12-08-16

Advocating for Diversity: A Conversation with Michelle Barrett of NOMAS

michele crawford cropMichele Crawford presents her architectural research at the 2014 Design Diversity Powered by PechaKucha event in Cleveland, Ohio

Michele Crawford from Architecture firm Robert P. Madison International speaks with Michelle Barrett, the new president of the National Organization of Minority Architects Student Chapter (NOMAS) at Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design

by Michele Crawford

My inspiration to become an architect emerged from my educational journey. I did not have many architectural influences prior to my start on the path to architecture. My career goal was to become a car designer. I translated this ambition to the creation of interior environments and ultimately completed both a Bachelor of Science degree in Interior Architecture and Master of Architecture from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. The study of architecture in Chicago proved to be an amazing experience. My studio space was on the top floor of The Sullivan Center, formerly the Carson Pirie Scott Building, and I could easily visit historical examples of designs from Frank Lloyd Wright, Renzo Piano, Mies Van Der Rohe, Stanley Tigerman, and others. Using the city as my classroom provided enduring inspiration.

I noticed, however, the lack of admiration of both women and architects of color in the Chicago scene and worldwide. When my professors suggested architects to use as inspiration, they were rarely African American, and never African American women. It was through my own investigations that I found images of architects similar to myself and my culture. Gradually, Paul Revere Williams became my Mies. Norma Merrick Sklarek became my F.L. Wright. Dina Griffith became my Renzo. Sharon Sutton could eloquently express my angst—preparing me for the suppression of the African American voice and visibility in the profession.

In my current position as Project Designer at Robert P. Madison International, I am surrounded by a rich history of architectural contributions from an African American owned firm, currently led by Sandra Madison. I make special attempts to show my face to those who are considering pursuing a design career, and try to persuade those with interest.

Currently, the United States has under 400 licensed African American women architects, making up just under .4% of the greater architect population. We have a desperate need for more representation. The diversity rates nationally in architecture are not keeping up with the changing communities that the profession is called upon to serve. African Americans comprise 13.9% of Ohio’s population. Strikingly, Ohio has 2,650 licensed architects, but only 63 are African American—that’s only 2% of the profession. This disparity has been evident since the inception of the profession. In 2015, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) initiated a deeper conversation about this matter. The AIA surveyed its members and supporters about the perception of diversity and also examined the relationship of diversity to success in the field. Its closing analysis suggested changes in hopes of creating greater equality and more balanced numbers. Communities and demographics are steadily changing, yet, the demographics of the designers of these same spaces are not keeping pace.

As the new president of the National Organization of Minority Architects Student Chapter (NOMAS) at Kent State University, Michelle Barrett is working towards creating and sustaining a space of support for students of color in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED). We recently discussed her ambitions to move past potential and into action in the architecture world’s quickly approaching future. Though the Kent State diversity numbers in the architecture and design programs seem to align with the national averages, the opportunity for a NOMAS chapter to spark a change is hopeful. The current minority students, and specifically Michelle, seem to recognize the importance of support for students of color at Kent State and are working towards change.

Michelle and I had the following conversation about her experience leading the NOMAS Chapter and her plans for the future.

Design Awards Michele and MichelleLeft to Right: Terrance Pitts (Turner Construction), Michelle Barrett, Michele Crawford, Teresa Giralt (Turner Construction), Amir Allenbey at the AIA Cleveland Design Awards

 

Michelle Barrett
Hometown: Gaithersburg, MD
Class / Year: Class of 2017, 4th year
Major: Architecture

 

MC: How did you hear about Kent State?

MB: As many black youth, I thought my future was in sports. I played soccer all of my life up until I tore my ACL during my senior year. Kent State was on my list of schools (for soccer) because my coach had past connections. After it was clear that I wouldn’t be playing sports in college, I had to approach that list of schools differently. Which one would provide the best academic value? Kent State was the answer.

 

MC: What inspired you to pursue the architecture path?

