10-30-17

Urban Land Institute’s Gerald Hines Real Estate Competition | Info Session

jeffblog2017 Competition Entry. 

Lecture: “Urban Land Institute’s Gerald Hines Real Estate Competition”
Jeff Kruth
Friday, November 3rd
12:00 PM — 1:00 PM & 5:30 PM
CUDC, 1309 Euclid Avenue, Suite 200
Free and open to the public

This Friday, November 3rd an introduction the Urban Land Institute’s annual Urban Design Competition will take place. The competition asks graduate students from design, planning, and business backgrounds to collaboratively work towards a vibrant and financially viable urban design scheme in cities across North America. In past years, KSU CUDC students have worked with CSU’s Levin students, and CWRU’s Weatherhead students to compete for a $50,000 prize.

A lunch lecture at 12:00pm will give an overview of the competition with coordinator, Jeff Kruth and  former student competitors. At 5:30pm, an information session with free beer and pizza will ask interested students to think about forming teams. The competition takes place January 15-29.

render 32015 Competition Entry (click to view larger). 

09-08-17

Watermark Project Summer Finale

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The CUDC, with partners Neighborhood Progress, artist Mimi Kato, and archaeologist Dr. Roy Larik, recently held their summer finale of events surrounding the Watermark project. The project seeks to evoke the memory of the Giddings Brook, a waterway buried and culverted in the early 20th century. Dee Jay Doc and Fresh Camp provided hip-hop entertainment, improvising lyrics about the history of the Giddings Brook, problems concerning lead in their neighborhoods, and other stories. Food, a rain barrel give-away, and an installation of the Watermark beach and pool also brought people out to the site.

 

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Giddings Brook is one of several waterways buried as the city developed in the early 20th century. The Brook holds history as a recreation, entertainment, and restorative place of gathering. Luna Park, a theme park, a Fresh Air Camp, and multiple healthcare facilities were located along the path of Giddings Brook before its ultimate burial. Watermark seeks to ask how else we might consider the use of existing waterways today, as well as those now buried in so many neighborhoods throughout the city.

 

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Watermark is made possible through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts.

04-25-17

The Student Perspective : CUBA

This year’s Spring Studio, The International Design Exchange (INDEX) Studio is a graduate design studio established to build an understanding of global urban issues.The studio explores strategies for urban regeneration revealed through a comparative analysis of Cleveland, Ohio and Havana, Cuba. The studio functions as a timely conduit for the exchange of ideas between the two cities. As part of the studio, four graduate students traveled to Cuba, during spring break, to strengthen the research and relationships established with architects and architecture students and the University of Havana. Two of the students, Reuben Shaw II and Randy Hoover, shared their experience and work with us. Here is their perspective:

Reuben Shaw II, Master of Landscape Architecture

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Cuba was never on my list of countries to visit. Stories about the taboos of the society and the government subconsciously blocked this island nation from my view. I’ve visited a few of the Caribbean Islands but still, Cuba was invisible. During my stay in Havana, I realized that Cuba was one of the most unique and beautiful places I have ever been, not only aesthetically, but culturally and socially. The proverb, “Better to see something once than hear about it a thousand times” became a reality.

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Fanguito neighborhood in Havana, Cuba

While working on the Havana studio project in Cleveland, it was a challenge to really grasp our site with aerials; as landscape architecture students, most of our taught site-analysis techniques were void. Flying to Cuba and walking the streets of the Fanguito neighborhood really gave us a perspective that added to our repertoire. We discovered a sense of place that was generated by the people and an empirical expression of culture that you could only get by asking questions and adopting the lifestyle of the residents.

This opportunity to travel to Cuba was truly inspiring and has fueled my desire to travel and experience other cultures. I believe when you travel you learn as much about yourself as you do about the place. Knowledge of self not only enriches your being but that of the people around you.

