10-04-17

Kristen Zeiber Lecture | October 6

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Lecture: “Scaling Up: Design with People and Places
Kristen Zeiber
Friday, October 6th
12(noon) — 1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

RSVPs encouraged on Facebook event page: https://www.facebook.com/events/573039656153285/

In her talk, Kristen will speak about navigating scales, from architecture to urban design to regional design, in her exploration of the connection between people and the places they live. Work presented ranges from small-scale design/build to watersheds, from the post-Katrina Gulf Coast to post-coal Pennsylvania. She argues that across all scales, designers should work for people, and with respect for their relationship to the landscapes where they have chosen to live—even if those places have environmental or economic risk.

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Kristen Zeiber is a Project Manager, Urban Designer, and Adjunct Faculty at Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC). She has been with the CUDC since 2013, and contributes to the organization’s neighborhood planning, research, mapping, and student advising. She also teaches the annual Midwest Urban Design Charrette for Masters students in Architecture and Urban Design in collaboration with several other universities. She is on the Board of Directors and co-chairs the Scholarship Committee for the Cleveland chapter of ACE Mentors, a nonprofit extracurricular program which introduces high school students to the Architecture, Construction, and Engineering professions.

Kristen’s previous Community Design Center and Design/Build experience includes over four years post-Katrina at Mississippi State University’s Gulf Coast Community Design Studio in Biloxi, MS, with founder David Perkes; and short internships with the Center for Urban Pedagogy in New York and the Yestermorrow Design/Build School in Vermont. She holds a MS in Architecture Studies (SMArchS-Urbanism) from MIT, and a Bachelor’s of Architecture from Penn State University.

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09-27-17

Greggor Mattson Lecture | September 29

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Lecture: “Who Needs Gay Bars? Why Planners Should Care And What You Can Do”
Greggor Mattson
Friday, September 22nd
12(noon) — 1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

RSVPs encouraged on Facebook event page: www.facebook.com/events/118361948853908/

The high profile closures of gay bars over the last five years have brought to public attention what the gay press has worried about for years: the geographical focus of LGBTQ life is changing. Popular and scholarly attention have blamed our “untethered,” “ambient,” “post-Gay” landscape on two factors: geolocating smartphone apps such as Grindr or Tindr, and the growing social acceptance of LGBTQ people. This talk challenges these assumptions for all but the most metropolitan gay cities. Almost everything we know about LGBTQ placemaking in the U.S. comes from four major cities with iconic gay neighborhoods, global financial institutions, international tourist draws—and only 15% of the U.S. population.

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This talk examines the gay bar as an institution in its own right, focusing on the role it plays in secondary cities such as Cleveland, Fresno, or Oklahoma City, and outpost bars that are the only gay bar within an hour’s drive of another. In these small cities, often in red counties of red states, smartphone apps are of little use and social acceptance is more elusive. Data include 50 interviews with gay bar owners and managers, site visits to over 80 gay bars in 27 states, a new national dataset of gay bar listings from 1977-2017, and a longitudinal study of San Francisco’s three gay bar districts. Mattson shows that bars in general have been squeezed in recent years, and that gentrification, changing leisure patterns, and corporate chain competition are more relevant to the challenges facing gay bars than narratives of technological or social progress. Mattson reports on several ways that urban planners, municipalities, Chambers of Commerce, and Convention Bureaus could support gay bars, and argue why they should start doing so. And he argues that we need to abandon planning stereotypes of LGBTQ people as the shock troops of gentrification or canaries of the knowledge economy, and start treating regional gay bars as social institutions in their own right.

Greggor Mattson is Associate Professor of Sociology at Oberlin College and the Director of the Program in Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies. With degrees in sociology from Oxford University and the University of California, Berkeley, his research lies at the intersections of the sociology of sexuality, culture, and urban studies. The author of The Cultural Politics of European Prostitution Reform: Governing Loose Women and Before It Was Hingetown, listed among the best writing from and about Northeast Ohio from 2016 by the Cleveland Scene. He is currently working on a book about changes in American gay bars over the last twenty years. He blogs at greggormattson.com and @GreggorMattson on Twitter.

