04-28-16

AIA Design Lecture Series | micro MARCRO – Eric Bunge

nARCHITECTS micro MACRO

The CUDC will be hosting an AIA Cleveland Event, Thursday, May 12, 2016. They welcome Eric Bunge of nARCHITECTS. Eric founded nARCHITECTS, with his partner Mimi Hoang in 1999 with the aim of addressing contemporary issues in architecture through conceptually driven, socially engaging and technologically innovative work. The letter ‘n’ represents a variable, indicating their interest in designing for a dynamic variety of experiences within a cohesive approach. In this spirit, they embrace challenges and scales of work ranging from buildings to public spaces to interiors, and across cultural, residential and commercial uses.

nA Eric Bunge & Mimi Hoang

Eric’s talk, titled “micro-MACRO” will address:

  • Humane living solutions in dense cities
  • Approaches to architecture / landscape
  • Responding to short & long-term climatic change
  • Unifying material, structure and enclosure

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TIME - Doors Open at 5:30, Lecture 6:00-7:00

LOCATION - CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44115

Drinks and hors d’oeuvres will be provided prior to the lecture courtesy of the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative and AIA Cleveland.

This program is approved for 1.0 HSW Learning Units

COST-

AIA Members: $5

Non-Members: $20

KSU CUDC Students: Free

For more information and to register click here. 

*Stick around after the talk and view this year’s students capstone projects in a small reception. 

 

03-07-16

Sai Sinbondit Lecture | March 11

circulation mapping

Migration Flow

This Friday, March 11th, we welcome Sai Sinbondit to our Spring Lecture Series. His talk is titled, “In Between Places”, which will talk about how his research uses data mapping and visualization to leverage architecture and art as vehicles to explore the world and its dynamic relationship between people, cultures, systems and settlement. It is in the context of displacement, such as refugees, homelessness and migration that drives his work.

DisplacementsDisplacements

Sai received a Masters of Architecture from Syracuse University and graduated with honors in the Bachelor of Fine Art program in Painting and Printmaking as well as receiving a Bachelor of Science in Philosophy of Religions from the University of Toledo. He has spent some time abroad living and working with organizations such as UNICEF, UNHCR and USAID, in various countries such as Turkey, El Salvador, Thailand, India, France, Italy and Darfur. While maintaining his professional work as a designer at Bialosky Cleveland, Sai holds a faculty position at the Cleveland Institute of Art and sustains a personal research practice.

The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.

 

02-29-16

2016 COLDSCAPES//Adapt Competition Winners

adapt comp

On behalf of The Center for Outdoor Living Design (COLD) and the esteemed competition jury, we are pleased to announce the winners and honorable mentions selected for this year’s COLDSCAPES//Adapt Competition! The competition sought submissions that creatively respond to the challenges posed by volatile weather conditions in winter cities.

The three winning entries and six honorable mentions were selected by a panel of jurors from the United States and Canada, representing multiple disciplines, including architecture, landscape architecture, and urban planning.

Winners:
1st Place:
Climate Canopy | Thomas Hinterholzer – Innsbruck, Austria

climate_canopy_3
This project operates within the notions of comfort and energy. It proposes individual energy autonomy and takes a speculative approach in order to link urban energy networks with cold-cliamte outdoor activity. The anticipated technological assets are hydrogen and graphene. Hydrogen is the most efficient lifting gas with a lifting capacity of 1.2kg/m³. Its energy content is 3 times higher than fuel oil or natural gas and it can be produced efficiently and stored safely with new graphene materials. One atom thick graphene sheets are 95% transparent and 200 times stronger than steel. Developed canopies harvest renewable electricity from hydrogen, which can be used for the existing buildings. Various configurations of the canopy are used not only to produce electricity, but to overcome local uncomfortable climatic conditions in order to attain more possibilities for outdoor activity. Because the canopy structures are integrated within the existing built environment they work on the scale of a parcel or a block. It will bring the energy generation into a dialogue with outdoor comfort. This ambitious endeavor has the potential to change the energy household and urban activity of a whole city.

