organizations such as UNICEF, UNHCR and USAID, in various countries such as Turkey, El Salvador, Thailand, India, France, Italy and Darfur. While maintaining his professional work as a designer at Bialosky Cleveland, Sai holds a faculty position at the Cleveland Institute of Art and sustains a personal research practice.

The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.

 

02-29-16

2016 COLDSCAPES//Adapt Competition Winners

adapt comp

On behalf of The Center for Outdoor Living Design (COLD) and the esteemed competition jury, we are pleased to announce the winners and honorable mentions selected for this year’s COLDSCAPES//Adapt Competition! The competition sought submissions that creatively respond to the challenges posed by volatile weather conditions in winter cities.

The three winning entries and six honorable mentions were selected by a panel of jurors from the United States and Canada, representing multiple disciplines, including architecture, landscape architecture, and urban planning.

Winners:
1st Place:
Climate Canopy | Thomas Hinterholzer – Innsbruck, Austria

climate_canopy_3
This project operates within the notions of comfort and energy. It proposes individual energy autonomy and takes a speculative approach in order to link urban energy networks with cold-cliamte outdoor activity. The anticipated technological assets are hydrogen and graphene. Hydrogen is the most efficient lifting gas with a lifting capacity of 1.2kg/m³. Its energy content is 3 times higher than fuel oil or natural gas and it can be produced efficiently and stored safely with new graphene materials. One atom thick graphene sheets are 95% transparent and 200 times stronger than steel. Developed canopies harvest renewable electricity from hydrogen, which can be used for the existing buildings. Various configurations of the canopy are used not only to produce electricity, but to overcome local uncomfortable climatic conditions in order to attain more possibilities for outdoor activity. Because the canopy structures are integrated within the existing built environment they work on the scale of a parcel or a block. It will bring the energy generation into a dialogue with outdoor comfort. This ambitious endeavor has the potential to change the energy household and urban activity of a whole city.

2nd Place:
Threshold | Catherine Joseph – Auburn, Maine

THRESHOLD_1

Click to view larger.THRESHOLD_3

Freeze/Thaw cycles in the Northeast are inevitable. With these micro-scale processes come ideal conditions for the subgrade build-up of ice lenses that displace soil and fracture rock through a process called “ice heaving”. This process is notorious for demolishing roads and cracking building foundations. Portland, Maine serves as a representative of urban areas that endure widely variable winter conditions. The physics behind frost heaves is predictable. By leveraging the anticipation of the formation of ice lenses, THRESHOLD is a series of independent processes activated by the cyclic build-up of snow and ice that is comes with the freeze and thaw cycles of Maine winters. Facades expand and retract according to the snow build-up, increasing the volume of the air-gap insulation. Walkways warm as the frost heaves activate piezoelectric panels that power underground heating coils. The vertical forces caused by the ice lenses can also be tailored to artistic endeavors – underground organs play the sounds of friction and temperature. Water forced to the surface is directed to ice pools, where ice sculptures are created and encouraged by the upward thrust of the freeze/thaw cycles. In each instance, it is the threshold between frozen and unfrozen that triggers the adaptive urban features.

3rd Place:
The Eddy | Tiffany Chen and Matthew Enos – Minneapolis, Minnesotawinter_render

final diagram

Click to view larger. 

Winter is isolating. It severs links between individuals and communities. Minneapolis is accustomed to this. The Stone Arch Bridge in Minneapolis serves as a popular link between neighborhoods, and facilitates encounters. However these opportunities are lost during the extreme Minnesota winter, when few people regularly cross the bridge, due to brutal wind chills. The Eddy acts as respite from winter, not removal. The principal aspect of the design is a series of louvred railing systems. Louvres on the northern face of the bridge close or open, depending on season, to block the bittern winds from the Mississippi below. Thus, they create a calmer, more amenable environment for winter users. The illuminated bridge acts as a beacon in the darkest point of the year. Minimal structural supports modify the rhythm the louvres create, while ‘eddies’ punctuate the length of the bridge. Three minor eddies provide integrated semi-sheltered seating, while the large, main eddy provides a screened space with integrated seating and observation areas.  The eddy establishes the bridge as a winter destination and experience just as much as it is during summer.