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Proposed wetland preserve and aquatic bird habitat along the Almendares River in Havana, Cuba

Randy Hoover, Master of Architecture

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Five days is a short time in which one can be expected to engage with the unique cultural and economic values in a city like Havana, but I believe this trip was successful in that regard. Stepping out onto Cuban soil was not, as some of my friends back home predicted, like stepping back in time to a land where technology and science ceased to progress. Once you look past the aesthetic value of colorful old cars on the road you begin to see Cuba’s development over the last decades as an alternate timeline, similar to our own, where resources are more scarce but vitality and variety of life are never sacrificed.

(Now don’t get me wrong, riding from one side of Havana to the other in a candy-coated Pontiac is something that should be experienced by every visitor to the island.)

Our studio design/research project for the semester focused on an intervention near the Almendares River in El Vedado district of Havana. This land is known as the less affluent part of town and in every way but its social structure can be considered a slum. In order to operate from thousands of miles away with little on-site experience, our group focused on projective interventions that could be built by accretion and overlay of infrastructural services. By developing a simple self-built housing prototype that connected its infrastructure to a central square, we could game out the look of our neighborhood intervention in abstraction without bulldozing over the existing social and economic complexities of the neighborhood.

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Cuadriculita 008: The central concrete pad provides infrastructural connections for surrounding residents.

The realistic conditions of a site are, of course, more complex than what can be assumed from a satellite image or journal article. When we walked through the neighborhood of El Fanguito we were greeted by complete strangers with smiles and welcome conversation with our inquiring minds. Narrow alleyways and informal sidewalks contributed to a set of streetscapes that functioned almost identically to the winding paths we suggested in the Cuadriculita proposal, except of course that it was constructed with more care, personality, and efficiency. Once we walked out of the neighborhood and up the hill to a grand vista that overlooked all of the informal housing, my perspective of the project completely shifted.

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A small cluster of housing built against the peculiar topography separating El Fanguito from El Vedado.

I expected this moment, of course, but maybe not in such an instantaneous fashion. The infrastructural connections were not perfect in every way but formed its own artistry out of the imperfections. Overlap of aesthetics and use-value with the homes were most apparent with bright blue water storage barrels and pigeon cages on some of the rooftops feeding PVC piping down into the invisible pathways and living spaces below. Our project’s assertion that an interior courtyard or open space was required in order to have a vibrant and connected lifestyle for each resident was dissolved after seeing this.

This INDEX studio travel opportunity is something that I will remember for the rest of my life. I was able to meet Cuban architectural contemporaries, sample the passionate lifestyle of residents, and bond with my trip-mates in sharing this experience of infinite value. I’d like to thank David Jurca, the CUDC, and Kent State University for this amazing opportunity.

The INDEX: CLExHAV Studio is part of the 2017 Creative Fusion program supported by The Cleveland Foundation. During the 2017 Spring Semester, the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC) will continue a partnership launched by Kent State University last year with Havana-based architects Sofía Márquez Aguiar and Ernesto Jiménez of Fábrica De Arte Cubano (Cuban Art Factory), a vibrant community arts space housed in a repurposed cooking oil plant in Havana. The architects will work with the KSU Urban Design and Landscape Architecture graduate studio and a Cleveland Institute of Art Interior Architecture studio on design proposals for two neighborhood projects: one in Havana’s Vedado neighborhood, where Fábrica De Arte Cubano is located, and another in Cleveland’s Glenville neighborhood. In early April, Márquez Aguiar and Jiménez arrived in Cleveland to review the students’ design proposals for Vedado and will remain in Cleveland for one month as they work with students to generate and fabricate the project to be built in Glenville. A public Pop Up Event is scheduled at the Glenville site (1470 E. 105th, Cleveland) on Friday, May 5th from 6-9pm. All are welcome. Learn more and RSVP on the Facebook event page here: https://www.facebook.com/events/532579883796334/ 

03-23-17

Mapping the Design Journey

by Jacinda Walker
Founder, designExplorr.com 

Design Journeys: Strategies for Increasing Diversity in Design Disciplines from Jacinda Walker on Vimeo.