2nd Place:
Threshold | Catherine Joseph – Auburn, Maine

THRESHOLD_1

Click to view larger.THRESHOLD_3

Freeze/Thaw cycles in the Northeast are inevitable. With these micro-scale processes come ideal conditions for the subgrade build-up of ice lenses that displace soil and fracture rock through a process called “ice heaving”. This process is notorious for demolishing roads and cracking building foundations. Portland, Maine serves as a representative of urban areas that endure widely variable winter conditions. The physics behind frost heaves is predictable. By leveraging the anticipation of the formation of ice lenses, THRESHOLD is a series of independent processes activated by the cyclic build-up of snow and ice that is comes with the freeze and thaw cycles of Maine winters. Facades expand and retract according to the snow build-up, increasing the volume of the air-gap insulation. Walkways warm as the frost heaves activate piezoelectric panels that power underground heating coils. The vertical forces caused by the ice lenses can also be tailored to artistic endeavors – underground organs play the sounds of friction and temperature. Water forced to the surface is directed to ice pools, where ice sculptures are created and encouraged by the upward thrust of the freeze/thaw cycles. In each instance, it is the threshold between frozen and unfrozen that triggers the adaptive urban features.

3rd Place:
The Eddy | Tiffany Chen and Matthew Enos – Minneapolis, Minnesotawinter_render

final diagram

Click to view larger. 

Winter is isolating. It severs links between individuals and communities. Minneapolis is accustomed to this. The Stone Arch Bridge in Minneapolis serves as a popular link between neighborhoods, and facilitates encounters. However these opportunities are lost during the extreme Minnesota winter, when few people regularly cross the bridge, due to brutal wind chills. The Eddy acts as respite from winter, not removal. The principal aspect of the design is a series of louvred railing systems. Louvres on the northern face of the bridge close or open, depending on season, to block the bittern winds from the Mississippi below. Thus, they create a calmer, more amenable environment for winter users. The illuminated bridge acts as a beacon in the darkest point of the year. Minimal structural supports modify the rhythm the louvres create, while ‘eddies’ punctuate the length of the bridge. Three minor eddies provide integrated semi-sheltered seating, while the large, main eddy provides a screened space with integrated seating and observation areas.  The eddy establishes the bridge as a winter destination and experience just as much as it is during summer.

Read more…

02-08-16

Felipe Correa Lecture | February 11

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This week we will be holding our Spring Lecture Series on Thursday, February 11th, at 12:15 PM, here at the CUDC. We welcome architect, urbanist, and Harvard Associate Professor, Felipe Correa. Felipe’s talk, “Urbanism Primer: Approaches to City Design in the 21st Century”, will provide an overview of the most salient modes of practice currently being applied to the contemporary city. By presenting a series of projects that range in scale and ambition, the lecture showcases the rich instrumental diversity afforded by design and its ability to confront diverse urban scenarios.

correa__mex_strategiesProject Constellation for Mexico City. From Mexico City: Between Geometry and Geography. Courtesy of Felipe Correa

Felipe Correa is Associate Professor in the Department of Urban Planning and Design and Director of the Urban Design Degree Program at Harvard University. A New York-based architect and urbanist, Correa works at the confluence of Architecture, Urbanism and Infrastructure. Through his design practice, Somatic Collaborative, he has developed design projects and consultancies with the public and private sector in multiple cities and regions across the globe, including Mexico City, New Orleans, Quito, Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Seoul among many others.

If you can’t make it to our afternoon lecture, Felipe will be also speaking at the Kent State University Main Campus, Kiva Auditorium at 6:00 PM, Thursday, February 11th. His lecture is titled, “Elective Affinities: Architecture Across Scales”. Both are free and open to the public.

 

09-29-15

The Public Library: Designing a Community Asset

Recently, HBM Architects received national attention for their leading-edge library projects. The CUDC’s new Post-Graduate Fellow, Sam Friesema, worked for the firm and had a hand in the recognized projects. This is his story about his involvement and how he plans to bring his expertise to our work with the Cleveland Public Library and their CPL150 Community Vision Plan.