MB: I have always been drawn to art and design. Probably because of my mother; she is a graphic designer. But I never really wanted to be an artist. I wanted to have an impact on people’s everyday lives, to help people. I didn’t know how or what career would allow me to do that. At an away soccer tournament in Miami, a player’s mother took us on a tour of Downtown Miami. She gave us a history lesson on all the Art Deco inspired architecture and the type of events that happened there. I fell in love. At that point I realized how I could be creative, yet impactful, in society.

 

MC: Why NOMAS? Why now? 

MB: I did not previously know about NOMA/NOMAS until CAED Associate Dean Bill Willoughby initiated discussions on the topic. He was and continues to be an integral part of NOMAS here at Kent. After the initial informational presentations he gave students, a group of us students took the lead in formalizing the organization. The other students involved included: Torri Appling, Shelton Finch, and Zai Abdi. I personally took ownership of the process because I thought it was important to have an organization devoted to minority issues (diversity, inclusion, fellowship, etc) in relation to architecture. It’s a unique niche that cannot be fully realized in groups such as Black United Students (BUS).

 

MC: Have you ever felt as if you were treated unfairly because of your gender or race?

MB: On many occasions, people are surprised to hear about my academic achievements—be it my choice of major or my honors standing. After many years, their surprise no longer catches me off guard. However, I still feel an injustice when said individuals expect you to be 10x better than your peers. They hold you to different standards and it is unfair.

 

MC: What has been you favorite studio project?

MB: My favorite studio project was in Third Year Studio—The Media Center Library—a part of the Cleveland International School masterplan. It was the first time we interacted with real clients—the community, the students.

 

MC: As president what are the main goals that you have for the organization?

MB: My main goals for the organization include career development (educational and professional), community engagement in the Greater Cleveland area, and to ensure that the NOMAS voice continues to be heard as a legacy organization in the future CAED community.

 

***

Historically, the voice of the African American architect has been suppressed. However, as our world continues to change, the profession seems to be committed to making the field a more inclusive and welcoming place for all. Organizations like Design Diversity are working to push accountability in this matter. Design Diversity, an advisory committee which grew out of Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC), is committed to educating, connecting, and celebrating diversity in the design professions. Specifically focusing on African American and Latino communities, this group has specific goals of awareness to the larger design community with hopes of encouraging authentic, diverse views and considerations within and throughout the design process. Ultimately, Design Diversity and NOMA/NOMAS are promoting the importance of varied voices in educational and professional design communities.

 

Michele Crawford, Assoc. AIA, is a Project Designer at Robert P. Madison International, based in Cleveland, Ohio. Michele serves on a number of service organizations, including the Design Diversity Advisory Committee. In 2016, Michele was recognized with the Activism Award by AIA Cleveland. Follow Michele on Twitter @initiat_ed.

 

 

References:

NCARB By the Numbers 2015
http://www.ncarb.org/About-NCARB/NCARB-by-the-Numbers/~/media/Files/PDF/Special-Paper/2015NCARBbytheNumbers.ashx

African American Architects Directory
http://blackarch.uc.edu/

Diversity in the Profession of Architecture
http://www.aia.org/aiaucmp/groups/aia/documents/pdf/aiab108092.pdf

African Americans in Ohio
https://development.ohio.gov/files/research/P7003.pdf

 

11-22-16

CUDC students win AIA Design Awards!

AIA awards

This past Friday, the Cleveland chapters of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and International Interior Design Association (IIDA) hosted the 2016 Design Awards. The annual event honors work by local professionals as well as students. This year, CUDC students Caitlyn Scoville and Ziyan Ye received awards for their work in the 2016 summer studio; Home Economics: A State of Housing in Cleveland. Scoville was awarded the Honor Award—the highest award possible for her project “Lead Exposed,” while Ye received an Honorable Mention for his project “The Distributed Center.”

Caitlyn Scoville project Lead ExposedClick image to view full project. 