The journey to a career can be met with great success or great struggle. When a traveler is prepared for the journey, they typically cover more distance and the experiences they encounter become quick stops along the way— moments of pause that, with rest and refueling, allow them to begin again. However, for a traveler who is less prepared to face the bumps, twists, and turns of the road, minor challenges become major roadblocks. Those minor challenges become permanent barricades that ultimately inhibit travel and one’s likelihood to continue on the path of success. Unfortunately, the latter path described here is all too common among young African American and Latino youth who seek a design-related career.

This line of inquiry led me to visualize what the journey to becoming a designer looks like and analyze what tools are needed to obtain a design-related career. My research work entitled, Design Journeys: Strategies for Increasing Diversity in Design Disciplines (2016) explores diversity in design disciplines and presents fifteen strategic ideas to expose African American and Latino youth to design-related careers. This solutions-based thesis introduces a map charting a design career from grade school to a seasoned professional. The “Design Journey Map” contains four color-coded passages: foundations, proficiency, workforce, and influence. The passages overlap with career competency components to cultivate soft skills together with the hard skills youth learn along the journey to a design career.

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Figure 1: The Design Journey Map in full

The Design Journey Map is a simple navigational tool that can be used as a framework to better inform students, parents, professionals and organizations which strategic ideas are needed and where to place them along the career path to increase diversity in design disciplines.

This framework is important because it shows the journey to become a designer and provides four principles of a strategic solution for closing the diversity gap in the design industry. The principles address the complex problem of a lack of diversity in design by identifying characteristics of a strategic solution needed for helping to close the diversity gap in design. They are labeled as comprehensive, collaborative, local, and scholastic. These Design Principles help to ensure long-term success for programs and initiatives whose intent is to expose African American and Latino youth to design-related careers.

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Figure 2: The four Design Principles for a strategic solution

Read more…

03-21-17

Samantha Ayotte | April 07

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On April 7, 2017, we welcome Samantha Ayotte to our Spring Lecture Series. Her talk, “My Birthright”, will present findings from her cultural exploration through Israel for her Birthright trip. There will be a discussion about how cultural, political, and religious experiences can differ and how they can provide solutions for contemporary living.

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Samantha Ayotte is a second-year dual degree (M.Arch, M.UD) candidate from Cleveland, Ohio. She holds an undergraduate degree in Architecture from Kent State University. She enjoys the opportunity to design and understand urban design challenges and solutions for cities like Cleveland through contemporary means of investigation. She believes communities and shared experiences can positively impact urban design, and her work thus far has aimed to implement those elements.

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Please join us from 12 PM - 1PMFriday, April 7th. This event is free and open to the public.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

11-08-16

ULI Team Formation Session & Brunch

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Graduate students at the CUDC, Cleveland State University, and Case Western Reserve University are gearing up for another year of the Urban Land Institute’s Urban Design Competition. Students will compete in January for the chance to win $50,000 in this international design and real estate finance competition. In recent years, collaborations between the Cleveland area schools have resulted in four honorable mentions.

Teams of 5 students gather at the CUDC to put together viable urban schemes for North American cities. Questions of transportation, infrastructure, healthy cities, and connectivity are all designed in the two-week competition. Local advisors and ULI representatives from real estate development, banking, architecture, and landscape architecture support the students as they develop hypothetical solutions for real world cities. Throughout November, students will form teams and will prepare for the competition through the winter break. Sunday, Nov. 13 we will sponsor a recruitment brunch at the CUDC. The deadline for registration is Dec. 5th. More information on the competition can be found here.

Team Formation Session and Brunch
Sunday, November 13, 2016
12 PM
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

RSVP at 216-357-3434 or cudc@kent.edu

11-01-16

ULI Competition Informational Session | Nov 4

2016 ULI Poster_560(click image to view larger)

This Friday, November 4 at 6:00pm the CUDC will host an information session for the 2017 ULI Hines Urban Design Competition. The interdisciplinary competition will take place January 9-23 and welcomes graduate students from architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, real estate, MBA, urban planning and associated disciplines. In recent years, students from Kent State University, Case Western Reserve University, and Cleveland State University have received 4 honorable mentions, in the pursuit of a $50,000 grand prize.