Before joining the CUDC, I had the privilege of working for HBM Architects for 4 ½ years. HBM specializes in library planning and design and has worked with over 300 libraries throughout the country. Libraries are in an exciting period of exploration where traditional library services are transitioning as technologies rapidly alter information access in our society. Libraries are becoming community centers and neighborhood technology hubs. Instead of housing books they now house activities, workshops, cafés, performance spaces, interactive learning areas for all ages, and yes, still a few books.

Libraries are an integral part of any city. As a public amenity, libraries build upon input from the community to construct spaces which meet local needs. While we can only guess what the library of the future might look like, several new projects give a glimpse into cutting edge library design. Four HBM projects recently received national attention for their innovative architectural visions of the contemporary library. I was fortunate to work on all of these projects at varying capacities.

hbm projects

Click on project name for more images and information:

  1. EAST ROSWELL BRANCH LIBRARY – ATLANTA-FULTON PUBLIC LIBRARY
  2. NORTHSIDE LIBRARY JEFFERSON – MADISON REGIONAL LIBRARY
  3. SOUTHEAST DAVIDSON LIBRARY & COMMUNITY CENTER – NASHVILLE PUBLIC LIBRARY
  4. WARRENSVILLE HEIGHTS BRANCH LIBRARY – CUYAHOGA COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY

Projects range in size and scope, from adaptive reuse to new construction. While each project is very unique, themes start to emerge as to where library services are headed: Open floor plans, flexible meeting spaces, technology saturation, less book shelves, casual seating areas, maker spaces, interactive early childhood literacy areas, all act to inspire the next generation of public library users.

Looking ahead, I am excited by the CUDC’s involvement with Cleveland Public Library’s CPL150 Community Vision Plan and hope to continue contributing to the library world in my new role here at the CUDC.

-Sam Friesema, Graduate Fellow

09-22-15

Miguel Coyula Lecture | October 7th

miguel coyula_2

Miguel Coyula is an architect, urban planner, and professor at the University of Havana. He will give a comprehensive overview of Havana from its origins to the present, ending with an open question shared by many people these day: What kind of city will Havana be in the coming years?

The event will be held at:

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
Kent State University
Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, Ohio 44115
Directions to the CUDC

Following Professor Coyula’s talk, there will be a light dinner catered by Earth Bistro Café featuring contemporary American cuisine with a Cuban flair. This event is free and made possible by KSU President Emeritus Lester Lefton, but REGISTRATION is required.

For any inquiries regarding the event, please contact the CUDC.

 

05-14-15

EASTSIDE HUB multi-family living for a multicultural population

alena_miller_Handout

Congratulations to Kent State CUDC graduate student Alena Miller who took 3rd place in the 2015 Cleveland State University Real Estate Market Analysis Competition. Alena competed in a field of 20 students. Her project focused on the design of a community to support an influx of immigrants and refugees, in accordance with resettlement criteria outlined by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. Using a site in Cleveland (E. 61 Street, just south of Chester Avenue) she developed a plan for 180 apartment units plus 156,000 SF of urban agriculture. The inclusion of  urban farming generated 25 on-site jobs for the refugee community.

PowerPoint Presentation

Alena’s project is especially timely, given the large and growing numbers of people who are forced to flee their homelands each year due to political conflicts and violence. Greater Cleveland receives approximately 600-700 refugees a yeara number that could grow if planning, policies, and programs are in place to support these populations.

Her work represents a unique investment opportunity that advocates for the future of Cleveland. Congratulations, Alena!

04-20-15

Spring Lecture Series | Terry Schwarz

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CUDC LUNCH TALK

Terry Schwarz

Friday, April 24th 12-1pm

CUDC Conference Room, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200

Event is free and all are welcome!

Click here to RSVP.