Scoville’s winning project examined housing demolition and redevelopment through a decision-making framework in relation to levels of lead contamination and environmental hazards in Cleveland’s neighborhoods. Her scheme addresses areas of lead concentration within the postindustrial landscape using a series of scales (regional, city, community, and individual) in order to alter the fabric over time. Scoville says of her work in the summer studio, “The studio allowed us to explore different scales of interventions, from the intimate to the city at large, and I think my passion for designing across these multiple scales was articulated in my final project”.

Ziyan Ye project The Distributed CenterClick image to view full project. 

Ye’s project examined new housing options near the proposed expansion of the Nord Family Greenway near University Circle and the Hough neighborhood to better integrate world class institutions and existing neighborhood needs. A variety of housing types and public spaces meet demands for high quality and affordable housing options across the economic spectrum. The proposed expanded greenway contextually weaves together multiple contexts, allowing for the development of multiple neighborhood anchors that tie in to a larger network.

11-08-16

ULI Team Formation Session & Brunch

2017 poster event 2-13-12

Graduate students at the CUDC, Cleveland State University, and Case Western Reserve University are gearing up for another year of the Urban Land Institute’s Urban Design Competition. Students will compete in January for the chance to win $50,000 in this international design and real estate finance competition. In recent years, collaborations between the Cleveland area schools have resulted in four honorable mentions.

Teams of 5 students gather at the CUDC to put together viable urban schemes for North American cities. Questions of transportation, infrastructure, healthy cities, and connectivity are all designed in the two-week competition. Local advisors and ULI representatives from real estate development, banking, architecture, and landscape architecture support the students as they develop hypothetical solutions for real world cities. Throughout November, students will form teams and will prepare for the competition through the winter break. Sunday, Nov. 13 we will sponsor a recruitment brunch at the CUDC. The deadline for registration is Dec. 5th. More information on the competition can be found here.

Team Formation Session and Brunch
Sunday, November 13, 2016
12 PM
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

RSVP at 216-357-3434 or cudc@kent.edu

11-01-16

MUD Research Symposium | Nov 04

Please consider joining eleven Master of Urban Design students and Associate Dean, Bill Willoughby, this Friday, November 4, 11:00AM-1:00PM at the CUDC for a student-led conference we’re calling, Divergent Humanisms for Urban Space.

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2016 MUD Research Symposium participating students:

Samantha Ayotte, “AGRI-SOURCING: A Menu of Options for Food Production in the City”
Elizabeth Ellis, “The Memory of the City: An Argument for Place in an Impending Placeless World”
Morgan Gundlach, “The Secret Life of Autonomous Vehicles”
Megan Mitchell, “A Concern for Happiness in Urban Design”
Casey Poe, “Wanted: Cities for People”
Alexander Scott, “City: The Urban Canvas”
Caitlyn Scoville, “Toxicity”
Elizabeth Weiss, “The City is a Game”
Spencer White, “Be Ye a Foolish Virgin or a Wild One? Designing the City for a Wild 21st Century”
Connor Wollenzier, “A Retroactive Manifesto for Rem Koolhaas”
Ziyan Ye, “Vertical Urbanism”

Friday, November 4, 2016
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

This event is free and open to the public.

10-06-16

CAED Hiring Public Relations & Media Specialist

CAED_PR_job

The College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) at Kent State University is seeking applicants for a full‐time Public Relations and Media Specialist. Responsible for the creation, publication and dissemination of promotional materials, event planning and implementation, web and new media account curating. The position will oversee media communication efforts related to programming, content dissemination, student recruitment, advancement, and alumni relations.

This is a full-time position, located on the main campus in Kent, Ohio. For more information please view the complete job description here.

Submit all required materials as an on‐line application to KSU Human Resources. To complete the process, go to: https://jobs.kent.edu/postings/10885 (Position #989358)

07-25-16

CAED seeks Assistant Professor for MLA Program

CAED_PR_job

The College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) at Kent State University invites applications for full‐time, non‐tenure track, Assistant Professor appointment in landscape architecture. The CAED’s graduate programs in Landscape Architecture (MLA I and MLA II) are situated in Cleveland, Ohio as part of the Cleveland Studio at Playhouse Square. The Cleveland Studio houses the practice and outreach offices of the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborate and serves as an alternative location for students enrolled in the Master of Architecture program seeking a degree with an emphasis in urban design.