Free food and drinks will be provided. If you are interested in attending the information session please contact Jeff Kruth of the CUDC at: jkruth@kent.edu

11-01-16

MUD Research Symposium | Nov 04

Please consider joining eleven Master of Urban Design students and Associate Dean, Bill Willoughby, this Friday, November 4, 11:00AM-1:00PM at the CUDC for a student-led conference we’re calling, Divergent Humanisms for Urban Space.

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2016 MUD Research Symposium participating students:

Samantha Ayotte, “AGRI-SOURCING: A Menu of Options for Food Production in the City”
Elizabeth Ellis, “The Memory of the City: An Argument for Place in an Impending Placeless World”
Morgan Gundlach, “The Secret Life of Autonomous Vehicles”
Megan Mitchell, “A Concern for Happiness in Urban Design”
Casey Poe, “Wanted: Cities for People”
Alexander Scott, “City: The Urban Canvas”
Caitlyn Scoville, “Toxicity”
Elizabeth Weiss, “The City is a Game”
Spencer White, “Be Ye a Foolish Virgin or a Wild One? Designing the City for a Wild 21st Century”
Connor Wollenzier, “A Retroactive Manifesto for Rem Koolhaas”
Ziyan Ye, “Vertical Urbanism”

Friday, November 4, 2016
11:00 AM – 1:00 PM
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

This event is free and open to the public.

10-24-16

Ryan Dewey | Oct 28

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This week we welcome Ryan Dewey to our Fall Lecture Series. He will be speaking at the CUDC this Friday, October 28th,  at 12 PM. His talk is titled, “Landscaping the Deep Future”, is a land art project that speculates at how we can harness future climate conditions for human-geologic collaborations after human extinction by exploring formal relationships between supply chains and geologic forces. Supply chains already are a kind of geologic force in that they move natural materials faster and farther than nature ever could, this project makes use of that acceleration to prime landscapes for phase changes and activation at the transitions of deep future climactic regimes.

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GROOVESRyan Dewey does post-disciplinary translational research that crosses borders between expanded media, cognitive science, and environmental practice. He is the founder of Geologic Cognition Society, an open platform for collaboration focused on helping people experience nature in new ways. He is the author of the upcoming book Hacking Experience: New Tools for Artists from Cognitive Science (Punctum Books), and has also published in KERB, MONU, and Archinect on topics of urban design, landscape design, and spatial-emotional design. Dewey holds an MA from Case Western Reserve University where he served two appointments as visiting researcher in the Department of Cognitive Science exploring design cognition, ethnography, human attention, visual rhetoric and spatial cognition.

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Join us, Friday, October 28th, from 12 -1 PM. As always, this lecture is free and open to the public.

Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative
1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200
Cleveland, OH 44115

 

09-13-16

INDEX Studio: Cleveland x Havana Report

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The INDEX studio examined the relationships between two cities–Cleveland, Ohio and Havana, Cuba. The 15-week studio took place in the spring of 2016 at Kent State University’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC). By comparing these very different urban contexts, the studio provided new insights into familiar places and a better understanding of the challenges facing global cities.

Read and download the full report, written in English and Spanish, below.

Twelve graduate students generated proposals for a waterfront site in each of the two cities. The Cleveland site is the now-defunct Lakeshore Coal Plant, a monumental structure on a 60 acre site along the city’s eastern lakefront. The Havana counterpart is the Nico-Lopez Oil Refinery, a 500 acre facility still functioning as a refinery on the southeastern banks of Havana Bay.

Ash Pond ParkGraduate students Alexander Scott and Jordan Fitzgerald re-envisioned the Lakeshore Coal Plant as a regional destination for industrial arts preservation and production, located in close proximity to Cleveland’s University Circle arts and culture district.

Proposed Havana Bay Waterfront DevelopmentGraduate student Morgan Gundlach examined the opportunities to incorporate the 5′ (1.50 m) sea-level rise expected by 2100 by creating a dynamic ribbon of green spaces along Havana Bay’s waterfront.  

Students met with a range of design professionals and local experts while in Havana. These insights and direct observations gathered during the five day travel formed the basis of urban design proposals shown in the report. At the conclusion of the studio, students received feedback on their proposals from Cuban architects Ernesto Jimenez and Sofia Marquez Aguiar during the architects’ visit to Cleveland. The students’ design work will be exhibited in Havana, at the Fabrica de Arte Cubano, in Spring 2017.