Cuba–hasta siempre

Havana, Cuba is one of the most beautiful cities in the world, despite decades of disinvestment in its historic architecture and civic infrastructure. As diplomatic relations begin to improve between the US and Cuba and the long-standing trade embargo is lifted, foreign investment will pour into Havana. The rapid influx of new money and ideas may help to stabilize Havana, but will also inevitably disrupt and transform the city in unpredictable ways.

Last month, Doug Steidl, Dean of the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State, and Terry Schwarz, Director of KSU’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, traveled to Cuba at the invitation of Hiram College and the Joaquín Weiss Institute. At Friday’s lunch talk, Terry will discuss some emerging opportunities for design and urban regeneration in Havana.

To RSVP, please click here. (RSVPs encouraged, but not required.)

For more information, please contact us at cudc@kent.edu or (216) 357-3434.

04-14-15

Spring Lecture Series | MAKER

Maker_new_560

CUDC LUNCH TALK

M A K E R // Westleigh Harper and Michael Horton
Friday, April 17th
12-1pm
CUDC Conference Room, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Event is free and all are welcome!
Click here to RSVP.

Elastic Limits

MAKER is a Cleveland-based design studio established in 2011 by Westleigh Harper and Michael Horton. The firm was founded on the principle of responsibly contributing to the development of the City’s urban fabric. Through design, construction and planning exercises, they seek to uncover the inherent potentials specific to each site while progressing the design culture of the region forward. In addition, factors such as project timeline, budget, site constraints and zoning restrictions are viewed as generative attributes. This method has instigated new opportunities within each project, allowing their studio to produce thought-provoking work and contribute to the success of our Cleveland neighborhoods.

Their lecture, titled “Elastic Limits”, will follow the trajectory of their growing practice from its inception in 2011 to the present. Maximizing density, material exploration, and responding to client and zoning challenges are common themes throughout their body of work and have served as the guiding ethos behind their design process.

To RSVP, please click here. (RSVPs encouraged, but not required.)

For more information, please contact us at cudc@kent.edu or (216) 357-3434.

 

04-07-15

Spring Lecture Series | Jack Bialosky Jr.

Jack Bialosky

CUDC LUNCH TALK

Jack Bialosky Jr | Senior Principal and Managing Partner, Bialosky + Partners Architects
Friday, April 10th
12-1pm
CUDC Conference Room, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Event is free and all are welcome!

Staying Out of the Niche: How to keep your firm fresh and relevant in an ever-changing world

The talk will explore the diversity and evolution of the work and culture of Bialosky + Partners Architects. A talk in three parts; first Jack will take a brief walk through the progression of major projects in the firm’s 60 year history. Each design represents a milestone in the firm’s history and contains key advancements and knowledge that builds and informs the next work. This also provides a window into the progressing culture of the firm. Second, Jack will discuss how to build a great firm culture and what talents, skills, and qualities the firm looks for in its staff. The talk will conclude with a quick presentation of current work and a picture of where the firm is headed over the next 10 years.

Learning objectives include the following:

1. Why diversity of project types and scale are more fun
2. Winning new project types through collaboration
3. Applying design knowledge across various project types
4. How to build a great firm culture
5. What it takes to secure and advance in a position at a great firm


BIO:

Jack A. Bialosky, Jr., AIA, LEED AP, leads one of the Midwest’s most successful and collaborative architecture firms, Bialosky + Partners Architects.

Jack A. Bialosky, Jr., the son of a prominent Cleveland architect, assumed leadership of a firm widely known for its modern residential and religious projects. After working at Kallman McKinnell & Wood Architects in Boston, Jack returned to Cleveland to initiate 20+ years of stewardship and transformation of his father’s small local firm, Bialosky + Partners Architects. The firm is known for the quality of its designs, the trust of their clients, the longevity of its staff, and the diversity of its portfolio.