We seek an excellent designer to teach graduate design studios and another area of emphasis: either the history/theory of landscape architecture, or the integration of construction technologies and site engineering. We seek applicants with strong representational skills (both hand and digital) who can teach those skills to their students. Cleveland and the regional context of Lake Erie offer unique opportunities and face many challenges requiring a landscape perspective. The MLA programs focus on urban, postindustrial, and infrastructural landscapes that merge cultural considerations with ecological systems and hydrological infrastructure. An MLA degree, or an accredited degree in landscape architecture in combination with an advanced graduate degree in a related field is required. Prior teaching experience and/or professional licensure are desired. The nine‐month appointment is to begin August 21,2016 and  has the potential to be renewed in subsequent years depending upon program needs.

Required Application Materials:

  1. Letter of interest with a narrative describing qualifications for the position, including a brief summary of teaching experience, practice experience, research, and other accomplishments.
  2. Curriculum Vitae.
  3. Contact information for three references to include name, email, phone number and your professional relationship to each reference.
  4. Digital portfolio of examples of teaching, practice, design work, and research that could include: images of design work, practice‐based work, evidence of representational skills (hand and digital), course syllabi, student work completed under your direction, and any research or evidence of design research. Portfolio should be no more than 10MB and submitted as a .pdf file.

For a complete description of these positions and to apply online, visit our jobsite at https://jobs.kent.edu/postings/9230
Equal Opportunity / Affirmative Action Employer / Disabled / Veterans

06-07-16

MLA Open House | June 25

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Please join us at our Master of Landscape Architecture Open House event to learn more about the program.

For over 60 years, the College of Architecture and Environmental Design has graduated qualified professionals who are leaders in their fields. Kent State University offers a full complement of environmental design professions.

The landscape architecture profession is projected to grow by 5% nationally over the next decade. Be part of a graduate program intent on re-imagining Northeast Ohio’s landscape for the benefit of future generations. Join the vanguard of design professionals working to create a more sustainable world.

Kent State University Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland OH 44115
Saturday, June 25th, 2016
10:00 am – Noon

The program includes a presentation by faculty, a student panel and tour of CUDC facilities.

For graduate program details please visit http://www.kent.edu/caed/master-landscape-architecture or contact our Graduate Programs office in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at 330.672.3765 for additional information and how to apply.

05-26-16

CHANGING VIEWS | Designing Youngstown’s Future

changingviews

The John J McDonough Museum of Art, Youngstown State University’s Center for Contemporary Art, will become a hub for exploring exciting possibilities for imagining public space in the city with you. Please join us at the Museum on June 10th for the opening reception from 6-8 PM. The exhibition will be on view through July 22nd.

CHANGING VIEWS | Designing Youngstown’s Future is a collaboration of regional universities with the citizens of Youngstown. Working with you, we are endeavoring to spark revitalization by demonstrating the potential for reuse and redesign in the area. The resulting projects will allow residents and businesses to see a future that otherwise might not be imagined. Youngstown State University’s Regional Economic Development Initiative (REDI) teamed up with students and faculty from Kent State University’s (KSU) College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) and KSU’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC). The exhibition highlights planning and design work that has taken place over the past year between economic development professionals at YSU and City of Youngstown residents along with the design expertise of KSU’s CAED and CUDC students.

CHANGING VIEWS | Designing Youngstown’s Future
June 10 – July 22, public reception, June 10, 6-8pm

John J McDonough Museum of Art
525 Wick Avenue
Youngstown, OH 44502

Hours
Tuesday – Saturday: 11 AM – 4 PM

The exhibition will also feature guest lectures from the CUDC staff.

