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VACANCY REUSE

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BIOCELLAR

Abstract: Like many older industrial cities, Cleveland, Ohio has experienced a dramatic decline in population and a corresponding rise in vacant properties. In order to address this fundamental imbalance between supply and demand, cities across the country , and particularly in the former industrial strongholds of the midwest and northeast, have been demolishing housing at unprecendented rates. In Cleveland alone, there are estimated to be more than 8,000 homes in vacantand deteriorated condition. This number is growing due to the on-going effects of the foreclosure crisis. The City demolishes 1,000 homes in a typical year . Large-scale demolition programs represent a tremendous loss of embodied energy. The BioCellar initiative proposes to salvage the most valuable part of a derelict house-it's masonry foundation. An existing foundation wall, surrounded by earth, is an insulated container that can store energy and serve a variety of productive functions such as green houses, solar collectors, aquaculture facilities, stormwater filtration, and other new uses.

Results & Findings:

Categories: Architecture, Vacancy Reuse, Urban Agriculture

   

THE BRIDGE PROJECT REPORT 2009

Abstract: On September 25-26, 2009, the vacant lower level of Cleveland's Detroit-Superior bridge was opened to the public attracting nearly 8,000 visitors over the two day event. As part of the Bridge Project, graduate students from Kent State University's Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative and students from Villa Angela - St. Joseph High School designed and built temporary interventions along the bridge using the event's attendees as "research subjects". This report documents the students' findings on the public's use of the temporary enhancements and presents suggestions for future improvements needed to transform this underused infrastructural relic into an accommodating community asset.

Results & Findings: Report

Categories: Infrastructure, Public Engagement, Vacancy Reuse

   

OAK HILL CHARRETTE

Abstract: The Shrinking Cities Institute is an on-going initiative of the Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC). The Institute consists of programs, events, and research that address issues of large-scale urban vacancy and long-term population decline. The first component of the Institute was the Oak Hill Community Design Charrette held in October of 2005 in the City of Youngstown.

Results & Findings: Report

Category: Vacancy Reuse

   

OPPORTUNITY CORRIDOR

Abstract: Advancing Opportunities: Cleveland's Opportunity Corridor is a concise 13-page report, which includes a general assessment of Cleveland's proposed Opportunity Corridor project (as of March 2014) and offers a forward-looking vision for maximizing the benefits of this large regional investment.

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Categories: Stormwater Management, Vacancy Reuse, Urban Agriculture, Healthy Environments

   

RE-IMAGINING A [GREATER] CLEVELAND ACTION PLAN

Abstract: In 2010, the Re-imagining effort was expanded beyond city limits to include inner-ring suburbs in Cuyahoga County where foreclosures, demolitions, and vacant land are a growing problem. The new initiative, Re-imagining a [Greater] Cleveland delineates the most suitable locations for specific vacant land reuse strategies. This report includes maps of areas in the city and county where vacant land can be used most effectively for green space expansion, agriculture, stormwater management, the restoration of urban watersheds, and the generation of renewable energy. At the city-wide scale, the Cleveland City Planning Commission convened eight vacant land working groups and developed a series of overlay maps to identify priority areas for sustainable redevelopment, as well as locations where vacant land stabilization is a top priority.

Results & Findings: Report

Category: Vacancy Reuse

   

RE-IMAGINING A MORE SUSTAINABLE CLEVELAND

Abstract: Re-imagining a More Sustainable Cleveland is a collaborative effort to address population decline and large-scale urban vacancy in Cleveland. The ongoing initiative is led by Kent State’s Cleveland Urban Design Collaborative (CUDC), the City of ClevelandNeighborhood Progress, Inc. and LANDstudio (formally ParkWorks), along with 30 partner organizations from the Northeast Ohio region. Re-imagining a More Sustainable Cleveland includes a plan, policy recommendations, zoning changes and demonstration projects for sustainable land reuse. The initiative addresses vacancy issues by introducing non-traditional urban land uses to city neighborhoods.

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Categories: Stormwater Management, Vacancy Reuse, Urban Agriculture, Healthy Environments

   

RIGHT SIZING AMERICA'S SHRINKING CITIES

Abstract: In September 2007, the National Vacant Properties Campaign (NVPC) convened Reclaiming Vacant Properties: Strategies for Rebuilding America’s Neighborhoods in Pittsburgh, the first national conference on vacant and abandoned properties. The three-day event gathered nearly 600 people from all over the country to exchange best practices and ideas for dealing with vacant and abandoned properties. The outcome of the charrette is a preliminary action plan that outlines the issues and summarizes strategies for right sizing.

Results & Findings: Report

Category: Vacancy Reuse

 

 
   
 
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