09-22-17

Publication Release: NEW LIFE FOR OLD HOMES

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We’re happy to announce the publication of New Life for Old Homes: Design Guide for the Low-Cost Rehab of Vacant & Affordable Housing!

New Life for Old Homes is a user-friendly guidebook of low-cost, high-impact ideas for the rehabilitation of vacant and abandoned houses that would otherwise be demolished. The project was conceived in tandem with our Design/REbuild initiative, a vacant brick home in the St Clair-Superior neighborhood that was rehabbed by students from KSU’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design (and lots of community volunteers). While Design/REbuild could only address one house at a time, New Life for Old Homes captures the larger design ideas around refreshing Cleveland’s vacant houses to make them vibrant again.

Cleveland’s historic neighborhood fabric is threatened by the 1,000+ demolitions that take place every year. These houses form the basis of our traditional city neighborhoods and, while they may not have dramatic architectural or historic significance, they contribute to the familiar scale and character of Ohio’s cities. The goal of New Life for Old Homes is to repair, rather than demolish, and to rediscover the unique appeal that older houses have to offer. We hope the guide inspires Clevelanders to look again at our sturdy homes that are too good to throw away.

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New Life for Old Homes was generously sponsored by the Ohio History Fund, which supports innovative historic preservation projects across the state. We’re deeply grateful for the support of the OHF in creating this publication.

Please feel free to browse the publication below, and if you’d like to purchase a print-on-demand copy for yourself, you can find our Amazon link here. We also have copies of the printed book available for free at CUDC. If you’d like to pick up a copy, just stop by the CUDC office between 9am – 5pm and ask for the New Life for Old Homes book.

 

09-20-17

Ben Herring Lecture | September 22

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Lecture: “Source Material: Identities in Architecture”
Ben Herring
Friday, September 22nd
12(noon) – 1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

RSVP on the Facebook event page.

Join us at the CUDC this Friday, September 22nd for a talk by Ben Herring, project manager at redhouse studio architecture. His interactive presentation will explore meaning through materiality in architecture. The applications of architectures are no longer simple, nor simply for providing shelter. The uses of architecture include identities as concrete as defining the face of business (Facebook Headquarters, Gehry Partners), as personal as defining home (Incremental Housing Complex Quinta Monroy, Elemental), and as controversial as redefining our memory (Vietnam Memorial, Maya Lin). These projects are young. However, architecture is prehistoric. In turn, many well established views on the state of the art of architecture have been declared and deconstructed throughout architectural history.

The aim of this presentation will be to review an abbreviated collection of these influences on architectural history. This survey of trademark architectural definitions, agendas, and identities will then be used to provide a groundwork for discourse on how we approach architecture today.

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Clifford Benjamin Herring is a designer specializing in new materials and architectures for public good. Ben was administered various honors at Ball State University where he received degrees in Architecture and Economics. He has previously served as a board member for PBS and NPR member stations in Southern Indiana and is currently seated as the executive board treasurer for the Refresh Collective (the organization responsible for the Fresh Camp). Ben is a project manager at redhouse studio architecture where his work includes new material developments and various non-for-profit and commercial architectures. As a workshop director for the CUDC’s Making Our Own Space (MOOS) program, Ben works with youth throughout Cleveland, Ohio to influence their neighborhoods through design and construction.

Let us know you’re coming. RSVP on the Facebook event page and please spread the word!

View the CUDC’s full 2017 Fall Lecture Series.

 

12-08-16

Advocating for Diversity: A Conversation with Michelle Barrett of NOMAS

michele crawford cropMichele Crawford presents her architectural research at the 2014 Design Diversity Powered by PechaKucha event in Cleveland, Ohio

Michele Crawford from Architecture firm Robert P. Madison International speaks with Michelle Barrett, the new president of the National Organization of Minority Architects Student Chapter (NOMAS) at Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design

by Michele Crawford

My inspiration to become an architect emerged from my educational journey. I did not have many architectural influences prior to my start on the path to architecture. My career goal was to become a car designer. I translated this ambition to the creation of interior environments and ultimately completed both a Bachelor of Science degree in Interior Architecture and Master of Architecture from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. The study of architecture in Chicago proved to be an amazing experience. My studio space was on the top floor of The Sullivan Center, formerly the Carson Pirie Scott Building, and I could easily visit historical examples of designs from Frank Lloyd Wright, Renzo Piano, Mies Van Der Rohe, Stanley Tigerman, and others. Using the city as my classroom provided enduring inspiration.