Wednesday, June 29 | Economic Action Group Meeting | 10 – Noon
CUDC Guest Lecture 10 – 11am
Community Conversation: Ideas and Opportunities from the 2015 Youngstown Community Design Charrette
Kristen Zeiber, Urban Design and Project Manager, Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative

Thursday, July 7 | CUDC Guest Lecture 5:30 – 6:30pm
Historic Preservation and Urban Regeneration
Terry Schwarz, Director, Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative

Tuesday, July 19 | Economic Action Group Meeting | 10 – Noon
CUDC Guest Lecture 10 – 11am
Urban Design for Cold and Variable Climates
David Jurca, Associate Director, Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative

All lectures will take place in the McDonough Museum of Art Auditorium.

 

02-22-16

Doug Steidl Lecture | February 26

Doug1

This Friday, February 26th at noon, we welcome Doug Steidl, Dean of the Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design. Doug’s talk, “International Travel and Lessons Learned”, will emphasize that learning about and understanding cultural subtleties, and some not so subtle, will facilitate both practical aspects for relationship building and a broader understanding of global perspectives.Doug3

Mr. Steidl was a practicing architect for 35 years. He was a founding partner of Braun & Steidl Architects in Akron, Ohio, a position he held from 1983 to 2007. Before joining Kent State, he served as manager of Renard, LLC, an investment, development and consulting company. His career also includes working at John David Jones & Associates as designer, project manager and director of architecture; the U.S. Navy Civil Engineering Corps; Allegheny County Redevelopment Authority in Pittsburgh, PA; and the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company. Over the course of his career, he was elected National President of the American Institute of Architects, and served as President of the National Architectural Accrediting Board. Mr. Steidl is a Registered Architect with the State of Ohio (23 jurisdictions previously).

The lecture will be held at the CUDC from 12-1 PM. As always, free and open to the public.

 

07-02-15

Volunteer at our design/REbuild house!

design_rebuild_volunteer_2

Can new design and construction ideas breathe life back into some of  Cleveland’s houses?

We believe that design brings value, and may help others re-envision the possibilities for Cleveland’s undervalued housing stock. Every year Cleveland loses thousands of houses to demolition.

In 2014 a 3rd year Kent State University architecture studio led by Chris Maurer examined design possibilities for radically renovating an existing vacant brick house, 1045 E 67th St. Over the summer, CAED/CAEST students worked on-site every afternoon to realize their collective design vision.

In 2015, we’re returning to the house to finish construction with the aim of selling it in the fall and using the funds to renovate another house in 2016. And we’re looking for volunteers to join us!

Five Saturdays in 2015 – July 11; July 25; August 08; August 22; and September 05 – we’ll be on-site working 8:00AM-4:00PM at the house. If you’re interested in volunteering please reach out to Kristen Zeiber via email: kzeiber[at]kent.edu – we’ll put you on our list and email out the to-do tasks the week ahead of every Saturday. Earn Community Outreach IDP hours, bring tools for the day if you have them, and come as you can, whenever you can.

Thanks in advance for all your help! For more information on the design/REbuild house visit here.

02-09-15

CUDC Fall Studio Teams Compete in MidTown Design Competition

nykamp and gates image_cropAerial rendering of a development proposal for Cleveland’s MidTown District created by CUDC graduate students Matthew Nykamp and Heather Flick. The concept, named “Deeply Rooted,” proposed a public green space network overlaid on broadband data infrastructure.  

First year graduate students at the CUDC kicked-off their urban design studio experience this fall with a local design competition. Focused on a segment of Cleveland’s Health-Tech Corridor, the competition involved several local partners and offered a $1,000 cash prize provided by Geis Companies.

Stretching along three miles of Cleveland’s Euclid Avenue, the Health-Tech Corridor (HTC) served as the geographic scope for the studio. The HTC is a 1,600 acre swath of near east side neighborhoods, including healthcare institutions, business incubators, academic centers, and over 123 high-tech companies, all anchored by a bus rapid transit (BRT) line.