In addition to design awards, the firm garnered the 2013 Northcoast 99 Award that recognizes the highest ranked workplaces in Northeast Ohio across all sectors.  In 2009, the firm was recognized by the American Institute of Architects as an AIA Ohio Gold Medal Firm, the highest honor awarded by its peers, in recognition of great depth and breadth, a collaborative environment, and having a cumulative effect on the profession over a substantial period of time. Jack’s initiative to seek out other collaborative designers and artists has resulted in ongoing partnerships with designers such as Maya Lin, David Moss, and Architecture Research Office.

For more information, please contact the CUDC at cudc@kent.edu or call (216) 357-3434.

03-30-15

We’re Hiring! Part-Time, Admin Position

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Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) is hiring a part-time Business Manager position for our downtown Cleveland office. The job responsibilities include administrative and clerical assistance for the CUDC’s professional practice and academic programs.

POSITION DESCRIPTION:

Administrative Clerk | Part-time position, Monday- Friday 8:30 am – 12:30 pm

FOR A FULL JOB DESCRIPTION AND TO APPLY ONLINE:

  1. Visit Kent State’s Career Postings Sitehttps://jobs.kent.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/frameset/Frameset.jsp?time=1427740048253
  2. Enter Position Number: 998191
  3. Click “SEARCH”
  4. Click “View” under Administrative Clerk
  5. Click “APPLY FOR THIS POSTING”
  6. In addition to applying online through Kent State’s Career Posting Site; please email resume to Terry Schwarz at tschwarz@kent.edu

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

  • Provides part-time administrative, budget, and clerical assistance to the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative unit in downtown Cleveland. This position is housed in the downtown Cleveland office.
  • Coordinates and monitors CUDC budget and expense accounts.
  • Coordinates workflow and schedule to ensure deadlines are met, priorities are recognized, and policies/procedures are followed.
  • Assists with occasional office functions to include set up and clean up.
  • Schedules university facilities for academic and nonacademic events (e.g., meetings, dinners, parties, etc.); reserves locations, dates and times; assists clients with the planning of events (e.g., the types of tables); completes necessary forms; enforces university and scheduling procedures.
  • Answers, screens, and routes incoming telephone calls from multiple lines, takes messages, may send messages through electronic mail, places and logs long distance calls.
  • Greets and screens students, faculty, professional staff, administrators, and visitors, directs to appropriate location or person; may distribute, explain, and/or collect forms, pamphlets, or other informational documents.
  • Provides general and specialized information to students, faculty, professional staff, administrators, visitors, or callers regarding policy and procedures of University or department, campus locations, University events, class times and cancellations, telephone numbers, etc.; refers questions requiring more knowledge or data to appropriate person.
  • Sorts and distributes incoming mail for department; prepares bulk mailings.
  • May type basic items such as memos, schedules, telephone listings, envelopes, labels, data cards and occasional letters or reports from draft using typewriter or word processor. May perform other clerical duties such as filing, producing photocopies, sending and receiving facsimiles, and arranging for repairs.
  • Maintains various logs (e.g., parcels, visitors, keys, etc.), calendar of events, and/or appointment book.
  • Must pass a security check.

ABOUT CUDC:

The Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) is a community design and research division of the College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) at Kent State University. Based in downtown Cleveland, the CUDC provides technical design assistance to communities throughout the northeast Ohio region, conducts research into urgent and emerging areas of design practice, and offers a variety of public education, and design advocacy programs.

 

03-06-15

Spring Lecture Series | Jennifer Coleman

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Where do the intersections of urban design, architecture and entrepreneurship merge? Find out Friday, March 13, 2015 as we welcome Jennifer Coleman to our Spring Lecture Series.

As an architect & entrepreneur Jennifer Coleman has over 24 years experience in the field of architecture and has managed the design, bidding and construction observation of a diverse array of building projects. Her company, Jennifer Coleman Creative LLC, is dedicated to improving life in the city through smart design, combining a traditional architectural design and planning practice with community engagement and history gathering and website and graphic design. She is also the founder and CEO of CityProwl, a company producing urban walking-tours that can be downloaded from the Internet to digital media players for self-led tours. Jennifer received a $30,000 startup grant from the Cleveland Foundation’s Civic Innovation Lab.