I noticed, however, the lack of admiration of both women and architects of color in the Chicago scene and worldwide. When my professors suggested architects to use as inspiration, they were rarely African American, and never African American women. It was through my own investigations that I found images of architects similar to myself and my culture. Gradually, Paul Revere Williams became my Mies. Norma Merrick Sklarek became my F.L. Wright. Dina Griffith became my Renzo. Sharon Sutton could eloquently express my angst—preparing me for the suppression of the African American voice and visibility in the profession.

In my current position as Project Designer at Robert P. Madison International, I am surrounded by a rich history of architectural contributions from an African American owned firm, currently led by Sandra Madison. I make special attempts to show my face to those who are considering pursuing a design career, and try to persuade those with interest.

Currently, the United States has under 400 licensed African American women architects, making up just under .4% of the greater architect population. We have a desperate need for more representation. The diversity rates nationally in architecture are not keeping up with the changing communities that the profession is called upon to serve. African Americans comprise 13.9% of Ohio’s population. Strikingly, Ohio has 2,650 licensed architects, but only 63 are African American—that’s only 2% of the profession. This disparity has been evident since the inception of the profession. In 2015, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) initiated a deeper conversation about this matter. The AIA surveyed its members and supporters about the perception of diversity and also examined the relationship of diversity to success in the field. Its closing analysis suggested changes in hopes of creating greater equality and more balanced numbers. Communities and demographics are steadily changing, yet, the demographics of the designers of these same spaces are not keeping pace.

As the new president of the National Organization of Minority Architects Student Chapter (NOMAS) at Kent State University, Michelle Barrett is working towards creating and sustaining a space of support for students of color in the College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED). We recently discussed her ambitions to move past potential and into action in the architecture world’s quickly approaching future. Though the Kent State diversity numbers in the architecture and design programs seem to align with the national averages, the opportunity for a NOMAS chapter to spark a change is hopeful. The current minority students, and specifically Michelle, seem to recognize the importance of support for students of color at Kent State and are working towards change.

Michelle and I had the following conversation about her experience leading the NOMAS Chapter and her plans for the future.

Design Awards Michele and MichelleLeft to Right: Terrance Pitts (Turner Construction), Michelle Barrett, Michele Crawford, Teresa Giralt (Turner Construction), Amir Allenbey at the AIA Cleveland Design Awards

 

Michelle Barrett
Hometown: Gaithersburg, MD
Class / Year: Class of 2017, 4th year
Major: Architecture

 

MC: How did you hear about Kent State?

MB: As many black youth, I thought my future was in sports. I played soccer all of my life up until I tore my ACL during my senior year. Kent State was on my list of schools (for soccer) because my coach had past connections. After it was clear that I wouldn’t be playing sports in college, I had to approach that list of schools differently. Which one would provide the best academic value? Kent State was the answer.

 

MC: What inspired you to pursue the architecture path?

MB: I have always been drawn to art and design. Probably because of my mother; she is a graphic designer. But I never really wanted to be an artist. I wanted to have an impact on people’s everyday lives, to help people. I didn’t know how or what career would allow me to do that. At an away soccer tournament in Miami, a player’s mother took us on a tour of Downtown Miami. She gave us a history lesson on all the Art Deco inspired architecture and the type of events that happened there. I fell in love. At that point I realized how I could be creative, yet impactful, in society.

 

MC: Why NOMAS? Why now? 