AU14 Studio Syllabus-3

The competition’s primary focus sites lie within the broader Health-Tech Corridor, clustered between E. 55th Street and E. 70th Street in the MidTown neighborhood. Students were given a tour of the area by knowledgeable community partners, including: Jeff Epstein, Director of the Health-Tech Corridor; Maura Maresh, Development Director at Geis Companies; and Will Warren, Finance Analyst at the City of Cleveland’s Department Economic Development.

Five student teams competed in the studio’s design competition. Each project employed a unique perspective on the opportunities presented by the site. Although all teams produced strong proposals for the jury to consider, ultimately Team RED was selected as the prize winner.

Students will present their work again at an event organized by Heath-Tech Corridor at JumpStart on February 26, 2014. If you’re interested in learning more about the upcoming event or the student projects, please contact studio instructor David Jurca.

Final slide presentations from all teams are shown below:

 

From Grey to Green | Clarisse Gates, James Lennon

Graduate students Clarisse Gates and James Lennon envision a holistic development strategy focused on improving the health of MidTown employees and surrounding residents. From Grey to Green identifies measurable goals for green infrastructure, providing attractive and functional amenities to spur new development.

 

MidtownLink | Said Abiakl

Exploring the site’s potential to connect adjacent neighborhoods, MidtownLink weaves a multi-use trail through variously scaled public spaces. Said Abiakl conducted a rigorous analysis of climatic conditions, storm water strategies, and programmatic arrangements to arrive at an iconic circular form to anchor the mixed-use development.

 

Mi[xe]d Town | Tyler Middendorf

Through research on the district’s historic development patterns, Tyler Middendorf derived the insight that past developments were too focused on a single industry. Comprised of businesses primarily based on the automotive industry, the district fell victim to volatile global market forces, resulting in the vacancy we see today. In an effort to prevent similar collapses in the future, Mi[xe]d Town diversifies entertainment, mobility, and employment opportunities, creating a resilient community.

 

MidTown Beat | Brittany Ballish, Andrew Foster

Building on existing assets within MidTown, Brittany and Andrew aim to grow the various rhythms of activity in the neighborhood. A proposed music therapy facility leverages the area’s music identity, punctuated by the nearby Cleveland Agora. Public spaces create areas of respite while integrating multiple levels of entertainment. Transit-oriented design elements reconnect Midtown with Downtown Cleveland, universities, and healthcare campuses. Streetscape enhancements and public arcades respond to the need for north-south connections to enable future growth and neighbor relations.

 

Deeply Rooted | Heather Flick, Matthew Nykamp

“The Deeper the Network, The Greater the Community” is the tagline for Matthew Nykamp and Heather Flick’s proposal, which aims to grow rich digital and physical social spaces. Leveraging the area’s broadband fiber infrastructure, Deeply Rooted attracts both new technology businesses and current neighborhood residents to interact in a dynamic public realm.

 

RED | Turki Alosimi, Mykie Hrusovski, Katelyn Milius
* Competition Winning Project

RED‘s goal is to create a technology-focused environment that promotes healthy living, celebrates diversity, fosters collaboration, and provides opportunities for growth on site. The project team addressed this goal by creating a flexible design strategy, rather than rigid master plan, which empowers nearby residents to climb up the ladder of success.

Team RED also created a stop-motion animation, which portrays an engaging story of two people working in the neighborhood.

10-17-14

We need your help!

The St. Clair Superior Development Corporation (SCSDC) has been chosen to compete in the Enterprise Nurture an Idea Award challenge for the Design [re] Build project, and you can help us win! The organization that raises the most money will win $10,000 towards their project, thanks to Ohio Savings Bank. crowdrise_2 Design [re] Build is a concept offering architecture students real life design and construction experience while saving a blighted property. Design [re] Build is in collaboration with SCSDC, Kent State University and the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative. 2013-2014 was our pilot year for this project. We want to make this pilot project a full-fledged program in years to come. Our goal is to raise $35,000 to help to support the efforts of Design [re] Build. crowdrise_1 The challenge began on Monday, October 13th and runs until 11:59 PM on November 7th. Only donations during this time will be counted towards the challenge. SCSDC will be able to keep all donations received on Crowdrise, regardless of if we win or not. Here is how you can help:

  1. Go to our fundraising page and make a donation: https://www.crowdrise.com/designrebuild/fundraiser/stclairsuperiordevel Every donation, large or small, supports our organization’s work AND brings us closer to winning the challenge.
  2. Fundraise with us! Set up your own online donation page by joining our team. Visit the link above and click “Fundraise for this Campaign” on the right. Follow the simple instructions to creating your own page. Then, share the link with all your friends, family and colleagues to ask them to donate to your page. Feel free to forward this message along, as well!