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09-20-17

Ben Herring Lecture | September 22

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Lecture: “Source Material: Identities in Architecture”
Ben Herring
Friday, September 22nd
12(noon) – 1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

RSVP on the Facebook event page.

Join us at the CUDC this Friday, September 22nd for a talk by Ben Herring, project manager at redhouse studio architecture. His interactive presentation will explore meaning through materiality in architecture. The applications of architectures are no longer simple, nor simply for providing shelter. The uses of architecture include identities as concrete as defining the face of business (Facebook Headquarters, Gehry Partners), as personal as defining home (Incremental Housing Complex Quinta Monroy, Elemental), and as controversial as redefining our memory (Vietnam Memorial, Maya Lin). These projects are young. However, architecture is prehistoric. In turn, many well established views on the state of the art of architecture have been declared and deconstructed throughout architectural history.

The aim of this presentation will be to review an abbreviated collection of these influences on architectural history. This survey of trademark architectural definitions, agendas, and identities will then be used to provide a groundwork for discourse on how we approach architecture today.

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Clifford Benjamin Herring is a designer specializing in new materials and architectures for public good. Ben was administered various honors at Ball State University where he received degrees in Architecture and Economics. He has previously served as a board member for PBS and NPR member stations in Southern Indiana and is currently seated as the executive board treasurer for the Refresh Collective (the organization responsible for the Fresh Camp). Ben is a project manager at redhouse studio architecture where his work includes new material developments and various non-for-profit and commercial architectures. As a workshop director for the CUDC’s Making Our Own Space (MOOS) program, Ben works with youth throughout Cleveland, Ohio to influence their neighborhoods through design and construction.

Let us know you’re coming. RSVP on the Facebook event page and please spread the word!

View the CUDC’s full 2017 Fall Lecture Series.

 

09-11-17

Jacinda Walker Lecture | September 15

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Lecture: “Design Journeys: Strategies for Increasing Diversity in Design Disciplines”
Jacinda Walker
Friday, September 15th
12(noon)-1pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

Join us at the CUDC this Friday at lunch for a talk by Jacinda Walker, the second event in our 2017 Fall Lecture Series. Jacinda Walker will discuss the objectives of her research work, “Design Journeys: Strategies for Increasing Diversity in Design Disciplines.” This solutions-based thesis presents fifteen strategic ideas to expose African-American and Latino youth to design-related careers. The interactive talk will reveal her research approach, illustrate the problems, share the design principles needed to close the diversity gap, and include the first groundbreaking updates on the Design Diversity Index project. Attendees will leave with a clear definition of this complex problem and a deeper appreciation of what is required from educators, parents, organizations, and designers of all disciplines to diversify our profession.

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The Design Journey Map, created by Jacinda Walker, is a tool to guide progress towards increasing diversity in the design fields.

Jacinda Walker is the founder of designExplorr, an organization that celebrates design learning by creating opportunities that expose African American and Latino youth to design. She also serves as Chair of AIGA’s Diversity & Inclusion Task Force. Walker has over 20 years of industry experience as a designer, entrepreneur, and instructor. Jacinda earned her BFA in graphic design from the University of Akron and an MFA in Design Research & Development with a minor in Nonprofit Studies from The Ohio State University. Her future goals include working with organizations to establish design education initiatives and to develop design programs for underrepresented youth.

For more information about the upcoming talk, please contact the CUDC at (216) 357-3434 or cudc[at]kent.edu

 

09-22-15

Miguel Coyula Lecture | October 7th

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Miguel Coyula is an architect, urban planner, and professor at the University of Havana. He will give a comprehensive overview of Havana from its origins to the present, ending with an open question shared by many people these day: What kind of city will Havana be in the coming years?