MB: I did not previously know about NOMA/NOMAS until CAED Associate Dean Bill Willoughby initiated discussions on the topic. He was and continues to be an integral part of NOMAS here at Kent. After the initial informational presentations he gave students, a group of us students took the lead in formalizing the organization. The other students involved included: Torri Appling, Shelton Finch, and Zai Abdi. I personally took ownership of the process because I thought it was important to have an organization devoted to minority issues (diversity, inclusion, fellowship, etc) in relation to architecture. It’s a unique niche that cannot be fully realized in groups such as Black United Students (BUS).

 

MC: Have you ever felt as if you were treated unfairly because of your gender or race?

MB: On many occasions, people are surprised to hear about my academic achievements—be it my choice of major or my honors standing. After many years, their surprise no longer catches me off guard. However, I still feel an injustice when said individuals expect you to be 10x better than your peers. They hold you to different standards and it is unfair.

 

MC: What has been you favorite studio project?

MB: My favorite studio project was in Third Year Studio—The Media Center Library—a part of the Cleveland International School masterplan. It was the first time we interacted with real clients—the community, the students.

 

MC: As president what are the main goals that you have for the organization?

MB: My main goals for the organization include career development (educational and professional), community engagement in the Greater Cleveland area, and to ensure that the NOMAS voice continues to be heard as a legacy organization in the future CAED community.

 

***

Historically, the voice of the African American architect has been suppressed. However, as our world continues to change, the profession seems to be committed to making the field a more inclusive and welcoming place for all. Organizations like Design Diversity are working to push accountability in this matter. Design Diversity, an advisory committee which grew out of Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC), is committed to educating, connecting, and celebrating diversity in the design professions. Specifically focusing on African American and Latino communities, this group has specific goals of awareness to the larger design community with hopes of encouraging authentic, diverse views and considerations within and throughout the design process. Ultimately, Design Diversity and NOMA/NOMAS are promoting the importance of varied voices in educational and professional design communities.

 

Michele Crawford, Assoc. AIA, is a Project Designer at Robert P. Madison International, based in Cleveland, Ohio. Michele serves on a number of service organizations, including the Design Diversity Advisory Committee. In 2016, Michele was recognized with the Activism Award by AIA Cleveland. Follow Michele on Twitter @initiat_ed.

 

 

References:

NCARB By the Numbers 2015
http://www.ncarb.org/About-NCARB/NCARB-by-the-Numbers/~/media/Files/PDF/Special-Paper/2015NCARBbytheNumbers.ashx

African American Architects Directory
http://blackarch.uc.edu/

Diversity in the Profession of Architecture
http://www.aia.org/aiaucmp/groups/aia/documents/pdf/aiab108092.pdf

African Americans in Ohio
https://development.ohio.gov/files/research/P7003.pdf

 

09-13-16

INDEX Studio: Cleveland x Havana Report

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The INDEX studio examined the relationships between two cities–Cleveland, Ohio and Havana, Cuba. The 15-week studio took place in the spring of 2016 at Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC). By comparing these very different urban contexts, the studio provided new insights into familiar places and a better understanding of the challenges facing global cities.

Read and download the full report, written in English and Spanish, below.

Twelve graduate students generated proposals for a waterfront site in each of the two cities. The Cleveland site is the now-defunct Lakeshore Coal Plant, a monumental structure on a 60 acre site along the city’s eastern lakefront. The Havana counterpart is the Nico-Lopez Oil Refinery, a 500 acre facility still functioning as a refinery on the southeastern banks of Havana Bay.

Ash Pond ParkGraduate students Alexander Scott and Jordan Fitzgerald re-envisioned the Lakeshore Coal Plant as a regional destination for industrial arts preservation and production, located in close proximity to Cleveland’s University Circle arts and culture district.

Proposed Havana Bay Waterfront DevelopmentGraduate student Morgan Gundlach examined the opportunities to incorporate the 5′ (1.50 m) sea-level rise expected by 2100 by creating a dynamic ribbon of green spaces along Havana Bay’s waterfront.  