The INDEX Studio is part of the curriculum for the Master of Architecture and Master of Urban Design programs in Kent State’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED). Kent State is committed to global education and expanding the cultural literacy of our students. Cuba offers a remarkably complex and locally relevant range of design opportunities. This initial studio is a first step toward establishing relationships with colleagues and collaborators in Cuba.

View and download the full report below:

Support for the travelling studio was generously provided by The Cleveland Foundation.

09-08-16

Students Study Housing Alternatives for Cleveland

This summer’s graduate studio at the CUDC focused on issues of housing in the city of Cleveland. Eleven graduate students in architecture and urban design selected sites across the city to develop a strategy for housing various ages, incomes, and forms of collective living. Titled “Home Economics: The State of Housing in Cleveland,” the studio used interdisciplinary methods for making site determinations and strategies—combining urban planning, community development, and design thinking to aspects of their project. Students studied the recent Vacant Property survey released by the CUDC with Thriving Communities Institute and other studies to suggest alternative forms of development in neighborhoods across the city. Strategies ranged from urban systems questions relating to lead contamination in housing, to dispersed housing strategies that attempt to introduce affordability as a stabilizing factor both in gentrifying neighborhoods and in under-invested neighborhoods.

The studio marks the culmination for Master’s of Architecture students at the CUDC, while students in the Urban Design program will continue into capstone research.

Below are examples of some of the student’s work featured in the report.

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images for blog post-2Student Caitlyn Scoville’s project examined methods for remediation, demolition, and development in neighborhoods with high lead concentrations.

images for blog post-3Student Lizz Weiss’ “Aff the Grid” project introduces new models of affordable housing and collective living.  

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images for blog post-6Student Elizabeth Ellis’ project provides housing options for immigrant populations that allow inhabitants to determine the degree of assimilation they wish to undertake in the community. 

08-30-16

Sara Zewde | Sept 06


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We are excited to kick off our Fall Lecture Series with Sara Zewde, Designer at Gustafson Guthrie Nichol. Sara’s talk, “Design at the Margins of the Urban Renaissance”, will be at the CUDC on Tuesday, September 6th, from 12 -1 PM.

Urbanism is in the midst of a renaissance. Many cities are witnessing large investments in urban infrastructure, development, and civic institutions — even those whose populations are not increasing. Yet still, the design associated with this renaissance provokes tension. Design projects by Zewde located in Houston and Rio de Janeiro will be presented as a departure point for a dialogue on resolving this tension, and pushing design towards a more robust, and culturally relevant, practice.

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Sara Zewde is a designer at Gustafson Guthrie Nichol. She holds a Master of Landscape Architecture from the Harvard University Graduate School of Design, a Master of City Planning from MIT, and a BA in Sociology and Statistics from Boston University. Sara was named the 2014 National Olmsted Scholar by the Landscape Architecture Foundation and a 2016 artist-in-residence at the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation. Sara writes and lectures in the discourses of landscape architecture and urbanism and is the recipient of a number of awards, including the Silberberg Memorial Award for Urban Design and the Hebbert Award for Contribution to the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT.

Concurrent to working at Gustafson Guthrie Nichol, Sara continues independent design work in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Houston, Texas; and New Orleans, Louisiana. Sara finds that in considering the relationship between ecology, culture, and craft, there are often many powerful departure points for design. Her work is currently on display at the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale’s Brazilian pavilion.

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Sara will also be speaking at Kent State University’s College of Architecture and Environmental Design (CAED) on September 6th, starting at 5:30 PM in the Cerne Lecture Hall. Her talk at the CAED is titled, “Ecologies of Memory”. Both events are free and open to the public. RSVP is not required but requested, please click here.

If you can not make the lecture we will be live streaming the talk on our Facebook page starting 12 PM. 

View our full list of 2016 Fall Lectures here. 