Ms. Coleman is Chair of both the Cleveland Landmarks Commission and Downtown/Flats District Design Review Committee and was appointed to the Mayor’s 2010 Group Plan Commission. She is a past board member of the Ohio Board of Building Standards. An avid civic volunteer, she is past president of the Cleveland Chapter of Links, Inc. and has served as an officer on the boards of the Cleveland Botanical Garden and the Cleveland Chapter of the American Institute of Architects. She is also a board member of LAND Studio, the Cleveland Arts Prize, Cleveland International Film Festival and the Downtown Cleveland Alliance.

As always our lectures are free and open to the public. Join us from 12-1 PM on Friday, March 13th, at the CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200, Cleveland, OH 44115.

 

02-23-15

Spring Lecture Series | Samuel Friesema

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We know it’s still cold outside, but our Spring Lecture Series is really heating up! This Friday we welcome former student, Samuel Friesema.

His lecture lecture will focus on his recent thesis proposal, Networks of Urban Acupuncture, which explored methods of injecting large amounts of new program into existing built-out contexts through interdisciplinary methods that combine architecture, urban theory, and policy. The lecture will feature an overview of Friesema’s thesis research and proposed design solution as well as speculative projections on how the research can be further developed and implemented in practice.

Friesema_1

Samuel Friesema is an urban and architectural thinker and designer. He has over eleven years of professional practice experience in the field of architecture. He has worked at award winning firms and has several award winning projects. He has recently earned a Masters of Urban Design from the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (Kent State University).

Friesema_2

As always our lectures are free and open to the public. Join us from 12-1 PM on Monday, February 27th from 12-1 PM, at the CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200, Cleveland, OH 44115.

02-09-15

CUDC Fall Studio Teams Compete in MidTown Design Competition

nykamp and gates image_cropAerial rendering of a development proposal for Cleveland’s MidTown District created by CUDC graduate students Matthew Nykamp and Heather Flick. The concept, named “Deeply Rooted,” proposed a public green space network overlaid on broadband data infrastructure.  

First year graduate students at the CUDC kicked-off their urban design studio experience this fall with a local design competition. Focused on a segment of Cleveland’s Health-Tech Corridor, the competition involved several local partners and offered a $1,000 cash prize provided by Geis Companies.

Stretching along three miles of Cleveland’s Euclid Avenue, the Health-Tech Corridor (HTC) served as the geographic scope for the studio. The HTC is a 1,600 acre swath of near east side neighborhoods, including healthcare institutions, business incubators, academic centers, and over 123 high-tech companies, all anchored by a bus rapid transit (BRT) line.

AU14 Studio Syllabus-3

The competition’s primary focus sites lie within the broader Health-Tech Corridor, clustered between E. 55th Street and E. 70th Street in the MidTown neighborhood. Students were given a tour of the area by knowledgeable community partners, including: Jeff Epstein, Director of the Health-Tech Corridor; Maura Maresh, Development Director at Geis Companies; and Will Warren, Finance Analyst at the City of Cleveland’s Department Economic Development.

Five student teams competed in the studio’s design competition. Each project employed a unique perspective on the opportunities presented by the site. Although all teams produced strong proposals for the jury to consider, ultimately Team RED was selected as the prize winner.

Students will present their work again at an event organized by Heath-Tech Corridor at JumpStart on February 26, 2014. If you’re interested in learning more about the upcoming event or the student projects, please contact studio instructor David Jurca.

Final slide presentations from all teams are shown below:

 

From Grey to Green | Clarisse Gates, James Lennon

Graduate students Clarisse Gates and James Lennon envision a holistic development strategy focused on improving the health of MidTown employees and surrounding residents. From Grey to Green identifies measurable goals for green infrastructure, providing attractive and functional amenities to spur new development.

 

MidtownLink | Said Abiakl

Exploring the site’s potential to connect adjacent neighborhoods, MidtownLink weaves a multi-use trail through variously scaled public spaces. Said Abiakl conducted a rigorous analysis of climatic conditions, storm water strategies, and programmatic arrangements to arrive at an iconic circular form to anchor the mixed-use development.