Students met with a range of design professionals and local experts while in Havana. These insights and direct observations gathered during the five day travel formed the basis of urban design proposals shown in the report. At the conclusion of the studio, students received feedback on their proposals from Cuban architects Ernesto Jimenez and Sofia Marquez Aguiar during the architects’ visit to Cleveland. The students’ design work will be exhibited in Havana, at the Fabrica de Arte Cubano, in Spring 2017.

The INDEX Studio is part of the curriculum for the Master of Architecture and Master of Urban Design programs in Kent State’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED). Kent State is committed to global education and expanding the cultural literacy of our students. Cuba offers a remarkably complex and locally relevant range of design opportunities. This initial studio is a first step toward establishing relationships with colleagues and collaborators in Cuba.

View and download the full report below:

Support for the travelling studio was generously provided by The Cleveland Foundation.

09-22-15

Miguel Coyula Lecture | October 7th

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Miguel Coyula is an architect, urban planner, and professor at the University of Havana. He will give a comprehensive overview of Havana from its origins to the present, ending with an open question shared by many people these day: What kind of city will Havana be in the coming years?

The event will be held at:

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
Kent State University
Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, Ohio 44115
Directions to the CUDC

Following Professor Coyula’s talk, there will be a light dinner catered by Earth Bistro Café featuring contemporary American cuisine with a Cuban flair. This event is free and made possible by KSU President Emeritus Lester Lefton, but REGISTRATION is required.

For any inquiries regarding the event, please contact the CUDC.

 

05-21-15

Urban Agriculture in Cuba: film + talk

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Please join us for a brown bag lunch talk with Cuban agronomist Isis Salcines along with a screening of the film, Tierralismo

This free event will take place at the CUDC (1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200) on May 27 from noon-1pm. Please bring your lunch–we’ll provide drinks and snacks.

About the film…

TIERRALISMO A film by Alejandro Ramirez Anderson

On the outskirts of Havana, sandwiched between highways and public housing, a revolution is taking place. Here, in the district of Alamar, a 26-acre farming co-op provides employment for dozens of workers, while producing vegetables and medicinal plants for the local community and beyond.

Following the collapse of the Soviet Bloc in the early 1990s, Cuba was no longer able to access machinery and agricultural chemicals from its former Communist allies. In this difficult environment, the government relaxed economic rules and allowed the formation of cooperatives like the Organopónico Vivero Alamar.

What began as necessity—farming without pesticides and chemical fertilizers—has become a source of pride to coop members. They fertilize with compost and cow manure, raise their own insects for biological pest control, and have even created a fully biodegradable alternative to the plastic bag for use with seedlings.

Tierralismo introduces us to everyone from agronomists and senior management to workers who plant, plow, and propagate. The film also covers non-farming aspects of the operation, such as human resources and accounting practices where transparency is paramount.

Lovingly photographed, TIERRALISMO offers a behind-the-scenes portrait of the Organopónico Vivero Alamar and a stirring defense of the importance of farm work and sustainable farming practices.

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About the speaker…

Following the film, Isis Salcines, Projects Coordinator in the Projects and Investments Office at the Organoponico, will give a presentation about her work. Ms. Salcines holds an advanced studies degree in Agricultural Engineering and has been with Organoponico since 1998. During her time at the cooperative, she has launched a new food preservation project and has focused on the marketing and distribution of local organic produce to domestic and international markets.

For more information about the event, please contact the CUDC here.

04-20-15

Spring Lecture Series | Terry Schwarz

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CUDC LUNCH TALK

Terry Schwarz

Friday, April 24th 12-1pm

CUDC Conference Room, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200

Event is free and all are welcome!

Click here to RSVP.

Cuba–hasta siempre

Havana, Cuba is one of the most beautiful cities in the world, despite decades of disinvestment in its historic architecture and civic infrastructure. As diplomatic relations begin to improve between the US and Cuba and the long-standing trade embargo is lifted, foreign investment will pour into Havana. The rapid influx of new money and ideas may help to stabilize Havana, but will also inevitably disrupt and transform the city in unpredictable ways.