The event will be held at:

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
Kent State University
Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, Ohio 44115
Directions to the CUDC

Following Professor Coyula’s talk, there will be a light dinner catered by Earth Bistro Café featuring contemporary American cuisine with a Cuban flair. This event is free and made possible by KSU President Emeritus Lester Lefton, but REGISTRATION is required.

For any inquiries regarding the event, please contact the CUDC.

 

09-01-15

AIA Cleveland Emerging Practitioner Lecture Series | John Cerone

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Join us for an evening with John Cerone, Director of Virtual Design & Construction at SHoP Architects. John has been instrumental in SHoP’s development of technology and process, specializing in Building Information Modeling (BIM).

Honing Digital Design and Delivery (1 CEU)

Learning Objectives
• Model-based project delivery
• Parametric design-to-fabrication workflow efficiencies
• CNC-driven fabrication & data management
• Collaboration via cloud-based platforms

John received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the School of Architecture at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio (2002), and his Master of Architecture degree from the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation at Columbia University (2008). He currently serves as an Adjunct Professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Planning and Preservation, teaching seminars in ‘Digital Representation’ and ‘Parametric Modeling’. He has taught at Parsons New School for Design in New York and actively lectures on the topic of Virtual Design & Construction.

This lecture is brought to you by AIA Cleveland as part of their Emerging Practitioner Lecture Series and is sponsored by 3form.

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04-21-15

Keith Hayes + Nikole Bouchard | In Version: The Mistaking of Placemaking

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Join AIA Cleveland and the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative for the next lecture in the Emerging Practitioners Series as we welcome visiting designers Keith Hayes and Nikole Bouchard. Based in Milwaukee, Keith and Nikole are currently working in Cleveland’s St. Clair Superior neighborhood on the matireal landshape project. Focused on creating an up-cycled public plaza, the project will reuse discarded tires to construct topography and engage residents to build community.

In Version: The Mistaking of Placemaking
A first hand perspective on the amalgam of forces at work (Keith) and the role of architecture in the field of public interest design (Nikole).

Friday, April 24, 2015
5:30pm
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115
Lecture is free and open to the public.
Visit the Facebook event page here.

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As a designer and social entrepreneur, Keith Hayes is informed by interfacing with resources, landscape, and language.

ln 2010, he launched beintween, a social and spatial organization improv(is)ing leftover spaces, based in Milwaukee, WI. Noteworthy accomplishments include a successfully funded Kickstarter for matireal, an 8 acre linear corridor known as the artery, a guerilla installation known as the swing park, and the organization of a design/build coopetition. He is now actively pursuing partnerships to develop a takerspace, the reclamation of a double lot + vacant home in Milwaukee, in addition to a plaza proposal in Cleveland. Hayes informs his practice through the application of relationships, resources, and research through a process he refers to as sp/acement, whereby arts and cultural development become a retainer of community rather than a token to displace it.

Education:
University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, MArch
University of Miami, BArch

Nikole Bouchard’s research focuses on how the intersection between architecture, landscape, and infrastructure can stimulate ecologically sensitive and culturally relevant design interventions.

Nikole has previously taught at Syracuse University, Cornell University, The University of Waterloo and The University of Toronto. While teaching in Canada, Nikole collaborated with Toronto-based InfraNet Lab/Lateral Office on various design competitions and exhibitions. During this time, a number of award-winning projects were produced, including the 2011 Holcim Gold project Regional Food-Gathering Nodes and Logistics Network in Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada. Prior to joining InfraNet Lab/Lateral Office, Nikole worked at the offices of Steven Holl Architects and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP in New York City.

Education:
Princeton University, MArch
Cornell University, BArch

For more information, contact the CUDC at cudc(at)kent.edu or call (216) 357-3438.

04-20-15

Spring Lecture Series | Terry Schwarz

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CUDC LUNCH TALK

Terry Schwarz

Friday, April 24th 12-1pm

CUDC Conference Room, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200

Event is free and all are welcome!