 

Mi[xe]d Town | Tyler Middendorf

Through research on the district’s historic development patterns, Tyler Middendorf derived the insight that past developments were too focused on a single industry. Comprised of businesses primarily based on the automotive industry, the district fell victim to volatile global market forces, resulting in the vacancy we see today. In an effort to prevent similar collapses in the future, Mi[xe]d Town diversifies entertainment, mobility, and employment opportunities, creating a resilient community.

 

MidTown Beat | Brittany Ballish, Andrew Foster

Building on existing assets within MidTown, Brittany and Andrew aim to grow the various rhythms of activity in the neighborhood. A proposed music therapy facility leverages the area’s music identity, punctuated by the nearby Cleveland Agora. Public spaces create areas of respite while integrating multiple levels of entertainment. Transit-oriented design elements reconnect Midtown with Downtown Cleveland, universities, and healthcare campuses. Streetscape enhancements and public arcades respond to the need for north-south connections to enable future growth and neighbor relations.

 

Deeply Rooted | Heather Flick, Matthew Nykamp

“The Deeper the Network, The Greater the Community” is the tagline for Matthew Nykamp and Heather Flick’s proposal, which aims to grow rich digital and physical social spaces. Leveraging the area’s broadband fiber infrastructure, Deeply Rooted attracts both new technology businesses and current neighborhood residents to interact in a dynamic public realm.

 

RED | Turki Alosimi, Mykie Hrusovski, Katelyn Milius
* Competition Winning Project

RED‘s goal is to create a technology-focused environment that promotes healthy living, celebrates diversity, fosters collaboration, and provides opportunities for growth on site. The project team addressed this goal by creating a flexible design strategy, rather than rigid master plan, which empowers nearby residents to climb up the ladder of success.

Team RED also created a stop-motion animation, which portrays an engaging story of two people working in the neighborhood.

12-23-14

Student Perspective | Jordan Charles | Urban Proxy

We recently interviewed Master of Architecture (MArch) student, Jordan Charles, about his independent studio project “Urban Proxy”. Read our interview below to learn more about this unique project.

jordancharles_1

Hi Jordan, introduce yourself, what is your background?

My name is Jordan Charles, most of my friends know me as Peezy. I like to consider myself an “architect in training” striving to acquire his Master of Architecture during the day and a superhero at night. I pretty much have the same profile as some other individuals in the field – jack of all trades, master of none. However, I do take pride in my drawing abilities. While they aren’t where I’d like them to be they are good enough to allow me to make sense of my ideas and transfer them from my thoughts to paper.

What studio was this project for?

“Urban Proxy” was my final project for the independent studio I had taken up to fulfill the final requirements for my MArch. I had derived from the typical trajectory for the CUDC’s MArch program due to conflicts with my summer schedule and the required summer studio. So instead of taking the summer studio, I pushed the studio back to the following fall semester which is where it had morphed into an independent studio. However, I am pleased with how the adjustment worked out. I believe the independent studio gave me the freedom necessary to create “Urban Proxy”.

27_560How did you come to choose your topic?

“Urban Proxy” embodies a lot of personal beliefs I have in regards to design and architecture. People are in part defined by their experiences and architecture provides a stage for experiences to occur, so in theory architecture defines people. I wanted this project to provide a stage where positive experiences could occur for individuals that may feel they didn’t have a proper place within the city.

At the root, what is “Urban Proxy” about?

The genesis of Urban Proxy initiated with the intent of devising a scheme that resisted a static nature in search of a proposal that could be primarily flexible. The idea of flexibility sparked a desire to devise a plan to produce both programmatic and architectural elements that were freed from shackles. Change occurs more frequently than ever before and as society (thus the city) change, more should be expected from our environments. To be able to keep up with the changes, adaptability is a trait critical to designs that intend to remain relevant. Read more…