Last month, Doug Steidl, Dean of the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State, and Terry Schwarz, Director of KSU’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, traveled to Cuba at the invitation of Hiram College and the Joaquín Weiss Institute. At Friday’s lunch talk, Terry will discuss some emerging opportunities for design and urban regeneration in Havana.

To RSVP, please click here. (RSVPs encouraged, but not required.)

For more information, please contact us at cudc@kent.edu or (216) 357-3434.

04-07-15

Spring Lecture Series | Jack Bialosky Jr.

Jack Bialosky

CUDC LUNCH TALK

Jack Bialosky Jr | Senior Principal and Managing Partner, Bialosky + Partners Architects
Friday, April 10th
12-1pm
CUDC Conference Room, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Event is free and all are welcome!

Staying Out of the Niche: How to keep your firm fresh and relevant in an ever-changing world

The talk will explore the diversity and evolution of the work and culture of Bialosky + Partners Architects. A talk in three parts; first Jack will take a brief walk through the progression of major projects in the firm’s 60 year history. Each design represents a milestone in the firm’s history and contains key advancements and knowledge that builds and informs the next work. This also provides a window into the progressing culture of the firm. Second, Jack will discuss how to build a great firm culture and what talents, skills, and qualities the firm looks for in its staff. The talk will conclude with a quick presentation of current work and a picture of where the firm is headed over the next 10 years.

Learning objectives include the following:

1. Why diversity of project types and scale are more fun
2. Winning new project types through collaboration
3. Applying design knowledge across various project types
4. How to build a great firm culture
5. What it takes to secure and advance in a position at a great firm


BIO:

Jack A. Bialosky, Jr., AIA, LEED AP, leads one of the Midwest’s most successful and collaborative architecture firms, Bialosky + Partners Architects.

Jack A. Bialosky, Jr., the son of a prominent Cleveland architect, assumed leadership of a firm widely known for its modern residential and religious projects. After working at Kallman McKinnell & Wood Architects in Boston, Jack returned to Cleveland to initiate 20+ years of stewardship and transformation of his father’s small local firm, Bialosky + Partners Architects. The firm is known for the quality of its designs, the trust of their clients, the longevity of its staff, and the diversity of its portfolio.

In addition to design awards, the firm garnered the 2013 Northcoast 99 Award that recognizes the highest ranked workplaces in Northeast Ohio across all sectors.  In 2009, the firm was recognized by the American Institute of Architects as an AIA Ohio Gold Medal Firm, the highest honor awarded by its peers, in recognition of great depth and breadth, a collaborative environment, and having a cumulative effect on the profession over a substantial period of time. Jack’s initiative to seek out other collaborative designers and artists has resulted in ongoing partnerships with designers such as Maya Lin, David Moss, and Architecture Research Office.

For more information, please contact the CUDC at cudc@kent.edu or call (216) 357-3434.

03-30-15

We’re Hiring! Part-Time, Admin Position

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Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) is hiring a part-time Business Manager position for our downtown Cleveland office. The job responsibilities include administrative and clerical assistance for the CUDC’s professional practice and academic programs.

POSITION DESCRIPTION:

Administrative Clerk | Part-time position, Monday- Friday 8:30 am – 12:30 pm

FOR A FULL JOB DESCRIPTION AND TO APPLY ONLINE:

  1. Visit Kent State’s Career Postings Sitehttps://jobs.kent.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/frameset/Frameset.jsp?time=1427740048253
  2. Enter Position Number: 998191
  3. Click “SEARCH”
  4. Click “View” under Administrative Clerk
  5. Click “APPLY FOR THIS POSTING”
  6. In addition to applying online through Kent State’s Career Posting Site; please email resume to Terry Schwarz at tschwarz@kent.edu

RESPONSIBILITIES INCLUDE:

  • Provides part-time administrative, budget, and clerical assistance to the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative unit in downtown Cleveland. This position is housed in the downtown Cleveland office.
  • Coordinates and monitors CUDC budget and expense accounts.
  • Coordinates workflow and schedule to ensure deadlines are met, priorities are recognized, and policies/procedures are followed.
  • Assists with occasional office functions to include set up and clean up.
  • Schedules university facilities for academic and nonacademic events (e.g., meetings, dinners, parties, etc.); reserves locations, dates and times; assists clients with the planning of events (e.g., the types of tables); completes necessary forms; enforces university and scheduling procedures.
  • Answers, screens, and routes incoming telephone calls from multiple lines, takes messages, may send messages through electronic mail, places and logs long distance calls.
  • Greets and screens students, faculty, professional staff, administrators, and visitors, directs to appropriate location or person; may distribute, explain, and/or collect forms, pamphlets, or other informational documents.
  • Provides general and specialized information to students, faculty, professional staff, administrators, visitors, or callers regarding policy and procedures of University or department, campus locations, University events, class times and cancellations, telephone numbers, etc.; refers questions requiring more knowledge or data to appropriate person.
  • Sorts and distributes incoming mail for department; prepares bulk mailings.
  • May type basic items such as memos, schedules, telephone listings, envelopes, labels, data cards and occasional letters or reports from draft using typewriter or word processor. May perform other clerical duties such as filing, producing photocopies, sending and receiving facsimiles, and arranging for repairs.
  • Maintains various logs (e.g., parcels, visitors, keys, etc.), calendar of events, and/or appointment book.
  • Must pass a security check.

ABOUT CUDC:

The Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) is a community design and research division of the College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) at Kent State University. Based in downtown Cleveland, the CUDC provides technical design assistance to communities throughout the northeast Ohio region, conducts research into urgent and emerging areas of design practice, and offers a variety of public education, and design advocacy programs.

 

02-26-14

Two CUDC Teams, in Partnership with CSU & CWRU, Receive ULI Honorable Mention

We are pleased to announce that two participating teams from the CUDC have been awarded an Honorable Mention from this year’s ULI Gerald D. Hines Urban Design Competition! A two week intensive urban design and finance competition for graduate students, the Urban Land Institute (ULI) received more than 160 entries from 72 universities across the US and Canada this year. This year’s site in Nashville, TN asked students to address large scale issues of flooding, workforce housing, and to create connections across neighborhoods. Five teams comprising of Kent State University, Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), and Cleveland State University (CSU) students joined forces at the CUDC in mid-January.

Team “Second Nature,” consisting of CUDC students Claire Markwardt and Neil Reindel, and CWRU students Dan Whalen, Abraham Weiner, and Tom Brown proposed the daylighting of an underground stream, a series of flood control measures, and development along the Cumberland River’s edge.

second-nature-internal-blockProposed Market and Mixed Use Development along the newly day lit French Lick Tributary.


second-nature-section-strategiesSection showing sustainable interventions and flood management strategies used throughout the site. Click to view full size.


Team “E.C.H.O System” comprised of CUDC students Jeff Jasinksi, Matt Dureiko, and Brian Pagnotta, as well as CWRU student John Ostroske and CSU student Michael Mears. Their scheme introduced a series of “spillways” and green spaces as neighborhood amenities between urban blocks, while enhancing the Cumberland River waterfront through a variety of green spaces and a large scale farmers’ market.

echo-system-farmers-marketStreet view showing people interacting with the landscape and each other along the main pedestrian corridor that links the site and baseball field with the hotel, market, and river.


echo-system-birds-eyeAerial view showing the linkages between the river, development, and the city, facilitated by the natural landscape and its orientation.


This is the second consecutive year CUDC students received an honorable mention—including a repeat performance from students Claire Markwardt, Neil Reindel, and Abraham Weiner.

01-22-14

CUDC Wins 2014 American Planning Association Award!

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The CUDC is pleased to announce that our project, Pop Up City: Temporary Interventions for Community Engagement, has won the 2014 National Planning Achievement Award for Public Outreach.

Established by the CUDC in 2007, Pop Up City is a program that brings empty places to life through magical, ephemeral experiences that demonstrate how vacancy can be an opportunity and an adventure, not just a liability. These are temporary events and installations that occupy vacant buildings and activate vacant land in ways that shine a spotlight on some of Cleveland’s spectacular but underutilized properties.