05-19-16

Save the Date | June 9 | Ernesto Jiménez & Sofía Márquez Aguiar

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Thursday, June 9th the CUDC will welcome Ernesto Jiménez and Sofía Márquez Aguiar, architects at the Fabrica de Arte Cubano (FAC) in Havana, Cuba. Ernesto and Sofia will present their architecture projects built in both Havana, Cuba and in Oporto, Portugal. Based on their experience as professional architects inside and outside Cuba, Ernesto and Sofia will share insights on potential collaboration between designers in Cleveland and Havana. The first half of the talk is titled, “Fabrica de Arte Cubano – A Never Ending Project”. They will discuss the history of the building that now serves as the headquarter of the cultural Fabrica de Arte Cubano (Cuban Art Factory) project. This path is indispensable to understand the logic of intervention from conceptualization to its ever-unfinished realization. Unfinished because the project has the idea of mutation embedded since its genesis. The mutation generated by the fusion of all the arts.

Click here to RSVP for the event. 

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FAC is an artistic project driven by the need to rescue, support and promote the work of artists from all branches of art such as film, music, dance, theater, visual arts, literature, photography, fashion, graphic design and architecture; that through their integration art / artist promote exchanges and direct approach between the public and the creator a massive scale.

The second half of the talk is titled, “Belomonte Studio, some projects”. This discussion contains part of the work done by Belomonte Studio during its ten years of existence, oriented to the development of various projects related to art, architecture and design, from a cross-sectional view; The studio was founded in 2004 by architects Ernesto Jimenez (Cuba) and Sofia Marques de Aguiar (Portugal), in the city of Porto, where they resided until 2013, then was established in Havana.

Ernesto Jiménez (La Habana, 1974)
Architect from Architecture Faculty, ISPJAE, (1996). Member of UNAIC and the Order of the Architects of Portugal (2009).
1996 – 1998> Department of Rehabilitation and Architectural Restoration of the National Center for Conservation, Restoration and Museology (CENCREM).
1999 – 2005> Company Filipe Oliveira Dias, architect.
2004> Foundation Belomonte Studio.
2007> Enterprise Vitrocsa and Jofebar.
2013> EICTV, San Antonio de los Baños. School of Cinema.
2013 – 2014> FAC, Cuban Art Factory.
Other works > Publications Grafic Design, Furniture Design and Architecture Photography.

Sofia Marques de Aguiar (Porto, 1973)
Architect> Art School of Porto (ESAP), (1998). Member of the Order of
Architects of Portugal (1998).
1993 – 2001> Atelier of architecture and urbanism, architect Manuel Marques de Aguiar.
1996 – 2005> CRUARB (urban rehabilitation of Porto as World Heritage city).
2004> Foundation of Belomonte Studio.
2013> EICTV San Antonio de los Baños, School of Cinema
2013 – 2014> FAC, Cuban Art Factory.
Other works> Painting, sculpture, illustration, jewelry, scenery and costume Design for Cinema

Visit our Eventbrite page to RSVP. 

Ernesto Jiménez and Sofía Márquez Aguiar
June 9, 2016
6-8 PM
Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative, 1309 Euclid Ave., Suite 200, Cleveland, OH 44115

02-29-16

Five teams from the CUDC compete at this year’s ULI Competition

Twenty five students from the CUDC, Case Western (CWRU) and Cleveland State University (CSU) recently participated in a two week urban design competition. The students worked cooperatively across disciplines and schools in the fields of design, finance and urban planning to neighborhood scale development proposals. This year, five teams formed at the CUDC.

2016 images for web-2Team Midblocks 

Sponsored by the Urban Land Institute (ULI), the Gerald D. Hines Urban Design Competition asks graduate students to design and finance a hypothetical solution for a site in an American city. Students compete for a grand prize of $50,000 for their schemes. In recent years, the Cleveland teams have won multiple honorable mention accolades in a very competitive field.