Click here to RSVP.

Cuba–hasta siempre

Havana, Cuba is one of the most beautiful cities in the world, despite decades of disinvestment in its historic architecture and civic infrastructure. As diplomatic relations begin to improve between the US and Cuba and the long-standing trade embargo is lifted, foreign investment will pour into Havana. The rapid influx of new money and ideas may help to stabilize Havana, but will also inevitably disrupt and transform the city in unpredictable ways.

Last month, Doug Steidl, Dean of the College of Architecture and Environmental Design at Kent State, and Terry Schwarz, Director of KSU’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, traveled to Cuba at the invitation of Hiram College and the Joaquín Weiss Institute. At Friday’s lunch talk, Terry will discuss some emerging opportunities for design and urban regeneration in Havana.

To RSVP, please click here. (RSVPs encouraged, but not required.)

For more information, please contact us at cudc@kent.edu or (216) 357-3434.

04-07-15

Spring Lecture Series | Jack Bialosky Jr.

Jack Bialosky

CUDC LUNCH TALK

Jack Bialosky Jr | Senior Principal and Managing Partner, Bialosky + Partners Architects
Friday, April 10th
12-1pm
CUDC Conference Room, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Event is free and all are welcome!

Staying Out of the Niche: How to keep your firm fresh and relevant in an ever-changing world

The talk will explore the diversity and evolution of the work and culture of Bialosky + Partners Architects. A talk in three parts; first Jack will take a brief walk through the progression of major projects in the firm’s 60 year history. Each design represents a milestone in the firm’s history and contains key advancements and knowledge that builds and informs the next work. This also provides a window into the progressing culture of the firm. Second, Jack will discuss how to build a great firm culture and what talents, skills, and qualities the firm looks for in its staff. The talk will conclude with a quick presentation of current work and a picture of where the firm is headed over the next 10 years.

Learning objectives include the following:

1. Why diversity of project types and scale are more fun
2. Winning new project types through collaboration
3. Applying design knowledge across various project types
4. How to build a great firm culture
5. What it takes to secure and advance in a position at a great firm


BIO:

Jack A. Bialosky, Jr., AIA, LEED AP, leads one of the Midwest’s most successful and collaborative architecture firms, Bialosky + Partners Architects.

Jack A. Bialosky, Jr., the son of a prominent Cleveland architect, assumed leadership of a firm widely known for its modern residential and religious projects. After working at Kallman McKinnell & Wood Architects in Boston, Jack returned to Cleveland to initiate 20+ years of stewardship and transformation of his father’s small local firm, Bialosky + Partners Architects. The firm is known for the quality of its designs, the trust of their clients, the longevity of its staff, and the diversity of its portfolio.

In addition to design awards, the firm garnered the 2013 Northcoast 99 Award that recognizes the highest ranked workplaces in Northeast Ohio across all sectors.  In 2009, the firm was recognized by the American Institute of Architects as an AIA Ohio Gold Medal Firm, the highest honor awarded by its peers, in recognition of great depth and breadth, a collaborative environment, and having a cumulative effect on the profession over a substantial period of time. Jack’s initiative to seek out other collaborative designers and artists has resulted in ongoing partnerships with designers such as Maya Lin, David Moss, and Architecture Research Office.

For more information, please contact the CUDC at cudc@kent.edu or call (216) 357-3434.

05-13-13

LECTURE: Marika Shioiri-Clark on Dignifying Design

Marika Shioiri-Clark, principal of SOSHL Studio, will speak at the CUDC on “Dignifying Design” as part of AIA Cleveland‘s 2013 Emerging Practitioner Lecture Series. Based in Cleveland, SOSHL Studio is dedicated to creating social impact through architecture and design. In response to Denise Scott Brown’s comments on her exclusion from the Pritzker Prize, Marika recently co-authored a CNN.com article on the continuing discrimination of women in architecture.