Thank you so much for your help and support. We couldn’t do it without you! designbuildstudio1

09-02-14

CAED Groundbreaking | October 3-4, 2014

caed

The weekend of October 3-4, 2014  Kent State University Alumni are invited to return to campus to see the changes and what the future holds for College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED). The college will be hosting a number of events to celebrate the groundbreaking for the new building; this is an ideal time to visit your alma mater!

The CAED wants this to be a great experience for you; a time to reconnect, participate in the building project and meet alumni from other years. More than 10 classes have committed to reunions and many alumni are planning to return to campus. Their hope is to have more than 150 alumni come back to campus and celebrate together.

Click to RSVP or learn more.

If you have any questions please contact Wiley Runnestrand (wrunnest[at]kent.edu) or Marti Ring (mkring1[at]kent.edu); especially if you are interested in planning a reunion for your class.

 

06-20-14

Master of Landscape Architecture Open House at the CUDC

Rotator_MLA3-01

The landscape architecture profession is projected to grow by 14% nationally over the next decade. Be part of a graduate program intent on reimagining Northeast Ohio’s landscape for the benefit of future generations.

We invite you to consider our new Master of Landscape Architecture program, housed at Kent State University’s CUDC facility in Cleveland’s Playhouse Square District. We are pleased to offer one of only two professionally-oriented Landscape Architecture program in Ohio and the only one of its kind located in Northeast Ohio.

Please join us at our Master of Landscape Architecture Open House event to learn more about the program and enjoy a networking lunch with local professionals, student peers, and faculty.

Saturday, June 28, 2014 from 11:00 AM to 2:00 PM. Kent State University’s CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200, Cleveland, OH 44115.

Please reserve your place for this event before June 25, 2014. CLICK HERE TO REGISTER NOW or call 330-672-3765.

MLA_open house

 

04-30-14

Design/REbuild Studio | Final Review

designbuildreview

Join us Friday May 2nd, from 1-5 PM at the former Goodrich Gannet Neighborhood Center in the St. Clair Superior District of Cleveland for the final presentation and review of the Kent State University CAED Third Year Design/REbuild Studio.

The mission of the studio was to re-imagine uses for Cleveland’s blighted housing stock. The emphasis was on making a proposal which allows the greatest possible community impact with this one small project, either as an example for others to follow or an initiative that could be scaled later for greater impact. The students were encouraged to advocate with community leaders to make their big-impact projects happen. Many of them did find potential partners, but none committed fully to the project.

After mid semester review the studio shifted gears to creating a market rate home with a social-impact theme for our client the St. Clair Superior Development Corporation who plans to sell the project on the open market.

The design they intend to present to you for review, architecturally, socially, and practically – we are building the project this summer with the generous support of VIP Restoration and Durham Brothers Construction. We have a roster of +/-20 students working along side professionals and volunteers that will build the design.

The work of the students should be judged on:

• design concept and execution
• conformance with the original vision of community impact-oriented design
• practicality of construction – leveraging of unskilled labor (labor opportunity planning)
• quality of presentation and presentation material
• replicability – how our efforts can inspire others in the community to renovate

Everyone should have ample time to discuss their ideas on the project, and we hope after the academic review of the work a dialog will be created between the students, jurors, community members and project partners. We are going to site within a month, but the design is by no means fixed. Your feedback will have a direct impact on the project’s implementation.

Goodrich Gannett Neighborhood Center
1368 East 55th St., Cleveland, OH 44103
May 2, 2014
1-5 PM