2016 images for web-6Team Atlanta Slopes

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Team Coeur

This year’s competition asked students to determine solutions for Atlanta’s Midtown neighborhood near the Georgia Institute of Technology. Student schemes included solutions focused around multi-modal transit, redevelopment of the 1.4 million SF Bank of America Plaza, green space strategies, and mixed-use development near Midtown’s Technology Square. Students were guided through the fast paced competition with assistance from faculty, staff, and numerous professionals from the Northeast Ohio region.

green springTeam Greenspring

alantechTeam Atlantech

 

02-29-16

2016 COLDSCAPES//Adapt Competition Winners

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On behalf of The Center for Outdoor Living Design (COLD) and the esteemed competition jury, we are pleased to announce the winners and honorable mentions selected for this year’s COLDSCAPES//Adapt Competition! The competition sought submissions that creatively respond to the challenges posed by volatile weather conditions in winter cities.

The three winning entries and six honorable mentions were selected by a panel of jurors from the United States and Canada, representing multiple disciplines, including architecture, landscape architecture, and urban planning.

Winners:
1st Place:
Climate Canopy | Thomas Hinterholzer – Innsbruck, Austria

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This project operates within the notions of comfort and energy. It proposes individual energy autonomy and takes a speculative approach in order to link urban energy networks with cold-cliamte outdoor activity. The anticipated technological assets are hydrogen and graphene. Hydrogen is the most efficient lifting gas with a lifting capacity of 1.2kg/m³. Its energy content is 3 times higher than fuel oil or natural gas and it can be produced efficiently and stored safely with new graphene materials. One atom thick graphene sheets are 95% transparent and 200 times stronger than steel. Developed canopies harvest renewable electricity from hydrogen, which can be used for the existing buildings. Various configurations of the canopy are used not only to produce electricity, but to overcome local uncomfortable climatic conditions in order to attain more possibilities for outdoor activity. Because the canopy structures are integrated within the existing built environment they work on the scale of a parcel or a block. It will bring the energy generation into a dialogue with outdoor comfort. This ambitious endeavor has the potential to change the energy household and urban activity of a whole city.

2nd Place:
Threshold | Catherine Joseph – Auburn, Maine

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Freeze/Thaw cycles in the Northeast are inevitable. With these micro-scale processes come ideal conditions for the subgrade build-up of ice lenses that displace soil and fracture rock through a process called “ice heaving”. This process is notorious for demolishing roads and cracking building foundations. Portland, Maine serves as a representative of urban areas that endure widely variable winter conditions. The physics behind frost heaves is predictable. By leveraging the anticipation of the formation of ice lenses, THRESHOLD is a series of independent processes activated by the cyclic build-up of snow and ice that is comes with the freeze and thaw cycles of Maine winters. Facades expand and retract according to the snow build-up, increasing the volume of the air-gap insulation. Walkways warm as the frost heaves activate piezoelectric panels that power underground heating coils. The vertical forces caused by the ice lenses can also be tailored to artistic endeavors – underground organs play the sounds of friction and temperature. Water forced to the surface is directed to ice pools, where ice sculptures are created and encouraged by the upward thrust of the freeze/thaw cycles. In each instance, it is the threshold between frozen and unfrozen that triggers the adaptive urban features.

3rd Place:
The Eddy | Tiffany Chen and Matthew Enos – Minneapolis, Minnesotawinter_render

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Click to view larger. 

Winter is isolating. It severs links between individuals and communities. Minneapolis is accustomed to this. The Stone Arch Bridge in Minneapolis serves as a popular link between neighborhoods, and facilitates encounters. However these opportunities are lost during the extreme Minnesota winter, when few people regularly cross the bridge, due to brutal wind chills. The Eddy acts as respite from winter, not removal. The principal aspect of the design is a series of louvred railing systems. Louvres on the northern face of the bridge close or open, depending on season, to block the bittern winds from the Mississippi below. Thus, they create a calmer, more amenable environment for winter users. The illuminated bridge acts as a beacon in the darkest point of the year. Minimal structural supports modify the rhythm the louvres create, while ‘eddies’ punctuate the length of the bridge. Three minor eddies provide integrated semi-sheltered seating, while the large, main eddy provides a screened space with integrated seating and observation areas.  The eddy establishes the bridge as a winter destination and experience just as much as it is during summer.

Read more…