Marika Shioiri-Clark | Dignifying Design
Friday, May 31, 2013
5:30pm
Kent State CUDC
1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
RSVP on the Facebook event page here

From 2007 to 2010, Marika was Co-Founder and Managing Director of MASS Design Group, an architectural nonprofit designing well-built environments that aid in the reduction of global poverty. Marika was a lead designer on the Butaro Hospital project in northern Rwanda in collaboration with Partners in Health, the Clinton HIV/AIDS Initiative, and the Rwandan Ministry of Health, and lived on-site in 2008 developing the designs and overseeing construction.


Marika has received several awards for her work in reframing architects as global change agents. She was an invited Ideas Scholar at the Aspen Institute in 2009, and received a US National Commission for UNESCO Traveling Fellowship in 2008. Marika received her BA in Urban Studies from Brown University, and her Masters of Architecture from the Harvard Graduate School of Design, where her graduate thesis under advisors Jacques Herzog and Pierre DeMeuron focused on gendered public spaces in Cairo, Egypt. In 2011 she served in the first class of global residents at IDEO.org.

Watch Marika’s TEDxStellenbosch talk on Empathic Architecture:

The Emerging Practitioner Lecture Series is organized by AIA Cleveland‘s Associates Committee in partnership with Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative. Events are free and open to the public.

Questions can be directed to: angela.jayjack@gmail.com

03-11-12

Full Video + Slides from Susannah Drake’s dlandstudio Lecture

Proposal for southern tip of Manhattan by dlandstudio for MoMA Rising Currents exhibition

Thanks to everyone that attended Susannah Drake’s presentation at the CUDC. If you were in the audience, then we’re sure you found her dlandstudio projects to be as creative and inspiring as we did. Fortunately, for those unable to attend the presentation, we have the full video available online. The 1 hour 18 minute presentation is divided into 3 parts, including introductory remarks from CUDC Director Terry Schwarz and updates on the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District‘s green infrastructure plans from Kyle Dreyfuss-Wells, followed by Susannah Drake’s detailed presentation of several public projects ranging from city-wide infrastructure plans to temporary pop-up parks. Enjoy!

02-26-12

Susannah Drake Lecture 3/2/12

Susannah Drake Lecture
Friday, March 2, 2012
8:30 AM – 10:30 AM
CUDC Conference Room
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland – PlayhouseSquare

Susannah Drake is founder and Principal of dlandstudio llc, an award winning multidisciplinary design firm. She will discuss dlandstudio’s recent public projects including the Gowanus Canal Sponge Park, a public open space system designed to absorb and remediate urban storm water, and the Brooklyn Bridge Pop-up Park, a temporary waterfront open space that attracted almost 200,000 visitors over six weeks of operation in 2008.

This event is free, but reservations are required. RSVP for the event on our Facebook page here, by email at cudc@kent.edu or give us a call at (216) 357-3434.

Continuing Education credits are available for landscape architects.

Sponsored by The George Gund Foundation, the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District, and the Kent State College of Architecture and Environmental Design.

11-17-11

Lecture: ‘Big Box Reuse’ Author Julia Christensen


Bring your lunch and join us at the CUDC Friday, November 18th from noon – 1 pm for a conversation with Julia Christensen, author of Big Box Reuse, published by MIT Press in 2008.

Julia Christensen is an artist who works in video, photography, networked media, writing, sound arts, sculpture, installation, and performance. Her work has exhibited at galleries and museums internationally, including the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Carnegie Museum of Fine Arts in Pittsburgh, Spaces Gallery in Cleveland, and The Lincoln Center in NYC. Recent solo exhibitions include: Your Town Inc., (which originated at the Miller Gallery at Carnegie Mellon University and was curated by Astria Suparak), and Surplus Rising (which originated at the Banvard Gallery, Knowlton School of Architecture at Ohio State University).