Read more…

02-08-16

Felipe Correa Lecture | February 11

532869

This week we will be holding our Spring Lecture Series on Thursday, February 11th, at 12:15 PM, here at the CUDC. We welcome architect, urbanist, and Harvard Associate Professor, Felipe Correa. Felipe’s talk, “Urbanism Primer: Approaches to City Design in the 21st Century”, will provide an overview of the most salient modes of practice currently being applied to the contemporary city. By presenting a series of projects that range in scale and ambition, the lecture showcases the rich instrumental diversity afforded by design and its ability to confront diverse urban scenarios.

correa__mex_strategiesProject Constellation for Mexico City. From Mexico City: Between Geometry and Geography. Courtesy of Felipe Correa

Felipe Correa is Associate Professor in the Department of Urban Planning and Design and Director of the Urban Design Degree Program at Harvard University. A New York-based architect and urbanist, Correa works at the confluence of Architecture, Urbanism and Infrastructure. Through his design practice, Somatic Collaborative, he has developed design projects and consultancies with the public and private sector in multiple cities and regions across the globe, including Mexico City, New Orleans, Quito, Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Seoul among many others.

If you can’t make it to our afternoon lecture, Felipe will be also speaking at the Kent State University Main Campus, Kiva Auditorium at 6:00 PM, Thursday, February 11th. His lecture is titled, “Elective Affinities: Architecture Across Scales”. Both are free and open to the public.

 

09-29-15

The Public Library: Designing a Community Asset

Recently, HBM Architects received national attention for their leading-edge library projects. The CUDC’s new Post-Graduate Fellow, Sam Friesema, worked for the firm and had a hand in the recognized projects. This is his story about his involvement and how he plans to bring his expertise to our work with the Cleveland Public Library and their CPL150 Community Vision Plan.


Before joining the CUDC, I had the privilege of working for HBM Architects for 4 ½ years. HBM specializes in library planning and design and has worked with over 300 libraries throughout the country. Libraries are in an exciting period of exploration where traditional library services are transitioning as technologies rapidly alter information access in our society. Libraries are becoming community centers and neighborhood technology hubs. Instead of housing books they now house activities, workshops, cafés, performance spaces, interactive learning areas for all ages, and yes, still a few books.

Libraries are an integral part of any city. As a public amenity, libraries build upon input from the community to construct spaces which meet local needs. While we can only guess what the library of the future might look like, several new projects give a glimpse into cutting edge library design. Four HBM projects recently received national attention for their innovative architectural visions of the contemporary library. I was fortunate to work on all of these projects at varying capacities.

hbm projects

Click on project name for more images and information:

  1. EAST ROSWELL BRANCH LIBRARY – ATLANTA-FULTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
  2. NORTHSIDE LIBRARY JEFFERSON – MADISON REGIONAL LIBRARY
  3. SOUTHEAST DAVIDSON LIBRARY & COMMUNITY CENTER – NASHVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY
  4. WARRENSVILLE HEIGHTS BRANCH LIBRARY – CUYAHOGA COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY

Projects range in size and scope, from adaptive reuse to new construction. While each project is very unique, themes start to emerge as to where library services are headed: Open floor plans, flexible meeting spaces, technology saturation, less book shelves, casual seating areas, maker spaces, interactive early childhood literacy areas, all act to inspire the next generation of public library users.

Looking ahead, I am excited by the CUDC’s involvement with Cleveland Public Library’s CPL150 Community Vision Plan and hope to continue contributing to the library world in my new role here at the CUDC.

-Sam Friesema, Graduate Fellow