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Pop Up City offers a powerful way for people to envision future development alternatives and determine their preferences based on actual experiences. While traditional design professionals may find it easy to envision a transformed space on the basis of two-dimensional drawings, often the general public does not. Through high-impact, short-duration projects like Pop-Up Rockwell, non-design professionals get to “experience” the transformative potential of a space and come to understand and support a design that they might not otherwise have understood fully.

The CUDC is extremely proud of our achievement and is looking forward to more Pop Up City events in the future.

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08-27-13

Summer Graduate Studio Examines the E. 22nd Street Corridor

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The program for the 2013 summer graduate urban design studio, which took place at Kent State University’s CUDC, was commenced with the investigation of the E. 22nd street corridor. Cleveland State University and the Campus District, Inc. sponsored the project led by studio instructor Charles Graves.  The initial investigation ran for three weeks and culminated in a proposal for the E. 22nd street corridor by the students of the graduate class.

The concept diagram below drove the project.

concept-diagram

The goals of this study were as follows:

  • Link the city to the waterfronts
  • Thread amenities through new infrastructure
  • Revitalize natural resources to improve health & well being
  • Attract residents through new development & activity

Read more…

04-28-13

2013 Capstone Final Review Schedule

We’re excited to announce the final review schedule for the 2013 Master of Urban Design capstone projects (see below). Graduate students at the CUDC enrolled in the Master of Urban Design or dual degree (Master of Architecture + Master of Urban Design) programs at the CUDC conclude their coursework with an individualized capstone project. Each capstone project is developed over two semesters, with the first semester focused on framing a research question and the second devoted to creating a design response. As can be seen from the project names below, the investigations span a wide range of topics and geographies.

The capstone presentations for this year’s class will be held at the CUDC (1309 Euclid Avenue, 2nd Floor) and are open to the public. If you are interested in pursuing a Master of Urban Design degree or just curious about one of the capstone topics, please feel free to attend any of the presentations. You don’t need to RSVP, but we ask that attendees arrive shortly before the designated start time. The presentation and discussion immediately following each project should run about an hour and a half. More information on the academic programs offered at the CUDC can be found on our website here. Contact us at cudc@kent.edu with any questions and we look forward to seeing you soon!

2013 Capstone Final Review Schedule:

4/30

10:00am
Antonia Marinucci | Erieview, Cleveland: Economic + Physical Reimagining
(Advisors: Charles Harker, Steve Rugare, Ellen Sullivan)

5/3

10:00am
Thom Nester | Public Space and the Effects of Digital Culture
(Advisors: David Jurca, Greg Stroh, Steve Rugare)

5/6

10:30am
Matt Provolt | TopoCity: Sheraden Neighborhood, Pittsburgh
(Advisors: Ellen Sullivan, Charles Graves, Sagree Sharma)

1:00pm
Brandon Young | Revising Richard Florida: Creative/Productive Space for Cleveland
(Advisors: Diane Davis-Sikora, Jonathan Kurtz, Terry Schwarz)

5/7

9:00am
Sarah Myers | From Waste to Pop Up: a Temporary Diversion from the Landfill
(Advisors: Jonathan Fleming, Charles Frederick, Terry Schwarz)

10:30am
Gabriel Fey | New Futures for the Infrastructural City
(Advisors: Steve Rugare, Jonathan Fleming, Jonathan Kurtz, Jacqueline Mills)

1:00pm
Troy Eklum | Transit Based Metropolitan Master Planning: Developing a Large Scale Strategy for Growth and Mobility Patterning
(Advisors: Ellen Sullivan, Charles Frederick, Steve Rugare)

5/8

1:00pm
Arthur Schmidt | Beyond Complete Streets: a Methodology for Designing a Complete Urban Street System
(Advisors: Steve Rugare, Jeff Kruth, Stephanie Ryberg-Webster, Daniel Vieyra)

5/9

3:30pm
Tommy Chesnes | Neighborhood Tuning: Waterloo Arts District, Cleveland
(Advisors: Terry Schwarz, Wayne Mortensen, Ellen Sullivan)

Download PDF: 2013 Capstone Final Review Schedule

11-05-12

Just Released…Urban Infill Vol 5: Diagrammatically

* Order Diagrammatically from the CUDC Amazon storefront here.