Julia is the author of Big Box Reuse, published by the MIT Press in 2008. This book is a product of her ongoing investigation into how communities are renovating and reusing abandoned big box buildings in the United States. Her project “Surplus Rising” will be published as a part of the 3rd Coast Atlas, forthcoming. Christensen’s writing has been published in magazines such as Orion, Print, and Slate. Her work has been featured in publications such as The New York Times, The Washington Post, Bookforum, The New York Review of Books, Bomb, Afterall, and Dwell Magazine.

Ms. Christensen is currently the Henry Luce Visiting Professor of Emerging Arts at Oberlin College and Conservatory, where she produces the Margin Release New Media Lecture Series. Christensen has a joint appointment between the departments of Studio Art, TIMARA (Technology in Music and Related Arts), and Environmental Studies. Before coming to Oberlin, she taught at Stanford University, Pratt Institute, California College of the Arts, and other colleges. She has been an invited speaker and critic at dozens of colleges and universities, including the San Francisco Art Institute, Cornell University, Yale University, and New York University.

In the fall of 2011, Christensen will take on the position of Assistant Professor of Integrated Media in the Studio Arts Department at Oberlin.

10-03-11

Rumi Shammin Presents The Oberlin Project


Rumi Shammin, PhD, Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies at Oberlin College, will discuss The Oberlin Project, a planned green redesign of the Oberlin community at the CUDC on Friday, October 7th from 12pm – 1pm. The Oberlin Project is a collaborative effort between the college and the City of Oberlin to create “full-spectrum sustainability” in which the parts are integrated to reinforce the resilience and durability of the whole community.

Rumi Shammin Lecture
Friday, October 7, 2011
12pm – 1pm
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
(map)
Cleveland (Playhouse Square)
Free and open to the public

The vision of the project joins the many strands of sustainability – urban revitalization, green development, advanced energy technology, sustainable agriculture, green jobs, and education – into an integrated response to the burgeoning crisis of climate destabilization, environmental deterioration, and economic turmoil.

At the heart of the Oberlin Project is the revitalization of a 13-acre block near the city center that will include the development or renovation of a dozen buildings during the next five to seven years. The investment in construction, renovation, and energy technology is intended to stimulate the expansion of existing businesses and create new enterprises.

The Oberlin Project will also join the Climate Positive Development Program, a joint initiative of the Clinton Climate Initiative, a program of the William J. Clinton Foundation, and the U.S. Green Building Council. Launched in May 2009 by President Clinton, the Climate Positive Development Program supports the development of large-scale urban projects that demonstrate that cities can grow in ways that are climate positive—able to reduce the amount of on-site CO2 emissions to below zero.

09-22-11

Jorge Otero-Pailos Workshop

Join us at the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative for a workshop on “Preservation and Creativity” with Jorge Otero-Pailos this coming Wednesday (9/28) at 8:30am. Preservation is often seen as lacking architectural design creativity, or worse, as standing in the way of it. This workshop will explore the ideas about creativity that undergird this prejudice, and invite participants to consider new ways in which creativity might be rethought to formulate a more productive engagement between architecture and preservation.

The workshop will last a little over an hour, and a light breakfast will be served. Please RSVP to srugare@kent.edu so that we have a count and so that we can send you some brief texts that will be discussed.

Jorge Otero-Pailos Workshop
Wednesday, September 28, 2011
8:30-10:00 am
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200

Jorge Otero-Pailos (Madrid, 1971) is a New York based architect, artist and theorist specialized in experimental forms of preservation. He is tenured Associate Professor of Historic Preservation at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture. He is the Founder and Editor of the journal Future Anterior. His artworks have been exhibited in international shows such as the Venice Art Biennial, and are in the collections of major museums and foundations. His works and writings have been published in international publications such as Art in America, Artforum, Architectural Record, Volume, and others. His work rethinks preservation as a powerful countercultural practice that creates alternative futures for our world heritage.