The 2012 volume of Urban Infill is now available through Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, local book stores, and Amazon. UI5: Diagrammatically applies the techniques of diagramming to urban design practice through critical essays, case studies, and examples. Over twenty contributors from the US and Europe discuss the ways that urban diagrams engage the public, reveal hidden agendas, and navigate uncertainty. The book features innovative and thought-provoking examples of urban diagramming, presented in a lively, full-color format.

A few examples of the work included in the book:

Re-cultivating the Forest City‘ is a must-read for Clevelanders. A design proposal developed by PORT Architecture + Urbanism, this series of diagrams and renderings offers a seductive glimpse at Cleveland’s future where urban vacancy leads to economic productivity, ecological regeneration, and increased public use of the Cuyahoga Valley.

image: PORT Architecture + Urbanism

image: PORT Architecture + Urbanism

image: PORT Architecture + Urbanism

Thinking + Talking Adaptability,’ a series of diagrams created by the Adaptable Futures project at Loughborough University in the UK, provides a toolbox of diagrams that communicate sustainable values and highlight aspects of building performance. This work is useful to designers and lay audiences alike, and provides the basis for a shared understanding of the components of sustainable design.

image: Adaptable Futures

image: Adaptable Futures

image: Adaptable Futures

image: Adaptable Futures

Strategrams‘ by Susan Rogers at the Community Design Resource Center in Houston and ‘Empowerpoint‘ by Interface Studio in Philadelphia present diagramming strategies in the context of community design practice.

image: Ryan Sullivan, Paste in Place

image: Ryan Sullivan, Paste in Place

image: Susan Rogers

image: Susan Rogers

image: Leah Murphy, Interface Studio

image: Leah Murphy, Interface Studio

image: Leah Murphy, Interface Studio

image: Leah Murphy, Interface Studio

Through the Diagram…‘ by Kent State University faculty member Greg Stroh showcases recent work from the graduate studios at the College of Architecture and Environmental Design.

image: Justin Gantz, KSU Graduate Architecture Studio III

image: Justin Gantz, KSU Graduate Architecture Studio III

Diagrammatically will be of interest to architecture and planning students, urban design practitioners, and anyone interested in better, more livable cities.

Get your copy of Diagrammatically today: CUDC Amazon Store.

For more information about the Urban Infill journal series, please contact the CUDC at: cudc[AT]kent.edu

06-26-12

Postcard Underground Sends Their Love To Pop Up Rockwell

Over the past week, we’ve received at least eight handwritten postcards thanking us for Pop Up Rockwell. When we received the first one, written on an art gallery postcard, we figured it was from someone interested in promoting an upcoming art opening and just happened to hear about our project. After three cards arrived the next day, written in different hands, it was clear something else was going on.


Well, after a little googling, it appears we’re the (very grateful:) recipients of some handwritten love from Postcard Underground. There isn’t much information on this secretive group available – all we could find are blog posts from a few other postcard beneficiaries, like this one from Minnesota Public Radio. It seems a national network of note writers is coordinating efforts to shower individuals and groups with encouraging messages for doing good work. A pretty simple, yet lovely, idea.


Reading the postcards, it feels good to see that each note is different and the writers are actually familiar with the project. One note read, “Wow! ‘Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design.’ Win-win”, so we know he or she must have watched Rob (Homeland Security officer) enthusiastically mention this phrase on the Pop Up Rockwell video.

We feel very lucky to have experienced this “random (and simultaneously coordinated) act of kindness” and hope Postcard Underground continues to spread the love. But with so many deserving projects out there, it won’t be easy to avoid the hand-cramps.

♥, CUDC